Kazunobu Onogawa's research while affiliated with Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and other places

Publications (16)

Article
This article presents field experience in developing local waste management plans called Kebijakan Strategi Daerah (Jakstrada) in the Lake Toba region, one of the popular tourist destinations in Indonesia. It examines the current waste management status and discusses key priorities and actions identified in the Jakstradas to improve the waste manag...
Article
Source separation plays a pivotal role in sustainable and integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) and in achieving a circular economy in Asia. However, it is still not an official practice, and many cities continue to utilise open dumping, involving receiving mixed waste without pre-treatment. This paper, therefore, examines the advantag...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management, particularly the use of open dumps for final disposal has become a global issue. Worldwide, dumpsites are the third largest anthropogenic source of methane, accounting for 11 percent of estimated global methane emissions or 881 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent. The 50 largest dumpsites affect the daily lives...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management, particularly final disposal as open dumps has become a global issue. Worldwide, dumpsites are the third largest anthropogenic source of methane, accounting for 11 percent of estimated global methane emissions or 881 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent. The 50 largest dumpsites affect the daily lives of 64 millio...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report is a Sinhala version (one of the local languages in Sri Lanka) of "Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan for Negombo City, Sri Lanka, 2020–2030" The Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan (WMSAP) for Negombo is the outcome of the committed team effort of city officials led by the Mayor and Commissioner of the Negombo City. The s...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report is a Sinhala version (one of local languages in Sri Lanka) of "Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan for Negombo City, Sri Lanka, 2020–2030" The Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan (WMSAP) for Negombo is the outcome of committed team effort of city officials led by the Mayor and Commissioner of the Negombo City. The strategy...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan (WMSAP) for Negombo is the outcome of committed team effort of city officials led by the Mayor and Commissioner of the Negombo City. The strategy also received inputs from committee members of Negombo Municipal Council (NMC) which comprised of Finance Committee, Health Committee, Industrial Committee, S...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Accumulation of plastic wastes in the marine eco-system is growing rapidly with the increase of plastic production and consumption patterns, particularly single-use plastics as well as unsustainable plastic waste management practices. Land-based sources are recognised as the main cause (up to 80% of total marine debris) of marine plastic pollution....
Technical Report
Full-text available
Negombo City is one of the fastest growing tourist destinations in Sri Lanka. It is the major commercial and transport centre, and main health service provider for the region. However, municipal solid waste management is a pressing concern for Negombo due to expanding urbanization, increasing income, lack of public awareness, changes in consumption...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Similar to other cities in developing countries, the waste management has always been a major societal issue for Phnom Penh. The monthly amount of disposed waste at the landfill more than doubled in the past decade owing to factors such as population growth, economic growth, changes in industrial structure and of people’s lifestyle. While Phnom Pen...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Phnom Penh is facing huge challenges in waste management due to population growth, increasing income and consumption levels, expanding urbanisation and inadequate waste management due to lack of proper waste collection and treatment facilities, technical staff as well as unclear responsibilities among staff members. In this regard, with the request...
Research
Full-text available
This brief summarises the proceedings and outcomes of the 1st CCET webinar which was held on 25 July 2017 at the Pacifico Yokohama Conference Center in line with the International Forum for Sustainable Asia and the Pacific (ISAP) 2017. It is aimed to provide a stepwise guideline on how national and local authorities can undertake practical and impl...

Citations

... In particular, waste briquetting has great potential in rural and remote areas, where biomass is unavailable, or energy resources are scarce (Ferronato, Calle Mendoza, Gorritty Portillo, et al., 2022). Therefore, its application can support the introduction of alternative fuels in developing countries, contributing to the management of waste that is usually disposed of in uncontrolled sites or open dumps (Meidiana & Gamse, 2011;Tatsuno et al., 2021). To support its use, environmental impacts, as well as costs, sustainability and social advantages should be evaluated (Ikhlayel, 2018), in order to identify effective potentialities to reduce the carbon footprint (Abdallah & Elfeky, 2021), give a source of income to marginalized communities (Silva de Souza Lima & Mancini, 2017), and include the population (Rutkowski & Rutkowski, 2015) in employing alternative fuels. ...
... These, in addition to the concerns of resource scarcity, the demands of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the circular economy, have made MSW separation at the source a common practice in the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems of developed countries [3][4][5]. What prevails in most developing countries-especially in sub-Saharan Africa-is different; MSW separation at the source is not a formal practice [6][7][8]. Most developing countries' metropolises, such as the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area (GAMA) of Ghana, collect commingled MSW and dispose of it into semi-controlled landfills and dumpsites [9,10]. ...
... Furthermore, it has been reported that unproper management planning, fecal pollution and solid waste pollution may be important problems in Negombo lagoon due to direct discharge of sewage, solid waste into water (Panagoda et al., 2016). Joseph (2011) estimated that nearly 250 kg/day of raw faces are released to the lagoon through channel segment and neatly 50 % uncollected solid waste are discharge to the surrounding environment illegally (Karunarathana et al., 2019). Therefore, the water quality of Negombo Lagoon is critical for the coastal communities and lagoon ecosystem. ...
... While Browne et al. (2010) mentioned the sea-based sources of plastic contamination as shipping, fishing and transportation contribute significantly to the widespread of MPs marine environment. Beaches and seabed systems have social and ecological relevance and are prone to plastic debris due to the direct link to the land, receiving a substantial amount of plastic-based pollution (Gamaralalage and Onogawa, 2020;Raha et al., 2021). ...
... According to the Table 2, among the two (before and during the COVID-19 pandemic), the average composition of glass accounted for the highest proportion: 33% and 44% respectively. In a similar study conducted in Yangon, Myanmar, among the daily recyclable waste amount collected by waste dealers, glass occupied the highest amount of proportion for 57% (Premakumara et al., 2017). ...
... This is not surprising as, due to its physical features, air pollution is often considered as a local/regional and short-term problem, even if it is of universal nature, i.e. occurring as a concomitant of development in most industrialized areas throughout the world. However, a global perspective is of interest due to the intercontinental transport of pollution [43,44], the serious global health burden of air pollution [1] and the intimate interactions between clean air policies and efforts to achieve the UN global sustainable development goals [45][46][47]. ...
... At the same time, due to financial and human resource constraints, weak institutions, lack of regulations, weak enforcement, inadequate infrastructure, limitations on urban land for waste disposal and the Not-in-My-Backyard (NIMBY) attitude in society, cities in Asia face an immense challenge in improving infrastructure for waste collection, treatment and disposal. To overcome these local challenges as well as achieve global sustainable development goals (SDGs) and counter climate change, Asian cities therefore need strong political leadership, strategic planning and innovative local actions to move away from collectand-dispose-based waste management systems to reduce waste at source rather than at the end (European Commission, 2020; Memon, 2010;Premakumara, 2013;Premakumara et al., , 2017. Effecting such a paradigm shift requires defining waste as a resource and adoption of source separation (waste separation at source) as guiding principles in recovering post-consumer wastes for reuse and recycling, as well as reducing volumes of waste for collection and disposal, based on the reduce, reuse and recycle (3Rs) principles (Agamuthu, 2010;Memon, 2010;Scheinberg et al., 2010Scheinberg et al., , 2011. ...