Karen Slater's research while affiliated with Griffith University and other places

Publications (11)

Article
Background Inappropriate needleless connector (NC) care is associated with device failure from catheter occlusion and patient blood stream infections (BSIs). This can be attributed to a lack of knowledge of connector designs and flushing, clamping, and syringe disconnection techniques. This study aimed to assess nurses’ practice, knowledge, attitud...
Article
Background: Needleless connectors (NCs) were introduced to reduce health care work needlestick injuries (NSIs). If not decontaminated prior to use, NCs can be a portal for patient blood stream infections. The optimal disinfectant, and its application duration, for NC decontamination has not been empirically established. Methods: Factorial design...
Article
Full-text available
Good hand hygiene and “scrub the hub” practices are important to prevent bloodstream infections. This observational study (n = 108) found high compliance with “scrubbing the hub,” although scrub time was shorter than the recommended duration (average 6.1 seconds). Compliance with hand hygiene before medication preparation (33%) and before medicatio...
Article
Allowing needleless connectors (NCs) on vascular catheters adequate drying time after cleaning with antiseptic is essential. Drying time instructions on antiseptic pads/wipes relate to skin use, not inanimate objects. Needleless connector drying times after a 15-second scrub with isopropyl-alcohol, isopropyl-alcohol/chlorhexidine, or povidone-iodin...
Article
The aim of this study was to quantify culturable microorganisms on needleless connectors (NCs) attached to peripheral intravenous catheters in hospitalized adult medical patients. Half (50%) of 40 NCs were contaminated with microorganisms commonly found on the skin or mouth. Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were most commonly i...
Article
A more focused approach to monitoring hand hygiene in a cost-effective, reproducible manner, without inherent bias, focusing on critical sites (often indwelling medical devices) and with realistic targets, is surely a topic which requires more broad discussion to achieve a practical and realistic, consensus approach.
Article
Full-text available
Hand hygiene (HH) compliance by health care workers has been universally disappointing. Two major programs (Washington and Geneva) have demonstrated interventions that induce sustained improvement. The introduction of alcohol-based hand rub (AHR) together with education also has been reported to improve compliance. These interventions were replicat...
Article
Full-text available
Needlestick injury (NSI) with hollow-bore needles remains a significant risk of bloodborne virus acquisition in health care workers. The impact on NSI rates after substantial replacement of conventional hollow-bore needles with the simultaneous introduction of safety-engineered devices (SEDs) including retractable syringes, needle-free intravenous...

Citations

... For these reasons alone, it is essential for pediatric nurses to master standard methods of PIVC fixation for the sake of patient safety during intravenous therapy. In addition, based on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) as the theoretical framework, the appropriate KAP [9] levels of PIVC fixation among pediatric nurses who are responsible for fixing PIVCs are critical to the quality of PIVC fixation in pediatric patients. PIVC fixation in pediatric patients may be more complex than that in adult patients. ...
... Our study showed that 11% of PVCs were colonised with microorganisms and that the rate of microbiological colonisation was significantly higher in the injection port than in the internal lumen of the catheter. The only significant risk factor was having a ported PVC in the hand, which differs from previous findings [12]. Almost all microorganisms found in our study were potential human pathogens. ...
... Alcoholic CHG wipes were associated with CRBSI reduction compared with wipes containing alcohol (70% alcohol) only [41]. The minimum scrub time for effective disinfection is unknown and depends on the connector design and solution, which is applied [42]. Some needleless connector designs may be associated with an increased risk of infection [43]. ...
... [2][3][4] However, there are serious concerns about the role of NC in developing bloodstream infections, which could be prevented by strict compliance of HCW in disinfecting the exposed surface of NCs. [5][6][7] The colonization rate of needleless connector and the impact of disinfection for 15 s on colonization: A prospective pre-and post-intervention study The optimal scrubbing time for the surface of NC with the appropriate disinfecting solutions was not determined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 8 and Infusion Nurses Society. 9 The evidence for successful NC decontamination with 70% isopropyl alcohol ranges from 5 to 60 s. ...
... This may lead to the injection of microorganisms when a PVC is used. However, needleless connectors (NCs) that function as an alternative when using closed PVCs, are prone to microbiological colonisation and need to be meticulously disinfected prior to use [8]. Several studies have shown problems with adherence to this routine [9]. ...
... 31 In view of the amount of time and manpower needed to implement and report generic multidisciplinary hand hygiene audit results, efficacy of cumulative reporting needs to be assessed further. 32 The need to appropriately manage persistent noncompliance was highlighted in this study. However, approaches to addressing poor practices varied with reference to punitive and nonpunitive methods. ...
... Because caution and prevention of exposure and avoidance of high-risk items and the use of protectors during service delivery can be effective in reducing exposure [6]. A serious blood-transmitted infection could cost $1 million to carry out tests, follow-ups, disability costs, and loss of time, so that the cost of preventing suspected damage is estimated at $3,000 [6,7] But despite many emphasis on preventing injuries, these injuries can still be considered as a major threat to healthcare providers [8]. ...
... In the early 1990s studies focusing on reducing needlestick and/ or sharps injuries appeared in correspondence to growing concern about the AIDS epidemic and later hepatitis concerns (Birnbaum, 1993;Lawrence et al., 1997;Zafar et al., 1997); these have continued (Cunningham & Austin, 2007;Phillips, 2012;Reddy & Emery, 2001;Rogues et al., 2004;Smollen, 2004;Sossai et al., 2010;Whitby et al., 2008). The latest of these is a report on effectiveness of the US Needlestick Protection Act passed in 2000. ...
... In 2016, the Tamil Nadu Directorate of Public Health and Preventive Medicine implemented an IPC programme in three public district hospitals, all secondary care facilities, and their affiliated primary health centres (PHCs) in Tamil Nadu, a state in the southern India, with the intent that these three districts would serve as a model for scaling up IPC activities across all 32 total districts in the state. Since IPC programmes are multifaceted and require both behavioural change among participants and support across institutions, it is important to analyse the unique components of this specific programme and learn any lessons (22,23). ...