Kaisa Suisto's research while affiliated with University of Jyväskylä and other places

Publications (7)

Article
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The persistence of intrapopulation phenotypic variation typically requires some form of balancing selection since drift and directional selection eventually erode genetic variation. Heterozygote advantage remains a classic explanation for the maintenance of genetic variation in the face of selection. However, examples of heterozygote advantage, oth...
Article
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The definition of colour polymorphism is intuitive: genetic variants express discretely coloured phenotypes. This classification is, however, elusive as humans form subjective categories or ignore differences that cannot be seen by human eyes. We demonstrate an example of a 'cryptic morph' in a polymorphic wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis), a ph...
Article
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To understand how variation in warning displays evolves and is maintained, we need to understand not only how perceivers of these traits select color and toxicity but also the sources of the genetic and phenotypic variation exposed to selection by them. We studied these aspects in the wood tiger moth Arctia plantaginis, which has two locally co-occ...
Article
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Insect metamorphosis is one of the most recognized processes delimiting transitions between phenotypes. It has been traditionally postulated as an adaptive process decoupling traits between life stages, allowing evolutionary independence of pre- and post-metamorphic phenotypes. However, the degree of autonomy between these life stages varies depend...
Article
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1.Trade‐offs have been shown to play an important role in the divergence of mating strategies and sexual ornamentation, but their importance in explaining warning signal diversity has received less attention. In aposematic organisms, allocation costs of producing the conspicuous warning signal pigmentation under nutritional stress could potentially...
Article
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Animals have evolved different defensive strategies to survive predation, among which chemical defences are particularly widespread and diverse. Here we investigate the function of chemical defence diversity, hypothesizing that such diversity has evolved as a response to multiple enemies. The aposematic wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis) displays...

Citations

... The wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis) represents a compelling study species to investigate how different selective pressures can act on a single color locus and maintain within-population trait variation. In this system, male hindwing coloration is determined by a simple genetic basis (Suomalainen 1938;Nokelainen et al., 2022b;Brien et al., 2022): a one locustwo allele polymorphism (dominant W allele and recessive y allele), which translates into white (genotype: WW, Wy) and yellow (genotype: yy) males. Because this is an aposematic moth species, the color trait is not only used for intraspecific communication (i.e., sexual selection) but also to advertise their unpalatability to predators (i.e., interspecific communication). ...
... Our result is contradictory with some studies on aposematic insects that find costs associated with chemical defenses. For instance, in the aposematic wood tiger moth Arctia plantaginis, the excretion of its defensive fluid (which contains also de novo synthesized compounds; Burdfield-Steel et al., 2018) has negative consequences for reproductive output (Lindstedt et al., 2020). Handling/ detoxifying of defensive compounds in its plant diet also comes at a cost to developmental traits and warning signal expression (Lindstedt et al., 2010;Reudler et al., 2015). ...
... For example, warning signal efficacy may trade off with enhanced thermoregulation Hegna et al. 2013) or improved defense against pathogens (Friman et al. 2009). Less efficient warning signal forms can also be favored under certain dietary conditions (Talloen et al. 2004;Lindstedt et al. 2010Lindstedt et al. , 2020. ...
... temperature utilization may differ between individuals that hatch early versus late in the season due to the temperature conditions experienced earlier in life 49 . Studies of other species of butterflies show that the temperature, humidity, and light conditions experienced during the larval or pupal stage can induce the development of different color patterns of the imagoes 50,51 . It is also conceivable that acclimatization and developmental plasticity may result in associations of developmental temperature with thermal preferences and the shape of reaction norms linking performance to body temperature in adults 52,53 . ...
... However, the crucial prerequisite for a critical mass of spectra and widespread usability will be contributions from the chemical ecology community. For example, in the second release (Schulz and Möllerke 2022c), we have additions from the Ando group (Ando et al. 1993(Ando et al. , 1995Yamamoto et al. 2008;Yamakawa et al. 2009Yamakawa et al. , 2011Adachi et al. 2010;Muraki et al. 2014Muraki et al. , 2017. The success Fig. 1 Structure of MACE and flow of data. ...
... Previous studies have indeed shown that multiple selective pressures act on the male coloration. The two male morphs are differently protected against predators (Nokelainen et al., 2014;Rojas et al., 2017;Winters et al., 2021), with yellow males generally having higher survival (Nokelainen et al., 2012; Rojas et al., 2017). In addition, male morph mating advantage is dependent on the morph frequency and males that origin from "mixed-morph lines" have higher mating success compared to the moths that originated from more monomorphic lines (Gordon et al., 2018), which suggests that heterozygote advantage may also contribute to the color polymorphism in this species. ...