Kara Joyner's research while affiliated with Bowling Green State University and other places

Publications (41)

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In the U.S., many young adults who have had contact with the criminal justice system are parents. Using the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 1321), we drew on family demography and criminology literatures to examine the association between arrest, an understudied indicator of contact with the criminal justice system, and transitions to ea...
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The current study examines the association between social context and the formation of same-sex coresidential unions, with a particular focus on sexual minorities. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), we examine how the likelihood of forming a same-sex coresidential union differs not only by se...
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Cohabitation is one of the fastest growing family forms in the United States. It is widespread and continues to increase but has not been consistently measured across surveys. It is important to track the quality of data on cohabitation because it has implications for research on the correlates and consequences of cohabitation for adults and childr...
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This editorial is aimed at promoting the new series of Research Briefs in Population Research and Policy Review. These shorter, more data-centric articles complement the longer and more conceptually organized research articles published in the journal. Other major demography and population science journals, as well as interdisciplinary journals tha...
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Socioeconomic success doesn’t yet mean social or sexual acceptance for Asian American men.
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The recent US Supreme Court decision to legalize marriages of same-sex couples has resulted in a surge of new marriages, and some end in divorce. There is a limited research base to draw on to understand the potential patterns and correlates of divorce among same-sex couples. There are only a few recent studies on the instability or dissolution of...
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Objective: The recognition of sexual minorities in social science research is growing, and this study contributes to knowledge on this population by comparing the qualities of same‐sex and different‐sex relationships among young adults. Background: The findings of studies on this topic may not be generalizable because they are limited to coresiden...
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Most research on the stability of adult relationships has focused on coresidential (cohabiting or married) unions and estimates rates of dissolution for the period of coresidence. Studies examining how the stability of coresidential unions differs by sex composition have typically found that same-sex female couples have higher rates of dissolution...
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Prior studies concerning patterns of intermarriage among immigrants have primarily focused on how factors such as race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and country of origin shape the choice of a spouse. Moreover, they have focused on intermarriage patterns among immigrants who are already in the US. Using the 2010-2014 American Community Survey...
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Asian American men and women have been largely neglected in previous studies of romantic relationship formation and status. Using data from the first and fourth waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), we examine romantic and sexual involvement among young adults, most of whom were between the ages of 25...
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In this essay, we argue that researchers who base their investigations of nonheterosexuality derived from reports of romantic attractions of adolescent participants from Wave 1 of Add Health must account for their disappearance in future waves of data collection. The high prevalence of Wave 1 youth with either both-sex or same-sex romantic attracti...
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Based on date from Wave 3 and Wave 4 from National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (N=12,287), known as Add Health, the majority of young adults identified their sexual orientation as 100% heterosexual. The second largest identity group,‘‘mostly heterosexual,’’was larger than all other nonheterosexual identities combined. Comparing distrib...
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Researchers continue to question fathers' willingness to report their biological children in surveys and the ability of surveys to adequately represent fathers. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men's fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) and in the...
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Research has extensively examined matching on race and other characteristics in cohabitation and marriage, but it has generally disregarded sexual and romantic relationships. Using data from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examine the tempo of key transitions in the recent relat...
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Commenting on Savin-Williams, Cohen, Joyner, and Rieger (2010), Meyer (2010) dismissed their analytic approach as erroneous and submitted a lengthy defense of his minority-stress hypothesis. We reject Meyer’s refutation on several accounts, the primary one being that the study was not designed or presented as a‘‘test’’of his position. Despite consi...
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Are cohabiting couples more likely than married couples to break up in response to perceptions that their relationship is not fair? Based on social psychological perspectives on intimate relationship stability, in addition to empirical research contrasting cohabitation with marriage, I hypothesize that cohabiting couples will be more likely than ma...
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Matching and attribute trade are two perspectives used to explain mate selection. We investigated patterns of matching and trade, focusing on obesity, using Add Health Romantic Pair data (N = 1,405 couples). Obese individuals, relative to healthy weight individuals, were less likely to have physically attractive partners, with this disadvantage gre...
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This study provides systematic information about the prevalence of early male fertility and the relationship between family background characteristics and early parenthood across three widely used data sources: the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We provide descriptive statistics o...
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Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (or Add Health), a nationally representative sample of adolescents in 1994–1995, we compare the stability of interracial and intraracial dating relationships among white, black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American adolescents by using Cox Regression Models and Multiple Imputation...
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This study tracks and explains changing patterns of involvement in interracial sexual relationships during the transition to adulthood Using a life course perspective that highlights the role of historical changes as well as age-graded changes in contexts and relationships, the authors hypothesize that involvement in interracial sexual relationship...
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Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (or Add Health), a nationally representative sample of adolescents in 1994–1995, we examine if and how friendship activities differ among interracial, interethnic, and interethnic friendships of white, black, Hispanic, and Asian youths. We find that best friends are more likely than higher-...
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Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (or Add Health), a nationally representative sample of adolescents in 1994–1995, we examine if and how friendship activities differ among interracial, interethnic, and interethnic friendships of white, black, Hispanic, and Asian youths. We find that best friends are more likely than higher-...
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Objectives. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we investigate whether Asian and Latino youth value racial boundaries more than ethnic boundaries. We evaluate the relative preferences of same-ethnic, same-race (but different-ethnic), and different-race friends. Methods. We use multilevel multinomial lo...
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Sexual orientation has been a debated risk factor for adolescent suicidality over the past 20 years. This study examined the link between sexual orientation and suicidality, using data that are nationally representative and that include other critical youth suicide risk factors. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were ex...
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This paper uses data from the 1992 National Health and Social Life Survey to examine emotional satisfaction and physical pleasure from sex in intimate unions for adults in the U.S. Using perspectives from evolutionary biology and rational choice theory, we examine the effects of the following factors on emotional satisfaction and physical pleasure:...
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Objective. Even though schools are characterized by an unprecedented amount of racial diversity, it is unclear whether a racially diverse student body necessarily translates into friendships between adolescents from different racial groups. We examine how schools structure adolescent racial homophily, that is, adolescents' tendency to form friendsh...
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A vast literature addresses the correlates of marital stability, but little is known about what unites cohabiting partners over time. Although a specialized division of labor might increase the benefits of marriage and strengthen ties between husband and wife, transactional considerations make specialization unattractive for cohabitors. Drawing fro...
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This study tracks and explains changing patterns of involvement in interracial sexual relationships during the transition to adulthood. Using a life course perspective that highlights the role of historical changes as well as age-graded changes in contexts and relationships, the authors hypothesize that involvement in interracial sexual relationshi...

Citations

... Most participants were from studies comprised of gestational parents (n = 13), 32-44 coparents (n = 6), [45][46][47][48][49][50] or a combination of both gestational and co-parents (n = 6). 25,[51][52][53][54][55] Samples were predominantly White (≥75%), highly educated (≥59% had at least a college degree) and partnered. Eleven samples were majority lesbian or queer cisgender women, 34,39,43,44,[46][47][48][49][50][51][52]55 eight transmasculine individuals with mixed or unreported sexual orientations, 32,33,[35][36][37][38][40][41][42] and two included mixed SGD identities. ...
... The variation is most problematic for comparisons across the three surveys of the share who were cohabiting at birth. Manning et al. (44) compared reports of cohabitation histories in the 2007-2008 administrations of the NSFG, NLSY97, and Add Health and found that the percentage who had ever cohabited was higher in Add Health than in the other two surveys. They demonstrated that the differences were more likely due to variations in measurement than in the compositions of the samples. ...
... These young gay men and lesbian women did not grow up with marriage as a relationship option and may eventually experience marriage levels on par with different-gender young adults as they move into parenting roles. This does not mean that gay men and lesbian women are avoiding relationships: the age at union formation for LGB young adults is roughly on par with that for different-gender couples (Prince et al. 2020). In a new climate of growing acceptance and support of sexual minorities and improved legal protections, young adult sexual minorities will most likely cohabit at levels similar to those of their sexual majority counterparts. ...
... Thus far, however, few studies have investigated instability among same-sex couples who are married. This is most likely due to a lack of available data and generally small samples sizes of same-sex couples (Manning & Joyner, 2019). The data we do have generally suggest that same-sex cohabiting unions in Europe tend to be less stable than different-sex cohabiting and marital unions combined, but that among cohabitors in the United States, same-sex and different-sex couples have similar levels of stability (Bennett, 2017;Lau, 2012;Rosenfeld, 2014). ...
... Extending prior work (Tsuda, 2020), we found that negative romantic and sex-related social cognitions among AAM were related to anticipated and actual rejection based on gendered racism. Large-scale studies have documented a systematic anti-AAM bias in online dating (Lin & Lundquist, 2013), and AAM are excluded from romantic relationships from adolescence to adulthood and remain disadvantaged even when considering a wide range of covariates (Kao et al., 2018). These chronosystemic patterns are problematic as close relationships and social integration are fundamental to human health (Holt-Lunstad et al., 2017). ...
... Indeed, empirical studies found that men and women in same-sex marriages communicate and negotiate more effectively [22], divide housework more equally [23], provide more caregiving when their spouse is ill [24,25], and devote more effort to monitoring their partners' health behaviors compared to men and women in different-sex marriages [26]. Given that same-sex couples share similar relationship quality and stability as different-sex couples [27][28][29], and perhaps more egalitarian and productive relationship dynamics [30,31], they may show similar or even better health changes when compared to differentsex counterparts. ...
... One possibility is that the legalization of same-sex marriage may strengthen commitment and stability in terms of long-term monogamous relationships, 15 similar to what marriage is claimed to do for different-sex relationships. 16,17,18 Research has begun to test the effects of marriage laws on dissolution rates among same-sex couples. 19 Overall, this body of work demonstrates that marriage is important to same-sex couple stability; the ability to legally marry, coupled with general social tolerance toward marriage, is associated with a stronger desire for long-term relationships and stronger monogamy beliefs among sexual and gender minority populations. ...
... Hence, in this section, we focus on studies where, first, the marriage migrants are women, and, second, the direction of migration is from less to more affluent countries. In such marriages, wives may be both better educated and substantially younger than their husbands (Balistreri, Joyner & Kao 2017;Elwert 2016;Levchenko & Solheim 2013). This type of exchange in cross-border marriages, exemplifying what has been called 'global hypergamy' (Constable 2005), can be observed not only for majority men but also for men with minority backgrounds (Kalpagam 2008;Qureshi 2016;Thai 2005). ...
... Race and Ethnicity. There is indisputable evidence that people form friendships based on racial and ethnic similarity (e.g., Antonio, 2001;Brown & Klute, 2003;Hamm et al., 2005;Joyner & Kao, 2000;Quillian & Campbell, 2003;Rhee et al., 2003;Stearns et al., 2009;Syed & Juan, 2012;Titzmann & Silbereisen, 2009;Yeh et al., 2003; see also review by Tran, 2013). Earlier, we described Ueno's (2009) analysis of a large-scale US national study of adolescents. ...
... Empirical studies of intersectionality in mate selection have mostly focused on intersecting hierarchies of gender and race. These studies have proposed that gendered racial hierarchies of desirability marginalize certain groups more than others in different-sex dating markets (Allison and Ralston, 2018;Balistreri et al., 2015;Kao et al., 2018). Research done in the United States indicates that Asian men and Black women are at the bottom of gendered racial hierarchies of desirability (Kao et al., 2018). ...