Karyn L. Healy's research while affiliated with Queensland Institute of Medical Research and other places

Publications (16)

Article
Bullying victimisation is a serious risk factor for mental health problems in children and adolescents. School bullying prevention programs have consistently produced small to moderate reductions in victimisation and perpetration. However, these programs do not necessarily help all students affected by bullying. Paradoxically whole-school programs...
Article
Parent-child relationships influence learning throughout a child’s formal schooling and beyond. The quality of parenting children receive has a major influence on their learning and developmental capabilities. Parental influence is important in the early years of life and extends throughout a child’s schooling. Parenting has a pervasive influence o...
Article
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Assertive community treatment (ACT) is a well-established treatment for adults with mental illness and has an emerging evidence base for improving mental health outcomes for adolescents. Recent studies have utilized ACT with adolescents who are difficult to engage through traditional psychiatric services. The Assertive Mobile Youth Outreach Service...
Article
Commensurate with the serious risks bullying poses to students’ mental health, substantial attention has been devoted to evaluating school bullying prevention programs. Research on the effectiveness of these interventions shows mixed outcomes. Recent evidence suggests that even programs that reduce overall bullying may have negative outcomes for vi...
Article
This mixed methods study describes attributions for improvement following reductions in victimization for children who were bullied at school. It also tests hypotheses from attribution theory about attributions associated with improvements. The sample was a subset of families who participated in an RCT of a family cognitive-behavioral program to re...
Article
Comorbidity of pain and posttraumatic stress disorder is well recognized, but the reason for this association is unclear. This study investigated the direction of the relationship between pain and traumatic stress and the role that pain-related fear plays, for patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder. Participants (n = 99) used an electroni...
Article
Hospitalization for illness or injury can be experienced by children and their families as traumatic, which can impede recovery and lead to ongoing problems. The provision of quality trauma-informed or psychosocial care by hospital staff may mitigate trauma-related problems; however, there is great variability in the use of psychosocial care practi...
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Full-text available
This study investigated how supportive relationships with peers and parents protect children against ongoing victimization, internalizing problems and depression. The longitudinal data set tracked progress of 111 children recruited for the trial of Resilience Triple P, and previously bullied by peers. Informants included children, parents and teach...
Chapter
Children’s academic and well-being outcomes are influenced by both the home and the school environments. This means that parents and schools have a shared responsibility for promoting children’s development. Research shows that when parents and schools work together, students, parents, and teachers all benefit. One way in which schools can engage p...
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Full-text available
Children victimized by peers are at increased risk of ongoing depression. This study investigates treatment resistant depression in children victimized by peers, following participation in a targeted cognitive behavioral family intervention. The sample comprised 39 children aged 6–12 years with elevated depression compared with a general sample, pr...
Chapter
The quality of parenting children receive has a pervasive impact on children’s development including how well they do at school academically and socially. This chapter explores how schools can assist parents to support their children’s academic and social development at school and at home. After reviewing literature that shows that parenting influe...
Article
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This study compared deficits in executive functioning in psychiatric outpatients with anxiety and depression to neurologically impaired patients and a community sample using a cross-sectional design. Anxious, depressed and neurologically impaired patients were compared for executive dysfunction using the revised Dysexecutive Questionnaire. A large...
Article
Facilitative parenting (FP) supports the development of children’s social and emotional competence and effective peer relationships. Previous research has shown that FP discriminates between children bullied by peers from children who are not bullied, according to reports of teachers. This study investigates the association between FP and children’...
Article
This study examined the effects of a family intervention on victimization and emotional distress of children bullied by peers. The intervention, Resilience Triple P, combined facilitative parenting and teaching children social and emotional skills relevant to developing strong peer relationships and addressing problems with peers. Facilitative pare...
Article
Full-text available
Facilitative parenting (FP) supports the development of children’s social and emotional competence and effective peer relationships. Previous research has shown that FP discriminates between children bullied by peers from children who are not bullied, according to reports of teachers. This study investigates the association between FP and children’...
Article
Full-text available
Being bullied at school has serious mental health consequences for children. Whole school interventions have made only modest reductions in bullying. Particular parenting behaviors have been associated with an increased likelihood of individual children being targeting for bullying at school. There is also evidence that parenting impacts on the dev...

Citations

... Recently, caregivers from a Youth Flexible Assertive Community Team (Youth Flexible ACT) have started visiting her at home. Like Michelle, some children and adolescents face difficulties in multiple areas of daily life due to psychiatric-and comorbid problems, such as family stress situations, substance misuse, and/or problems with intellectual functioning (1)(2)(3)(4). Frequent everyday difficulties include problems with attending school, finding and keeping a job, peer relationships, housing, the legal system or police, and/or personal finance. These children and adolescents are often raised in families coping with psychiatric, financial, addiction, or parenting and relationship problems (1,5). ...
... First, compared to childhood, adolescent bullies are more powerful and have higher status (Dawes & Xie, 2014)-which makes it riskier to stand up against them. Moreover, if defending is encouraged by adults in interventions, defending may be seen as less genuinely driven by a feeling of moral injustice (Healy, 2020) and rather "soft", teacher-obedient behavior, and hence may be sanctioned with lower status among peers. ...
... Audio recordings of the feedback interviews were transcribed verbatim by the principal researcher (EP). Following transcription, researchers (EP and KH) used the constant comparison method [52] as a framework for conducting the thematic analysis, as used in previous qualitative analyses [53]. There were 2 iterations of the qualitative coding. ...
... and neurological deficit in most cases, the cardinal clinical feature of whiplash is neck pain and reduced mobility [3][4][5]. However, the presenting signs and symptoms known as whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) include but are not limited to, widespread bodily pain, traumatic distress [6][7][8] and dizziness and headache [3]. Importantly, up to 50% of those exposed to whiplash following MVC experience persistent symptomatology [9]. ...
... Screening for negative sequelae fosters early identification and referral to psychosocial care (Kazak et al., 2011). Although undetected and untreated PTSS pose a threat to adequate medical care and full recovery (Broadbent et al., 2012;Shemesh et al., 2000), Moss et al. (2019) reported "screening" being still the least frequently observed practice. ...
... With the rapid development of adolescent physiology and psychology, adolescent peer relationships play an increasingly important role in the adolescent social support system. Studies have shown that positive peer relationships can provide adolescents with information, as well as emotional and value support (Xu and Zhang, 2011), all of which can enhance positive behavioral traits (Schwartz et al., 2010) and protect adolescents from experiencing victimization and depression (Abou-ezzeddine et al., 2007;Healy and Sanders, 2018). This can effectively moderate the relationship between adolescent life stresses and depression as well as against other negative affects (Rubin et al., 1992;Deng et al., 2021). ...
... Accessibility issues can also be resolved with one-on-one, home-based parenting programmes [15]. Further, parenting programmes have been adapted for teachers and implemented in school environments [18,19]. ...
... These results indicate that mothers who were warm and affectionate towards their infant tended to be better at identifying, understanding and more responsive to their child's emotion to their child's emotion. Children who can regulate their emotions and empathize with others adapt better in a variety of contexts (Healy, Sanders, & Iyer, 2015). Maternal affection has also been shown to be an important mediator to child ECD outcomes when parental stress is high ( Silinskas et al., 2019) or depressive symptoms are present in parents (Aunola, Ruusunen, Viljaranta, & Nurmi, 2015). ...
... These skills include creating opportunities for peer interaction (play dates), showing an interest in children's friends and their family, actively teaching children friendship-making skills (through modelling, prompting and reinforcing child's positive interactions with peers), managing sibling conflict and bullying effectively at home, and having a good relationship with the child's teacher. Teaching parents facilitative parenting skills reduces children's risk of being bullied by peers at school (Healy & Sanders, 2016). It is useful to highlight to parents the importance of children's relationships with their peers, and where problems are identified, principles of facilitative parenting can help parents to 'coach' their children in relevant social, interpersonal and assertiveness skills. ...
... Additional evidence has confirmed stability of sensitive parenting practices, primarily focused on parenting practices during infancy and toddlerhood (1,51). Also labeled facilitative parenting, parenting characterized by warmth and sensitivity has been found to contribute to child pro-social behavior (52,53), above and beyond dysfunctional parenting (54). Supportive and responsive parenting behaviors have also been established as facilitators of cognitive growth (55), particularly language growth (56,57). ...