Jungho Kim's research while affiliated with Kyoto University and other places

Publications (13)

Article
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Syntactic properties such as word orders are a major factor determining the difficulty of a sentence. In SO-type languages where the subject (S) precedes the object (O) in canonical word order, there is clear evidence that the SO word order is preferred over the OS word order. We investigate to what extent this SO bias is maintained even in typolog...
Article
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Children naturally acquire a language in social contexts where they interact with their caregivers. Indeed, research shows that social interaction facilitates lexical and phonological development at the early stages of child language acquisition. It is not clear, however, whether the relationship between social interaction and learning applies to a...
Article
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Cortical activations during the processing of Kaqchikel transitive sentences with canonical and non-canonical word orders were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Kaqchikel is an endangered Mayan language spoken in Guatemala. The word order in this language is relatively flexible. We observed higher cortical activations in the...
Article
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The processing load of sentences with three different word orders (VOS, VSO, and SVO) in Kaqchikel Maya was investigated using a sentence-plausibility judgment task. The results showed that VOS sentences were processed faster than VSO and SVO sentences. This supports the traditional analysis in Mayan linguistics that the syntactically determined ba...
Article
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The present study investigates whether or not "a trace", which is linguistically hypothesized to be left behind by syntactic movement, is mentally created when a scrambled sentence in Japanese is processed. From past to present, the result or a self-paced reading experiment has supported the psychological reality of trace, but the result or a probe...
Article
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Adults seem to have greater difficulties than children in acquiring a second language (L2) because of the alleged "window of opportunity" around puberty. Postpuberty Japanese participants learned a new English rule with simplex sentences during one month of instruction, and then they were tested on "uninstructed complex sentences" as well as "instr...
Article
Neuroimaging studies of second language (L2) comprehension have reported that the low L2 proficiency of non-proficient learners is associated with greater brain activation in several regions due to the increased deployment of resources to process a not-so-familiar language. However, until now, no attention has been paid to the possibility that the...
Article
The present study aims to confirm the cortical correlates of scrambling effects, a free word order phenomenon that has been observed in a variety of cross-linguistic investigations but whose mechanism still remains unclarified. Many syntax-oriented hypotheses on scrambling have been provided to develop the structural basis of the free word order pe...
Article
In this study, we investigated two aspects of verb processing: first, whether verbs are processed differently from nouns; and second, how verbal morphology is processed. For this purpose, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare three types of lexical processing in Japanese: the processing of nouns, unmarked active verbs, and inflec...
Article
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The question of whether the bilingual brain processes a first and second language (L1 and L2, respectively) differently is a central issue in many psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic studies. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether late bilinguals process structurally complex sentences in L1 and L2 in di...

Citations

... Finally, another point that merits consideration is how a foreign language is taught, given that social learning impacts the brain differently than traditional methods in SLA (Li and Jeong, 2020). For instance, it has been revealed in younger adults learning a foreign language that a larger impact on the brain is induced through social interaction than through media (Yusa et al., 2017). ...
... languages, but a few hints come from recent work on Kaqchikel, an endangered Mayan language spoken in Guatemala (Koizumi et al., 2014(Koizumi et al., , 2020Yasunaga et al., 2015;Koizumi and Kim, 2016). First, however, the following caveat should be noted. ...
... languages, but a few hints come from recent work on Kaqchikel, an endangered Mayan language spoken in Guatemala (Koizumi et al., 2014(Koizumi et al., , 2020Yasunaga et al., 2015;Koizumi and Kim, 2016). First, however, the following caveat should be noted. ...
... Noncanonical OSV scrambled structures may be considered syntactically more complex (cf. Frenck-Mestre et al. [8] for further discussion), but whether this is evidenced in processing depends upon the method and structures employed [52][53][54][55][56][57][58]. If participants rapidly parse scrambled elements, no immediate processing cost may appear [45,56,57,59]. ...
... Moderately proficient language learners at first recruit anomalous regions of the brain not ordinarily used to routinely process language. In contrast, highly proficient second language learners utilize the same regions for both native languages and second languages [8,15,35]. A very recent study that investigated the distinct neuronal activations differentiating code review, prose review, and code comprehension tasks also found a similar pattern-that the brains of participants with greater programming expertise treated programming languages more like natural languages [13]. ...
... One important remaining issue concerns whether the acceptability rating difference between the NCC-NoExtraction condition and the NCC-Extraction condition can simply be attributed to the general scrambling effect, which has been often reported to exist in Korean. Hwang (2008), for instance, shows in his experimental research that Korean scrambled sentences are, in general, more difficult to process or comprehend than their non-scrambled counterpart sentences, and that the processing or comprehension difficulty due to scrambling can be reduced when a preceding context contains the scrambled item, but it does not completely disappear (see also Kim et al. 2009 for a similar reasoning for scrambling in Japanese). To address this issue, the acceptability rating differences between the pair of sentences with long-distance scrambling and sentences without it in the two NCC/NoNCC contexts were compared. ...
... For example, despite their common use of ideograms, Chinese characters and Japanese kanji are regarded very differently in sentences. A Japanese sentence is usually consisted of both kanji (morphograms) and kana (phonograms) and therefore it is a complex mixed system of phonograms and morphograms [23]. ...
... etween language and identities is so closely interwoven that we cannot talk about one without mentioning the other (NORTON, 2013). The aforesaid statement is somewhat supported by the increasing number of researchers and theorist focusing their attention on language learning identity, as an individual, in part innately specified, cognitive process (YUSA et. al, 2011). Language and identity, as discussed previously, give people a sense of social belonging. The concept of social identity is important to be highlighted as it provides a framework to understand the relationship between the concept of the self and the belonging to a larger group in terms of language practices. ...
... Beginning with Chomsky's Syntactic structures (Chomsky, 1957), it has been assumed that passives are syntactically more complex than actives, and that this complexity asymmetrically affects sentence comprehension (Chomsky, 1965: 22). The notion that passive constructions are inherently more difficult to process than actives has also been a core claim in psycholinguistic studies; in fact, past research has shown that passives are more difficult to comprehend both in first language (L1) processing (Abbot-Smith et al., 2017;Caramazza and Zurif, 1976;Dąbrowska and Street, 2006;Ferreira, 2003;Fox and Grodzinsky, 1998;Gough, 1965Gough, , 1966Mack et al., 2013;McMahon, 1963;Johnson-Laird, 1968;Olson and Filby, 1972;Slobin, 1966;Stromswold, 2006;Townsend et al., 2001) and in second language (L2) processing (Crossley et al., 2018;Hinkel, 2002;Marinis, 2007;Marinis and Saddy, 2013;Master, 1991;Mathieson, 2017;Yokoyama et al., 2006). ...
... A number of neuroimaging studies utilizing fMRI and PET have been conducted to test these single-and dual-system accounts of complex word processing. While some of this research focused on the past tense debate comparing regular and irregular morphology (De Diego Balaguer et al., 2006;Desai, Conant, Waldron, & Binder, 2006;Oh, Tan, Ng, Berne, & Graham, 2011;Pliatsikas, Johnstone, & Marinis, 2014;Prehn, Taud, Reifegerste, Clahsen, & Flöel, 2017;Slioussar et al., 2014;Tyler et al., 2005), others compared processing of morphologically complex (inflected and/or derived) words and morphologically simple (monomorphemic words or stems) (Kielar, Milman, Bonakdarpour, & Thompson, 2011;Laine, Rinne, Krause, Teräs, & Sipilä, 1999;Lehtonen et al., 2009;Marangolo, Piras, Galati, & Burani, 2006;Nevat et al., 2017;Wright, Randall, Marslen-Wilson, & Tyler, 2011;Yokoyama et al., 2006). The main logic underlying these studies is that if the dual-system account emphasizing the distinction between lexicon and grammar holds, then comparison of regular vs. irregular, or complex vs. simple morphology would yield differential activation in the brain. ...