Kammie L. Kruse's research while affiliated with University of Wyoming and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Ruby Lake, Nevada, is a large palustrine wetland that hosts the southern-most major breeding population of Canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria). That arid marsh, fed by springs derived from mountain snowpack, differs in climate and hydrology from glaciated potholes of the northern prairies where most Canvasbacks breed. Fourteen years of nesting data on...
Article
The southernmost major breeding area of Canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) is located at the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, in the high desert of the western Great Basin. We determined winter distributions, recovery rates, and survival for Canvasbacks banded in Nevada from March to November, 1968-2000. Winter recovery distributions did n...
Article
We investigated the effect of recent habitat changes in California's Central Valley on wintering Pacific greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) by comparing roost-to-feed distances, distributions, population range sizes, and habitat use during 1987-1990 and 1998- 2000. These habitat changes included wetland restoration and agricult...
Article
We monitored the heart rates of free-living Tule Greater White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons elgasi) during human disturbances on their wintering range in the Sacramento Valley of California during 1997. We used implanted radio transmitters to record the heart rates of geese as an observer experimentally approached them at a constant walking speed...
Article
The southernmost major breeding area of Canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) is located at the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, in the high desert of the western Great Basin. We determined winter distributions, recovery rates, and survival for Canvasbacks banded in Nevada from March to November, 1968–2000. Winter recovery distributions did n...
Article
Full-text available
Ruby Lake, Nevada, is a large palustrine wetland that hosts the southern-most major breeding population of Canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria). That arid marsh, fed by springs derived from mountain snowpack, differs in climate and hydrology from glaciated potholes of the northern prairies where most Canvasbacks breed. Fourteen years of nesting data on...

Citations

... Among 74 parasitized nests, there was an average of 7.0 host eggs and 6.1 parasitic eggs. Kruse et al. (2003) reported an average of 6.4 eggs for 223 nonparasitized nests at Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, with 155 successful nests averaging 7.0 eggs; this location is relatively far south for canvasback breeding, although they have bred at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in southern New Mexico. ...
... Nonbreeding season (tule greater white-fronted goose, Anser albifrons elgasi, stand in species for Greenland white-fronted goose): Pedestrian (general) in the USA: Mean FID = 47m (n = 6); Min/Max FID = 25 to 100 (Ackerman et al., 2004). ...
... In terms of host abundance, geese are a prominent example of waterfowl that have successfully adapted to human activity with dramatically increasing populations during the late 20 th century. Across the American continent, Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens), Greater Whitefronted Geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) and Canada Geese (Branta canadensis maxima) have experienced exploding population numbers attributed to an increase in agricultural and suburban land use [37][38][39]. Similar trends have been observed for Greylag Geese (Anser anser) and Barnacle Geese (Branta leucopsis) that have reached super-abundance in Europe and Asia [40,41]. ...
... Wood duck, Aix sponsa 0.42 0.49 0.44 0.54 0.07 0.10 0.02 0.05 Johnson et al. (1986) Mallard 0.50 0.56 0.50 0.63 0.06 0.13 0.00 0.07 Anderson (1975) Black duck 0.52 0.58 0.55 0.66 0.06 0.11 0.03 0.08 Francis et al. (1998) Northern pintail 0.51 0.60 0.56 0.72 0.09 0.16 0.05 0.12 Rienecker (1987) American wigeon, Anas americana 0.61 0.64 0.03 Rienecker (1976) Gadwall, A. strepera 0.69 0.75 0.06 Szymaczak and Rexstad (1991) Blue-winged teal, A. discors 0.50 0.58 0.47 0.64 0.08 0.17 À0.03 0.06 Fleming (2013) Green-winged teal, A. crecca 0.41 0.50 0.52 0.58 0.09 0.06 0.11 0.08 Olson (2013) Dabbler averages 0.48 0.58 0.51 0.64 0.08 0.12 0.03 0.07 Canvasback, Aythya valisineria 0.51 0.71 0.20 Kruse et al. (2003) Canvasback 0.58 0.73 0.15 Nichols and Haramis (1980) Redhead 0.42 0.72 0.30 Arnold et al. (2002) Ring-necked duck 0.33 0.47 0.41 0.70 0.14 0.29 0.08 0.23 Conroy and Eberhardt (1983) Lesser scaup 0.42 0.60 0.40 0.69 0.18 0.29 À0.02 0.09 This study Diver averages 0.42 0.62 0.41 0.71 0.21 0.29 0.03 0.16 provided no support for the hypothesis that hunting mortality has contributed to annual variation in survival for lesser scaup. Credible intervals for all 8 parameter estimates from all 4 cohorts included zero ( Fig. 4), and even if the true parameter estimates for all cohorts were at the extreme negative values of their credible intervals ($À0.6 to À0.7, worst case scenarios), this still indicates that less than half of the annual variation in survival was due to harvest. ...
... The southernmost major breeding population of Canvasbacks (ϳ500 pairs) is isolated in northern Nevada at the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge (40Њ12ЈN, 115Њ27ЈW;Bellrose 1980, Kruse et al. 2003). The refuge is in a high-desert basin (1770 m) between the Maverick Springs Range to the east and the Ruby Mountains to the west. ...