Karen Konkoly's research while affiliated with Northwestern University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
Full-text available
Therapies focused on lucid dreaming could be useful for treating various sleep disorders and other conditions. Still, one major roadblock is the paucity of systematic information on the consequences of attempting these sorts of dreams. The current study sought to quantify positive and negative aspects of seeking lucid dreams, describe their phenome...
Preprint
The application of lucid-dreaming therapy as a treatment for sleep disorders is hampered by a lack of information about the variable consequences of attempting these sorts of dreams. The current study sought to quantify positive and negative aspects of seeking lucid dreams, describe their phenomenology in detail, and identify features associated wi...
Article
Full-text available
Dream lucidity, or being aware that one is dreaming while dreaming, is not an all-or-none phenomenon. Often, subjects report being some variant of “a little lucid” as opposed to completely or not at all. As recent neuroimaging work begins to elucidate the neural underpinnings of lucid experience, understanding subtle phenomenological variation with...
Article
Full-text available
Dreams take us to a different reality, a hallucinatory world that feels as real as any waking experience. These often-bizarre episodes are emblematic of human sleep but have yet to be adequately explained. Retrospective dream reports are subject to distortion and forgetting, presenting a fundamental challenge for neuroscientific studies of dreaming...
Article
Lucid dreaming is a unique phenomenon with potential applications for therapeutic interventions. Few studies have investigated the effects of lucidity on an individual’s waking mood, which could have valuable implications for improving psychological wellbeing. The current experiment aims to investigate whether the experience of lucidity enhances po...
Preprint
Dream lucidity, or the real-time awareness of a dream, is not an all-or-none phenomenon. Often, subjects report being some variant of “a little lucid” as opposed to completely or not at all. As recent neuroimaging work begins to elucidate the neural underpinnings of lucid experience, understanding subtle phenomenological variation within lucid drea...
Article
Introduction Dreams are emblematic of human sleep, but they have yet to be adequately explained. In part, this is due to the limited options available for peering into dream experiences. Mapping neural measures onto dreams is problematic when those dreams are recounted after waking. Retrospective dream reports are subject to distortion and rapid fo...
Article
Introduction Lucid dreaming (being aware that one is dreaming) is typically a positive experience that may enhance positive mood even after waking. There is concern, however, that lucid dreaming may interfere with sleep quality. In the current experiment, participants practiced common lucid dream induction techniques over the course of a week, and...

Citations

... In lucid dreams, participants can use signals such as eye movements not only to signal that they have become aware that they are dreaming, but also to mark the beginning and end of a particular dream action (such as fist-clenching; Dresler et al., 2011;counting or doing squats;Erlacher & Schredl, 2008), report on features of their ongoing dream, or even provide real-time answers to questions asked of them by the researchers, e.g. through the use of auditory or visual stimuli (Konkoly et al., 2021). In this way, signal-verified lucid dreams provide a promising research model for examining neural correlates of particular processes or features of the (lucid) dream experience, or of lucid dreaming in general. ...
... Recent systematic investigations into REM sleep lucid dreaming have explored "interactive dreaming," in which investigators engage in two-way communication with trained lucid dreamers. Dreamers were trained to respond to external cues through volitional gaze changes or facial or finger movements while maintaining the dreaming state (34). Although investigators were able to successfully communicate with subjects while lucid dreaming, these attempts were unsuccessful ∼60% of the time. ...
... However, this relation was explained by the association between nightmares and poor sleep quality [116,117]. Lucid dreams were also associated with positive emotions in the morning [118,119]. In our study, it is possible that this association between sleep quality and lucid dreams is due to the positive humor in the morning provided by the experience of having a lucid dream. ...
... First, a wide body of research on dream metacognition shows how the capacity for selfreflectiveness isn't exclusive to LD. Non-lucid dreamers can also think and reflect on the dream events as well as execute rational thought (Bosinelli 1995;Cicogna & Bosinelli 2001;Kahan 1994;Kahan & LaBerge 1996, 2011. From the evidence presented in these studies, many authors claim that reflective thought while dreaming isn't a dichotomous phenomenon and moves along a continuum, as it does during waking states (Kahan & LaBerge 2011;Mallett et al. 2021). Second, LD rarely involves a subject who can fully realise the implications of their dream being a dream, as some classical views claim (Tholey 1988). ...
... Furthermore, LaBerge et al. (1981) 33 found that Morse signals induced in the arm muscles could be transferred from LD into reality. Later, it became possible to communicate with people during LD in real time using much broader approaches involving breathing and facial muscle expressions [59][60][61] . ...
... Reactivating these memories about lucidity inductions and lucid dream experiences (as middle-to higher-order priors) may promote lucidity during dreaming. Accordingly, a study combining targeted memory reactivation with LD induction resulted in an unprecedented rise in lucid dream experiences (100). The procedure involved external stimulation (and presumably, sleep disruption), cognitive training, and cued reactivation of specific memories related to lucidity. ...