Karl J. Martin's research while affiliated with Oregon State University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
We examined capture rates of amphibians in 30 250-300-ha landscapes in the central Oregon Coast Range, Oregon, USA, to better understand multiscale habitat associations. We compared capture rates of 5 species that had 26-79 captures to expected capture rates based on sampling effort in 7 vegetation patch types and 4 species with 208-482 captures in...
Chapter
Conservation of mammals in the coniferous forests of western North America has shifted in recent years from species-based strategies to community- and ecosystem-based strategies, resulting in an increase in the available information on mammalian communities and their management. This book provides a synthesis of the published literature on the role...
Article
Typescript (photocopy). Thesis (Ph. D.)--Oregon State University, 1999. Includes bibliographical references.

Citations

... In short, knowledge of connectivity across the landscape is essential to understand wildlife populations (Martin and McComb 2003), and yet connectivity has been enormously challenging to measure, with most of the successful examples of measuring connectivity being experimental studies of small spatial and short temporal scales (reviewed in Debinski and Holt 2000). We will provide an overview of new approaches to measuring connectivity, with examples from some of our own research on mammals in western coniferous forests. ...
... At the landscape scale, she has publications with former graduate students Drs. Kevin McGarigal and Karl Martin, that documented vertebrate habitat relationships to forest pattern and composition at watershed scales [136][137][138], as well as several papers with Dr. Tom Spies and others that estimated responses of several focal species to various forest policies at the regional scale [139][140][141]. Her recent work has included several textbooks that are used in courses that she continues to teach [142,143]. ...
... The abundance and distribution of suitable habitat may be a limiting factor for tree voles (Carey 1989). Although some studies (Swingle 2005, Thompson and Diller 2002, Wooster and Town 1998 have shown that tree voles nest in younger forests, several studies (Aubry and others 1991, Corn and Bury 1986, Gillesberg and Carey 1991, Gomez and Anthony 1998, Huff et al. 1992, Martin 1998 suggest that the species is most abundant in older forests. Thus, timber harvest may impact the species. ...