Karyll N. Shaw's research while affiliated with University of Kentucky and other places

Publications (3)

Article
A 3 × 3 factorial design examined the effects of three degrees of feedback/feedforward (given before task performance) and three levels of objective probability of success on task performance. Subjective expectancy, personal goal, valence of winning a monetary prize, expectancy, and commitment to winning were measured as intervening variables. The...
Article
Full-text available
Results from a review of laboratory and field studies on the effects of goal setting on performance show that in 90% of the studies, specific and challenging goals led to higher performance than easy goals, "do your best" goals, or no goals. Goals affect performance by directing attention, mobilizing effort, increasing persistence, and motivating s...
Article
Full-text available
: A review of both laboratory and field studies on the effect of setting goals when learning or performing a task found that specific, challenging goals led more often to higher performance than easy goals, 'do your best' goals or no goals. This is one of the most robust and replicable findings in the psychological literature, with 90% of the studi...

Citations

... Lastly, Locke (1968) posited that goal commitment mediates the impacts of incentives on performance. Locke and Shaw (1984) found a positive association between the overall value of accomplishing goals and a commitment to receiving a monetary prize, indicating that financial rewards may enhance the level of goal commitment (Locke andLatham, 1990, 2013;Presslee et al., 2013). Thus, we posit the following hypotheses. ...
... The two-factor motivation theory has since become one of the most used theoretical frameworks in job satisfaction research [9]. The major mid-twentieth century researchers in motivation, [13,1,19] -devised research which Basset-Jones and Lloyd [4] argue can be divided into content and process theories of motivation. Content theories, such as Herzberg et al.'s [13], assume a complex interaction between internal and external factors and explore the circumstances under which people respond to different internal and external stimuli. ...
... In the beginning of the 1990s, though, there was no common understanding of this construct: In different fields of psychological research, the term "personal goals" appeared with in part different meanings. For example, in the field of work and organizational psychology, "personal goals" were described as goals participants really strive for in goal setting contexts, as compared to, for example, assigned or accepted goals (Mento et al., 1980;Locke et al., 1981). Besides, Roberson used the term as a synonym of current concerns (e.g., 1989; Roberson et al., 1989). ...