Kåre Vernby's research while affiliated with Stockholm University and other places

Publications (23)

Article
A substantial body of research has found biased recruitment in a variety of societal spheres. We study selection in the judiciary, a domain that has received less attention than the economic and political spheres. Our field experiment took place in the midst of a Swedish government campaign encouraging ordinary citizens to contact local parties, wh...
Article
The absence of a gendered analysis of the effect of marriage on voting is surprising given researchers’ cognizance of the heterogeneous effects of marriage on a range of other social outcomes. In this paper, we shed new light on spousal dependency by studying the gendered effect of marital disruption, in the form of divorce, on voter turnout. First...
Preprint
An extensive literature links the rise of populist radical right (PRR) parties to immigration. We argue that another demographic trend is also significant: Emigration. The departure of citizens due to internal and international emigration is a major phenomenon affecting election outcomes via two complementary mechanisms. Emigration alters the compo...
Preprint
The absence of a gendered analysis of the effect of marriage on voting is surprising, given researchers’ cognizance of the heterogeneous effects of marriage on a range of other social outcomes. In this paper, we shed new light on spousal dependency by studying the gendered impact of marital disruption, in the form of divorce, on voter turnout. Firs...
Article
Full-text available
Immigrants are underrepresented in most democratic parliaments. To explain the immigrant–native representation gap, existing research emphasizes party gatekeepers and structural conditions. But a more complete account must consider the possibility that the representation gap begins at the supply stage. Are immigrants simply less interested in elect...
Article
Full-text available
How pervasive is labor market discrimination against immigrants and what options do policymakers and migrants have to reduce it? To answer these questions, we conducted a field experiment on employer discrimination in Sweden. Going beyond existing work, we test for a large range of applicant characteristics using a factorial design. We examine whet...
Article
Full-text available
The emergence of anti-democratic movements is a central puzzle to social science. We study a novel and rich historical dataset covering Swedish municipalities during the interwar years and find a strong link between the presence of a military garrison and the emergence of fascist parties. We interpret these results as suggesting that fascist mobili...
Article
Do economic downturns increase voter support for left or right parties? In our empirical analysis, we combine fine-grained registry-data on the labor market impact of the crisis and how it varied across 5000 electoral districts, with district-level data on vote-shares for all major parties in Swedish parliamentary elections before and after the cri...
Article
Widespread and persistent political underrepresentation of immigrant-origin minorities poses deep challenges to democratic practice and norms. What accounts for this underrepresentation? Two types of competing explanations are prevalent in the literature: accounts that base minority underrepresentation on individual-level resources and accounts tha...
Article
When commenting on the European radical right, the term ‘single-issue party’ is frequently bandied about. We survey the various conceptualizations of the term and then apply them to the Sweden Democrats (SD), a party with roots in extremist subcultures that gained parliamentary representation in the 2010 elections. In the empirical analysis, we dra...
Article
Is there a relationship between turnout and election outcomes? Although this is a classic topic in political science, most studies on multiparty systems have important theoretical and empirical shortcomings. First, we argue that the proper implication of the theoretical argument that underpins research on the turnout-vote nexus is that high levels...
Article
The largest disenfranchised group in modern democracies is international migrants who lack citizenship of their country of residence. Despite that noncitizen suffrage has been introduced in some countries and has been the subject of vigorous public debate in many others, there have been no systematic attempts to investigate its policy consequences....
Article
The New Politics perspective holds that there is no room for partisanship to matter for welfare state policies in the present 'era of austerity'. Proponents of power resources theory disagree. In this paper, we show how an emphasis on the actual degree of ideological polarization between left and right can move this debate forward. In essence, the...
Article
In this article, the authors set out to evaluate two competing mechanisms that may account for the negative relationship between xenophobia and left voting. Xenophobia may reduce left voting because parties of the right are more conservative on issues relating to immigration and ethnic relations (the policy-bundling effect), or it may reduce left v...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we address recent claims that executive— legislative relations in parliamentary democracies are undergoing important changes owing to either a `presidentialization' or a `Europeanization' of domestic political systems. Therefore, we test empirically whether parliamentary democracies are indeed experiencing changes in executive—legi...
Article
Strikes are more common in those OECD countries where the legislature is elected in single member districts (SMD) than in those where it is elected by proportional representation (PR). Furthermore, more working days are lost due to industrial conflict in countries with SMD. I suggest a politico-economic explanation for these rarely noticed empirica...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this article we attempt to explain uncertainty in MPs' perceptions of where other parties are placed along key ideological dimensions. In our analysis, using local-level elite survey data, some party-level features and no system-level features are found to be important determinants of MPs' uncertainty. We find that MPs are less certain when plac...

Citations

... Statistical power considerations prohibit a detailed analysis of "origin effects." However, given the salience of ethnic and racial discrimination both inside (English 2019;Eriksson and Vernby, forthcoming;Portmann and Stojanović 2019) and outside (Bengtsson, Iverman, and Hinnerich 2012;Vernby and Dancygier 2019) the electoral arena, we examine whether our findings about immigrants getting stuck at the nomination and election stages are mainly driven by non-European migrants. Alternatively, it is conceivable that immigrants originating outside Europe are less likely to consider elected office since the political systems of their home countries, which are often nondemocratic, are quite different from the Swedish system. ...
... This inquiry is motivated by the fact that there is plenty of evidence that non-citizen immigrants face extensive discrimination in Europe, often justified by the logic that newly arrived outsiders are not sufficiently invested in the national community to warrant equal treatment (Koopmans et al., 2005). For example, there is evidence of bias against immigrants in the labor market (Dancygier and Laitin, 2014;Zschirnt and Ruedin, 2016), the housing market (Diehl et al., 2013;Quillian et al., 2020), as political candidates (Dancygier et al., 2021), in dealing with bureaucrats (Grohs et al., 2016;Hemker and Rink, 2017), and via stigmatization in everyday interactions (Essed, 1991;Tjaden et al., 2018). ...
... Several studies have shown that in Europe there is a systematic ranking (hi erarchies) of ethnic groups based on soci etal proximity (e. g., similar lifestyles and values, and common ethnic traits). For example, Vernby and Dancygier (2019) looked into labor market discrimination in Sweden and found that callback rates de clined with the degree of ethnocultural dis tance. Namely, Swedish nationals received the most callbacks, followed by Polish nationals, leaving Iraqis and Somalis with lower employment chances. ...
... From a supply-side perspective, the political opportunity theory predicts that the collective identity of immigrant groups and their capacity to organize themselves influence their motivation to run for office and therefore affects immigrant political representation (Cinalli and Giugni, 2011). Nonetheless, there seem to be no differences in political interest and engagement between immigrants and natives (Dancygier et al., 2019). Consequently, the supply of minority candidates cannot account for immigrants' persistent political underrepresentation. ...
... Policy 6 disagreements within a party will probably also make other parties less likely to trust that the factionalized party will honor bargaining agreements, since differences in policy views might later manifest itself as a low level of party discipline. Other parties may also perceive factionalized parties' policy positions with less certainty if they are characterized by open internal dissension, and uncertainty may lead to the exclusion of these parties from bargaining if actors are risk-averse (see Bäck and Vernby 2003). ...
... In Sweden, the claim of presidentialisation has been thoroughly and systematically investigated. The question of a transformation from prime minister to president has even become subject of an official government report (Bäck et al. 2007). ...
... The question of presidentialisation and increased prime ministerial power has been thoroughly investigated and discussed in Westminster systems (Foley 1993;Heffernan 2003;Rhodes 1995;Savoie 1999;Weller 2003). However, some signs of presidentialisation in the executive sphere have been seen also in the Scandinavian countries (Aylott 2005;Bäck et al. 2011;Pedersen & Knudsen 2005;Sundström 2009). In Denmark, power has over time been centralised in cabinet around the prime minister, the finance minister and minister of foreign affairs (Pedersen & Knudsen 2005, 161). ...
... We note that the success of a minister, measured by the length and number of tenures he or she has held throughout the years, is dependent on his or her individual characteristics. In addition to suggesting the exploration of frailty models (as we do later in this work), our review of the literature posits that age (Fischer et al., 2012), gender (Fischer et al., 2012) Berlinski et al., 2007) and career path (Bäck et al., 2009;Fischer & Kaiser, 2011;Kerby, 2010) appear to affect the political longevity of ministers. ...
... The repercussions of the Great Recession have led to a renewed academic interest in the political consequences of economic hardship. Scholars have studied how unemployment and financial distress relate to political ideology (Wiertz and Rodon, 2021), partisan choice (Lindvall, 2014;Lindgren and Vernby, 2016), left-and right-wing populism (Funke et al., 2016;Dehdari, 2021;Gidron and Mijs, 2019) and overall political activity (Kern et al., 2015). ...
... There is a burgeoning body of research documenting how refugees are underrepresented or disadvantaged in various important spheres of society. In comparison to natives, but also to other types of immigrants, individuals who arrived to their host country as refugees are underrepresented in the labour market (Bratsberg et al. 2017;Fasani, Frattini, and Minale 2018), are overrepresented among social insurance claimants (Bratsberg, Raaum, andRøed 2014, 2017), vote to a lesser extent in democratic elections (Wass et al. 2015), and are considerably less likely to be elected or nominated for political office (Dancygier et al. 2015). However, whereas we begin to have a rather good understanding of the extent to which refugees are underrepresented in specific parts of society, the potential links between the underrepresentation in different spheres remain an understudied topic. ...