Ke Liu's research while affiliated with University of Florida and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of slow- or non-replicating cells embedded within a protective matrix of biomolecules. Unlike free-floating planktonic bacteria, biofilms are innately tolerant to conventional antibiotics and are prevalent in recurring and chronic infections. Nitroxoline, a broad-spectrum biofilm-eradicating agent...
Article
Antibiotic-resistant infections present significant challenges to patients. As a result, there is considerable need for new antibacterial therapies that eradicate pathogenic bacteria through non-conventional mechanisms. Our group has identified a series of halogenated phenazine (HP) agents that induce rapid iron starvation that leads to potent kill...
Article
Pathogenic bacteria demonstrate incredible abilities to evade conventional antibiotics through the development of resistance and formation of dormant, surface-attached biofilms. Therefore, agents that target and eradicate planktonic and biofilm bacteria are of significant interest. We explored a new series of halogenated phenazines (HP) through the...
Article
There is a significant need for new antibacterial agents as pathogenic bacteria continue to threaten human health through the acquisition of resistance and tolerance towards existing antibiotics. Over the last several years, our group has been developing a novel series of halogenated phenazines that demonstrate potent antibacterial and biofilm erad...
Article
Resistant bacteria successfully evade the action of conventional antibiotic therapies during infection, often leading to significant illness and death. Our lab has discovered halogenated phenazine (HP) analogues which demonstrate potent antibacterial activities through a unique iron-starving mechanism. Herein, we describe synthetic efforts towards...
Article
Natural product antibiotics have played an essential role in the treatment of bacterial infection in addition to serving as useful tools to explore the intricate biology of bacteria. Our current arsenal of antibiotics operate through the inhibition of well-defined bacterial targets critical for replication and growth. Pathogenic bacteria effectivel...

Citations

... Some studies have addressed new antibacterial therapies that eradicate pathogenic bacteria using types of unconventional mechanisms. In a study by Huigens et al. [21], halogenated phenazine (HP) agents were evaluated, which induce a rapid lack of iron, and which can lead to the death of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. The authors approach a microbiological study through a drug model from HP-quinone ether that acts to eliminate general iron chelation and thus releases an active HP agent through the bioreduction of a quinone. ...
... The partition coefficients of all complexes were determined by standard shake flask method in 1-octanol and buffer liquid system (Yang et al., 2021). In brief, the octanol/water partition coefficient is obtained by the incubation of 2 ml of 25 μg ml −1 ruthenium complex 1-octanol and 2 ml PBS samples. ...
... Apart from the chemotypes mentioned above, some conjugates have been investigated to achieve dual modes of action [14][15][16]. Quinolones linking to 4′′-OH of macrolides have been extensively investigated since 2010, which was well summarized in a recent review [7]. The potent hybrids proved to be non-inhibitors in gyrase-based supercoiling assays [17,18]. ...
... Here, antimicrobials can be linked to antibodies, peptides, or various compounds to improve (i) target specificity, (ii) penetration of the biofilm matrix, or (iii) condition-specific activity [162][163][164][165][166][167][168]. This approach can reduce the efficacy of biofilms' protective and resistant nature when challenged by traditional antibiotics and has found success in recent studies and clinical trials [169][170][171]. ...
... Pathogenic bacteria continue to pose a significant threat to humans despite incredible efforts to improve treatments for infection [1][2][3][4]. Bacteria are able to withstand antibiotic therapies using a multitude of well-characterized resistance mechanisms (e.g., mutation of target, efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of antibiotic) during infection [5,6]. In addition, bacteria form surface-attached biofilm communities bearing enriched populations of metabolically dormant (nonreplicating) persister cells that display high levels of antibiotic tolerance and lead to chronic infections [6,7]. ...