Kathryn M. Anderson-Levitt's research while affiliated with University of Michigan-Dearborn and other places

Publications (27)

Article
This essay introduces the special issue on competencies or ‘twenty-first century skills’ as learning goals promoted by the OECD and other international organisations. The studies in this issue trace pathways through which competency-based approaches have been incorporated into national reforms, and explore how reform advocates, policy makers, educa...
Article
This article examines the history of US movements for competencies, often called ‘twenty-first century skills’, in international context. Ironically, US actors were a source of early ideas about competencies but ‘late’ adopters of a competency-added reform—a partial and silent policy incorporated within the Common Core State Standards of 2010. The...
Article
This essay examines comparison in a double sense. Focusing on ethnographies of teachers’ work in the published literature, I ask whether it is possible to compare ethnographic studies across national borders without losing the particularities of local context, and also without losing the distinctive theoretical perspective of ethnographers operatin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is a movement within teacher education programs to prepare social justice educators equipped to disrupt systemic oppression and inequity. While studies have looked at how programs prepare teachers to teach for social justice, they tend to focus on teachers' beliefs and few examine teacher education programs as a whole. Urban teacher residency...
Article
Full-text available
Concern that practical realities in classrooms will ‘trump’ theories has led some universities to design residency teacher education programs that maximize coherence between university coursework and field experiences. Yet, some research suggests that student teachers can learn from dissonance. This qualitative case study of one cohort in an urban...
Chapter
Ethnographic research is interpretive research in a double sense. One role of ethnographers is to understand the participants’ perspectives: How do they interpret the world? At the same time, ethnographers themselves do interpretive work. These essays address both issues.
Article
Around the world there are a number of approaches to the anthropological study of education, as well as allied approaches rooted in other disciplines like sociology. They share family resemblances, but also vary in the main foci of their studies. This article describes some of the approaches, citing the United States, Mexico, and the United Kingdom...
Article
Internationalization of educational publishing promises fresh perspectives and new solutions—but not if US-based editors, reviewers, and readers fail to recognize the significance of research conducted outside the USA. This essay explores the concept of “significance” in the context of peer review of journal articles, and explains why US-based revi...
Article
Full-text available
Opening U.S. educational publishing to the rest of the world promises fresh perspectives and new solutions-but not if U.S.-based editors, reviewers and readers fail to recognize the significance of research conducted outside the United States. This essay explores why U.S.-based reviewers easily miss the social importance and the intellectual intere...
Article
This essay argues against a simple, reified view of culture as a set of ideas and norms belonging to a group or nation, and considers the implications of a more complicated concept for discussion of world culture and the global/local nexus. Most anthropologists define culture as the making of meaning, with an emphasis on the process itself as conte...
Chapter
In the 1950s, a branch of educational research known as the anthropology of education first appeared in the United States, and by the 1970s its practitioners were publishing the Anthropology and Education Quarterly. Also in the 1950s, pedagogical anthropology emerged in Germany and more than a dozen books have now appeared with the title Pëdagogisc...
Article
In a presidential address prepared for the 2006 Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE) meeting, I argue that the new mission statement for CAE represents not a new direction for the organization, but simply a shift in emphasis, albeit an important and timely shift.
Article
The author relies on her experience as Anthropology and Education Quarterly’s chief editor to start to delineate the different movements in anthropology and education around the world. She interrogates the links between researchers in anthropology, ethnography, educational sociology through the networks they build up, the meaning they give to words...
Article
This essay asks first whether schooling is truly a global phenomenon and then, if so, how global schooling affects children's experiences and cultural conceptions of childhood. World culture theorists argue that Western-style schooling is global not only because it touches most children in the world today but because its diffusion has been seen, si...
Chapter
Is there one global culture of schooling, or many? Are school systems around the world diverging from their original European sources, or are they converging toward a single model?1 This book opens a dialogue between two very different perspectives on schooling around the world. On the one hand, anthropologists and many scholars in comparative educ...
Chapter
The Republic of Guinea in West Africa has a centralized educational system that controls teachers right down to daily sign-off on lesson plans by school directors. Yet, ironically, during our research on reading instruction in Guinea, we noted that the Ministry of Education was promoting massive reforms that seemed to encourage teacher autonomy. On...
Article
This comment applauds the blending of global culture and national culture perspectives. It proposes a more systematic synthesis and discusses what it means to take both transnational parallels and cultural variation seriously.
Article
Ambivalences: the transformation of an educational reform in a post-colonial context As educational reforms diffuse around the world, local educators “creolise” them. But exactly what kind of transformation occurs, and why? This case study from the Republic of Guinea shows that it is not a simple matter of blending or hybridizing new ideas with old...

Citations

... As a result, even in a country like France, which imports and translates much more foreign social science than does the United States (Sapiro, 2008), practitioners of a discipline like sociology remain relatively ignorant of the outline of sociology as practiced in the United States (Ollion, 2011). Meanwhile, a mere reference to Bernard Lahire in France speaks volumes to sociologists of education there, while drawing blanks from their U.S. counterparts, just as the canonical significance of a scholar like Florestan Fernandes in Brazil or of Ebuchi Kazuhiro in Japan escapes U.S. readers (Anderson-Levitt, 2011). Imagine, then, how easily the significance of a particular citation or of a particular term in a manuscript could escape a reviewer or editor from outside that particular academic community. ...
... Competency has had an increasing focus in education globally in recent decades, from adult learning in medicine and business, to the education of children. The term competence or competency continues to develop in the literature and is fluid in how it is defined by the several dozen jurisdictions that have introduced competency-based reforms and the international organizations that support that transformation (Anderson-Levitt & Gardinier, 2021). There is, however, sufficient consensus to inform this study. ...
... Various international organisations and most countries have developed twentyfirst century competencies frameworks that select and define the necessary skills or competencies that students need to master as part of the aims for education or learning outcomes (Ananiadou & Claro, 2009;Deng & Zhengmei, 2021;Voogt & Roblin, 2012), which is intended to facilitate individuals' success, society's well-function and national economic prosperity, and increase in global competitiveness, as well as help students become better citizens in the increasingly multicultural society (Anderson-Levitt & Gardinier, 2021;Binkley et al., 2012). Along with international organisations and national governments, technology corporations are also one of the powerful actors in twenty-firstcentury-competencies-based education (Anderson-Levitt, 2021;Griffin et al., 2012). Although there is no uniform and standardised definition of twenty-first century competencies, and there are different terminologies, such as key competencies/competences, twenty-first century skills, transversal competencies, general competencies/skills and so on; these terms have similar intentions, structure and connotation and extension (Nordin & Sundberg, 2021;Wang et al., 2018). ...
... So, caring about the social and emotional lives of my students, for instance, can help me see the whole picture, not to judge the individual in a single moment, as this wouldn't be respectful.' [Flor, interview] Flor reflects on the fact that she must translate what she experienced in the course into practical principles for her own teaching future, for instance, basing a dialogue on mutual respect and a positive connection (Anderson-Levitt et al. 2017;Mosley Wetzel 24 et al. 2017) rather than on the hierarchical teacher > student relationship, which is based on fear and apprehension. Of course, another interpretation might counter that Flor had not really undergone a profound transformation and was merely repeating what she thought I wanted to hear. ...
... These 'differences' play out in the ways in which relationships between globalization and education policy continue to evolve." Anderson- Levitt and Diallo (2003) use an ethnographic account in Guinea that explores the dialectic between local and global forces, specifically how teachers negotiated questions about their own autonomy, for example, who is best suited to select educational goals, topics, materials, and lessons. The study revealed mixed sentiments among teachers, teacher trainers, and officials; respondents generally accepted or resisted particular elements of global and national educational reforms based on their own local interests and motivations. ...
... Глобальное внимание к проблемам образования кочевых народов проявилось во второй половине XX в. вместе со стремлением адаптировать обучение к нуждам меньшинств 263 и, в то же время, реализовать индивидуальное право на образование 264 . Замечу, что понятие nomadic education в контексте научных работ или государственных отчетов по значению не будет идентично российскому «кочевое образование», поскольку подразумевает в целом систему образования для населения, ведущего кочевой образ жизни, будь то школы-интернаты или мобильные школы. ...
... A large segment of work has deconstructed the textual components of published research articles and other genres [32][33][34][35]. Another strand of research focuses on journal publishing and gatekeeping practices, in particular, the growth and practices of English-medium journals published outside of Anglophone contexts [1,[36][37][38][39]; open access journals [40,41]; and "predatory" journals [42,43]; as well as journal publishers and gatekeepers' ideologies and practices [18,[44][45][46]. In recent years, the focus has expanded beyond the preoccupation with the production of research articles to examine other academic genres such as research blogs [35] and wikis [47]. ...
... Policy-transfer theory posits that, while global commitments often appear to be uniform at the international level, on a country-by-country basis practices are negotiated, redefined and adapted for particular contexts (Anderson-Levitt, 2004;Steiner-Khamsi, 2008. The adoption, subsequent redefinition and influence of multiple stakeholder perspectives provide the basis for understanding how inclusion has developed in Jordan. ...
... Range-country collaborators may include formally qualified scientists, conservation professionals, local field/research assistants, and other project staff or local stakeholders. Primatologists, both range-country and foreign, play a role in being cultural brokers across a wide range of stakeholders (Anderson-Levitt, 2014;Caretta, 2015). ...
... Another area of controversy regarding the OECD's policy recommendations concerns the perceived origin of ideas and standards as well as the strictness thereof. So far, research claims that the original 'model education system' was developed in Europe, in a Western society (Meyer et al. 1997;Anderson-Levitt 2003). Consequently, the outcomes, student achievement, and knowledge are tailored to prepare students for a Western-style capitalist labor market and society. ...