K D Cliff's research while affiliated with University of California, Davis and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Full-text available
Grass or plant eating is a widely recognized behaviour amongst domestic dogs. We first estimated the prevalence of plant eating by administering a written survey to owners of healthy dogs visiting the outpatient service of a veterinary medical teaching hospital for routine health maintenance procedures. Of 47 owners systematically surveyed whose do...
Article
Full-text available
Although dogs and cats enjoy a special status in human households, many serve in roles that are not family-oriented. These animals live in research colonies, breeding kennels and catteries, humane shelters and other confined situations. An international panel of experts in the fields of canine and feline health, welfare and behaviour was asked to a...
Article
Full-text available
An international panel of experts in the fields of canine and feline health, welfare and behaviour conducted an online discussion addressing two questions: (1) how can one define quality of life (QoL) for dogs and cats in confined living situations, such as laboratories; and (2) what additional research is needed to determine how optimal QoL can be...
Article
To compare effects of the serotonergic drug clomipramine hydrochloride with those of placebo for treatment of dominance-related aggression in dogs. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. 28 neutered dogs > 1 year old with dominance-related aggression. Dogs displaying > or = 3 aggressive episodes/wk toward > or = 1 human family...

Citations

... The distribution of dog fecal δ 15 N values is consistent with meals at multiple trophic levels ( Figure 4b). The widespread plant remains in dog feces may be somewhat unexpected, yet this is consistent with modern observations of dog diet (Sueda et al., 2008) and genetic evidence that domestic dogs have experienced selection for starch digestion (Axelsson et al., 2013). Animal remains present in feces F I G U R E 5 Stable isotope data from dogs and other introduced taxa (warm colors) and endemic taxa that are potential prey or competitors (cool colors). ...
... Qualitative assessment approaches have been engaged to evaluate general Quality of Life (QoL) in dogs (e.g. Hewson et al., 2007;Taylor and Mills, 2007a;Timmins et al., 2007). Recently this approach has been utilised to specifically assess the QoL of dogs in shelters Collins, 2014, 2015). ...
... Este protocolo compara el comportamiento en una situación actual con su contraparte normal o natural en un ambiente favorable. 39 Estima la calidad de vida dependiendo del tipo de respuesta positiva o negativa que el individuo exprese (ej. lamido de nariz y belfos, polidipsia; movimiento de cola, vigilancia y conductas de exploración), la frecuencia con la que lo realice, y el tiempo que transcurre desde que el animal es situado frente al estímulo y manifiesta la consecuencia. ...
... The use of the expression, in particular, to avoid causing unacceptable suffering allows the legislator to indicate that ELU is restricted. The choice to use this chelant agent extra-label is made by the prescribing veterinarian under his/her direct personal responsibility because this use might be associated with adverse events [130,131] Veterinarians, playing a pivotal role in animal health and welfare, must ensure that they meet the practice expectations when prescribing and dispensing a drug in an extralabel manner [132], as reported in Box 1. 1. Obtain an informed consent from the owner when prescribing a drug in an extra-label manner as suggested in humans for the physicians [133] 2. Understands that he/she has the responsibility to ensure the safety, efficacy, and, in the case of therapy in food-producing animals, the food safety when prescribing an extra-label drug use [134][135][136] 3. Recommends a drug approved for veterinary use as the first drug treatment option where available. Alternatively, recommends a drug approved for human use. ...
... Recommendations to the owners on how to correctly and safely interact with the dogs could also have had a beneficial effect on clinical outcome. Literature in canine psychopharmacology is scarce although studies to date have shown that a 3-week fluoxetine treatment was effective in reducing aggression (Dodman et al., 1996), whereas a 6-week Clomipramine and 4-week Amytriptilyne administration had no effect compared with placebo and behavioural modification therapy alone, respectively (White et al., 1999;Virga et al., 2001). In humans, a decrease in aggressiveness, impulsiveness, hostility and irritability following SSRIs administration has been reported (Coccaro & Kavoussi, 1997;Cherek et al., 2002;Kamarck et al., 2009). ...