Karen D. Arnold's research while affiliated with Boston College, USA and other places

Publications (16)

Chapter
Experience sampling method (ESM) and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) refer to a longitudinal research approach in which investigators collect self-reports and/or observational data at recurring intervals about study participants' everyday activities, affect, physical, and psychological states. Advances in Internet-enabled technology, along wi...
Chapter
Research that tracks low-income populations across educational transitions contains threats to validity that can compromise evidence-based educational policy and practice. The Big Picture Longitudinal Study is a national, multiyear study that follows low-income urban youth who were accepted into college as high school seniors. Triangulating the res...
Article
Tracking low-income students after high school graduation presents significant problems for data collection. The Connector Study is an attempt to increase and enrich outcomes data in a longitudinal study of low-income graduates of a national network of innovative high schools by gathering alumni updates through telephone interviews with high school...
Article
The summer after high school graduation is a largely unexamined stage of college access among underrepresented populations in higher education. Yet two recent studies revealed that anywhere from 10% to 40% of low-income students who have been accepted to college and signaled their intent to enroll reconsider where, and even whether, to matriculate...
Article
College students have always searched for meaning and purpose through romantic and intimate relationships. As the dominant script for sexual activity on most U.S. residential campuses, “hooking up” explicitly separates physical intimacy from interpersonal closeness and mutual commitment. A developmental analysis of hooking up demonstrates that norm...
Article
Rather than dwelling on why too many men don't succeed in college, trekker Karen Arnold examines the features of an experience in which many men do excel: the long hike from Georgia to Maine. Educators can learn why accomplishing this feat may be more rewarding than college.
Article
Most students think that a college education, no matter where, is a ticket to success. But how much does this success depend on which college students attend? The author argues that institutional prestige is a more important factor in creating pathways to leadership than we think. (Contains 16 references.) (Author)
Article
This article describes an innovative model of female talent development based upon the life experiences of gifted women from a wide variety of backgrounds and talent domains. The model was synthesized from original studies contributed by more than 20 scholars, psychologists, and educators, known collectively as Remarkable Women: Perspectives on Fem...
Article
Individual and cross case analyses were employed to explore how the pursuit of career and life satisfaction was defined and resolved by 11 elite female scientists in the process of career establishment. A taxonomy which emerged from this procedure identified factors that influenced the aspirations and attainments of women at the threshold of top le...
Article
Presents a model of mentoring that refocuses attention on the essential role mentors play in the transformation of gifts into outstanding creative performance or great performance. It is derived from studies of eminent women and female pioneers in traditionally male professions, longitudinal studies of gifted high school students, and interviews wi...
Article
The 15 year longitudinal Illinois Valedictorian Project follows 81 students who graduated at the top of their Illinois high school classes of 1981. The current study draws from qualitative and quantitative data to analyze the educational and occupational lives of female valedictorians 10 years after high school graduation. Discriminant function ana...
Article
This paper provides an overview of findings from a study of United States Rhodes Scholars elected between 1947 and 1992. The purpose of the research was to trace changing pathways to public leadership over the last half of the 20 th century. Taken together, survey, interview, and field work analyses indicate a major change that American society has...
Article
The first phase of a longitudinal study of innovative urban high schools reveals a gap in the literature on college access. For low-income, first generation high school seniors who have been admitted to four-year colleges, the period between spring admission confirmation and fall matriculation often features a continuation of fundamental decision-m...

Citations

... It captures the momentary behaviors, experiences, thoughts, and attitudes of a person in his or her natural everyday life at several designated time intervals, ranging from a few hours to a day (Niemann & Schenk, 2014;Riediger, 2009). Instant access to emails, web browsers, and user-friendly survey apps such as Expimetrics-all through the convenience of smartphones-has reduced the costs and simplified the logistics of ESM (Beal, 2015;Arnold & Rohn, 2019). Hence, online ESM surveys can now easily achieve larger sample sizes and greater geographic dispersions without causing excessive discomfort (Niemann & Schenk, 2014;Zirkel et al., 2015). ...
... Eighty-five percent of alumni survey respondents had been in touch with their advisors in the five months after they graduated, and 20% had been in contact at least six times. Connector Study data show that advisors were able to give information about 95% of their former advisees two years after graduation (Arnold et al., 2016). ...
... A common perspective regarding hooking up among emerging adults is that perhaps individuals in this period of the life course do so because it is a time of exploration and experimentation (e.g., Arnold, 2010). Arnett (2015) suggested that there are five features of emerging adulthood that make this period distinct from both adolescence and adulthood. ...
... Literature on college access and choice (Abrego, 1997;Arnold, Fleming, Castleman, DeAnda, Wartman, and Price, 2008;Bedsworth, Colby, Doctor, 2006;Bloom, 2007;Cabrera & La Nasa, 2000;Ceja, 2001;Hossler and Schmit, 1999;Kurleander, 2006;McDonough, 2006;Stanton Salazar, 2001;Valadez, 2008) argues that there is not one specific reason for students' lack of success in pursuing higher education. Instead, research suggests that there are two specific components that hinder underserved students in their decision making process to pursue higher education: lack of access to resources (Valadez, 2008;Bedsworth et. ...
... approaches proposed an explanation and career counseling models for career development of gifted students. For instance, developmental perspectives such as Super's (1990) and Gottfredson's (1981) approaches and social cognitive approaches such as Krumboltz's Social Learning Theory (1979) or Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent et al., 1994) provided theoretical basis for the studies (e.g., Arnold, 1993;Karacan-Ozdemir, 2018;Muratori and Smith, 2015;Stewart, 1999;Yalım Yaman et al., 2018;Yun Dai et al., 1998). Considering the potential career development characteristics of gifted students such as multipotentiality and difficulties in career decision making, Super's developmental approach might provide a useful framework to increase career maturity of gifted students, which has been updated as career adaptability with Savickas's constructivist approach (1989), to promote their career choice readiness. ...
... Talented STEM women are interested in science because it matches their aptitudes, is aesthetically appealing, or because they like its logical and rigorous nature (Feist, 2006). Gifted female scientists prize their intellectual lives and are attracted to problems and methodologies associated with science work (Subotnik & Arnold, 1995). Talented women in STEM are more interested in maintaining research as part of their professional lives relative to talented men in STEM and talented men and women in non-STEM fields (Subotnik, Stone, & Steiner, 2001). ...
... Second, students from disadvantaged backgrounds often devote their time and energy to addressing immediate stressors like supporting their families financially or dealing with neighborhood violence (Casey et al., 2011;Goldrick-Rab, 2016;Keating, 2004;Steinberg, 2008). Third, students are less likely to have access to college-educated family members or college counselors who can help them weigh short-term investments against long-term gains (Lareau, 2015;Schneider, 2009), especially during the summer between high school graduation and the start of college (Arnold et al., 2009;Castleman, Arnold, and Wartman, 2012;, 2015. ...
... One model of the talent development of gifted women created by Noble, Subotnik, and Arnold (1999) presented a unique construct to represent privilege in the literature of giftedness: talented women's relative distance from the mainstream. Noble and her colleagues considered the mainstream to be the cluster of traditions, values, and practices that constitute what has been termed the dominant culture within a given society. ...
... Mentoring relationships can be productive and meaningful, offering long-term relationships throughout their career. Additional instruction and coaching are key to mastering the skills that go beyond parents' and teachers' expertise (Arnold & Subotnik, 1995). Mentors are necessary to help build the knowledge and skills needed in a specialized field throughout different stages (Bloom, 1985;Clasen & Clasen, 2003;Subotnik, 2009). ...
... Students are able to have their horizons broadened by exploring interests through realworld applications of learning (Muratori & Smith, 2015). Studies also show positive effects for students who experience mathematics curricular opportunities (Lubinski & Benbow, 1994) that are carefully matched to their age and skill level, which allows them to refine their skills and creative potential (Subotnik & Arnold, 1995), -thus increasing their talent development. The use of challenging curriculum and differentiated instruction may increase achievement of both traditionally gifted and underrepresented students. ...