Kathryn Thier's research while affiliated with Loyola University Maryland and other places

Publications (16)

Article
In this study we examine the role of moral values in predicting COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among Black Americans. Guided by moral foundations theory, we assess the associations between six moral foundations (care, fairness, loyalty, authority, purity, liberty) and attitudes and intentions toward COVID-19 vaccination. Results of a national survey of...
Article
News media are the public’s primary source about risks such as climate change, but traditional journalistic approaches to climate change have failed to build support for collective social responses. Solutions journalism, an emerging practice focused on credible stories about responses to societal problems, may offer an alternate approach. From an o...
Preprint
Concerns are rising about the detrimental impact of health misinformation. Yet it is unclear whether and how health misinformation exerts harmful effects on individual well-being. We conducted a systematic review of published empirical studies (N = 57) that examined the psychological (cognitive, attitudinal, volitional, affective) and behavioral im...
Article
Rationale Health misinformation poses a significant threat to public health. Understanding why people believe health misinformation and who are at risk is crucial for developing effective interventions to reduce the harmful impact of misinformation. Approach We conducted a systematic review of published empirical research that examined individual...
Article
Background Guided by the 5C (confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility) model of vaccination behavior, we examine the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance (i.e. attitudes and intentions toward COVID-19 vaccination) among Black Americans, a group disproportionately affected by the coronaviru...
Preprint
In light of the ongoing debate about the nature of misinformation and the urgent need for a clear definition of health misinformation, this chapter aims to critically review current definitions of health misinformation, identify key challenges in defining health misinformation, and finally propose a tentative, unifying definition of health misinfor...
Preprint
Health misinformation poses a significant threat to public health. Understanding why people believe health misinformation and who are at risk is crucial for developing effective interventions to reduce the harmful impact of misinformation. We conducted a systematic review of published empirical research that examined individual differences in susce...
Preprint
Research on health misinformation has grown rapidly as concerns about the potential harmful effects of health misinformation on individuals and society intensify amid a “post-truth” era. In this chapter, we provide a broad overview of current research and evidence concerning the many facets of health misinformation, including its sources, prevalenc...
Preprint
Research on health misinformation has grown rapidly as concerns about the potential harmful effects of health misinformation on individuals and society intensify amid a “post-truth” era. In this chapter, we provide a broad overview of current research and evidence concerning the many facets of health misinformation, including its sources, prevalenc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Research on health misinformation has grown rapidly as concerns about the potential harmful effects of health misinformation on individuals and society intensify amid a “post-truth” era. In this chapter, we provide a broad overview of current research and evidence concerning the many facets of health misinformation, including its sources, prevalenc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Research on health misinformation has grown rapidly as concerns about the potential harmful effects of health misinformation on individuals and society intensify amid a “post-truth” era. In this chapter, we provide a broad overview of current research and evidence concerning the many facets of health misinformation, including its sources, prevalenc...
Preprint
Research on health misinformation has grown rapidly as concerns about the potential harmful effects of health misinformation on individuals and society intensify amid a “post-truth” era. In this chapter, we provide a broad overview of current research and evidence concerning the many facets of health misinformation, including its sources, prevalenc...
Article
Lack of trust is a paramount problem facing journalism. Solutions reporting, which focuses on credible responses to societal problems, could help improve news trust. In addition, narrative journalism has been associated with several positive outcomes. This study tested the novel idea that solutions stories and narrative transportation can positivel...
Article
Investigative reporting identifies social problems and names people in power who should be held accountable. Solutions journalism is an evidence-based reporting approach that covers credible responses to social problems. To consider these reporting approaches in tandem, this research uses a quantitative content analysis to examine both investigativ...
Article
An increasing number of news organizations are reporting stories about responses to persistent societal problems, a reporting form known as solutions journalism. While this type of reporting practice is typically text-based, visual reporting can also be solutions journalism. Photojournalism theory and practice pose particular insights for advancing...

Citations

... Respondents who demonstrated greater reliance for making dietary changes on poorer quality information sources such as private messages (WhatsApp, Viber, Messenger, etc.), famous personalities, actors or presenters, and social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) held more misinformed views across all 25 statements (Figure 2). Aside from these sources being commonly held responsible for spreading misinformation and for amplified misinformation vulnerability [1,15,[136][137][138][139][140][141], personal factors such as lower levels of health literacy cannot be discounted [142,143]. Research has indicated that individuals with health literacy deficiencies are more prone to use non-scientific sources such as television, social media, blogs, or celebrity webpages [144,145] and more susceptible to health misinformation [136]. ...
... Misinformation can be defined as 'false or inaccurate information, regardless of intentional authorship' [2]. Although misinformation has existed in the health domain, not many studies have demonstrated the behavioral consequences of believing misinformation [3,4]. In the context of a novel pandemic, it is important to assess whether believing misinformation has behavioral consequences such as not following recommended behaviors like social distancing. ...
... Also, it is unclear how different ways of reporting news in journalism relate to the impact of media and political trust on news avoidance. Previous research shows that the communication style in journalism has an effect on trust in politicians (Otto & Maier, 2016) as well as trust in news (Thier et al., 2021). It might be the case that tabloid journalism, including strong dramatization of the topic, lowers trust in news and the government in times of the pandemic and thereby indirectly increases news avoidance. ...
... Journalism practices produce a variety of effects, and existing research has given proof of the beneficial effects of constructive information outputs on divided societies (Waisbord, 2019;Walth et al., 2019). McGoldrick (2013, 2016) studied audience responses to classic "war journalism" and peace journalism (television news) across countries. ...
... Solutions journalism approaches have recently tried to combat pessimistic and avoidant responses in audiences by producing stories about social issues that also focus on attempts to solve the problems. The Solutions Journalism Network, an organization dedicated to studying and understanding social issue coverage, contends that solutions journalism may increase feelings of efficacy, optimism, and engagement in news consumers Curry & Hammonds, 2014), although the peerreviewed literature is less definitive (Dahmen et al., 2019;McIntyre, 2019). A key question is whether a visual approach to solutions journalism might be more effective at generating concern, while also minimizing discomfort and retaining audience interest, compared with photojournalism of suffering alone. ...