Joseph S. Nelson's scientific contributions

Publications (8)

Chapter
The phylum Chordata has been used by most modern workers to encompass members of the subphyla Urochordata, including tunicates or sea-squirts, Cephalochordata, including lancelets, and Craniata, including fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. This chapter discusses the superclass of Myxinomorphi, Petromyzontomorphi and Pteraspidomorphi,...
Book
Full-text available
Please visit the authors' website for this book: http://sites.google.com/site/fotw5th/ Fishes of the World, Fifth Edition is the only modern, phylogenetically based classification of the world’s fishes. The updated text offers new phylogenetic diagrams that clarify the relationships among fish groups, as well as cutting-edge global knowledge that...

Citations

... The family Mastacembelidae, commonly known as spiny eels, is widespread in tropical Africa, the Middle East, South, Southeast Asia, China, and Korea (Nelson et al. 2016). The included species have an anguilliform body, continuous dorsal and anal fins, a moderate caudal fin attached, no pelvic fins, toothplates merged to the hypobranchial, anterior nostrils situated on distal ends of tube-like lateral extensions of the central rostral tentacle of the rostral appendage, and no interarcular cartilage (Kottelat 2006). ...
... Born and raised in Chile, Arratia pursued an early academic trajectory in the evolutionary biology of fishes, a yet undeveloped field in her country. During the early 1980s, she and her husband, Hans-Peter Schultze, moved to the University of Kansas and, with time, converted it into a global hub for fish systematics (Nelson et al. 2010). Arratia's meristic and morphometric studies have elucidated the diversification process of numerous fossils and recent teleosts, including the description of approximately 115 new fish taxa, and the revision of several families (e.g., Diplomystidae, Percichthyidae, and Pholidophoridae). ...
... The Anabantoidei, commonly called labyrinth fish, consist of either three or five families, depending on the methodological approach of the taxonomists. Anabantidae, Helostomidae, and Osphronemidae are the main families, as indicated by genetic-based research [5][6][7]; however, in classical descriptions, the subfamilies Luciocephalinae and Belontiinae were distinguished as separate families from the Ospronemidae [5,[8][9][10]. The natural habitats of labyrinth fishes are found in the tropical waters of Africa and South Asia, in various aquatic ecosystems characterized by constant or periodic low oxygen content [11]. ...