Joseph Murphy's scientific contributions

Publications (4)

Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter introduces consumption, the environment and the policies related to both. It undermines the atomistic and economistic mode of public policymaking in the area of consumption and the environment and builds a richer and more accurate view of consumption. Since the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, consumption has emerged as a signif...
Chapter
This chapter develops a complex and multi-layered understanding of consumption and the policies related to it. Around 1972, governments throughout the developed world began to institutionalize environmental protection. In 1971, eight of the world's richest countries created environmental ministries. Other actions common at this time were the establ...

Citations

... How individual consumers might be incentivised or informed to behave better when it comes to adopting more sustainable solutions was emphasised, at the expense of more socially embedded approaches to consumption. In one of the first books on sustainable consumption, Cohen and Murphy (2001) proposed going beyond seeing consumption as solely a biophysical process, as a material throughput of resources, with often pronounced environmental impacts. Rather, Cohen and Murphy (2001) argued, sustainable consumption necessitates 'an understanding of the political, social and cultural significance of these practices'. ...
... Cohen and Murphy [15] indicate that in the mid-1960s ecological awareness emerged due to the consequences of uncontrolled consumption and its impact on the environment, but only during the 1980s [12], the term "green marketing" was used for the first time [16]. In the literature review, the concept of green marketing is often confused with terms, such as recyclable or environment, but as Polonsky [17] points out, green marketing can be understood as "all activities that produce a minimal impact on the environment and satisfy human needs or wishes". ...
... The segment of socially responsible consumers is widely examined across prior research but mainly focusing either on sustainable consumption ( Murphy & Cohen, 2001;Quoquab & Mohammad, 2016;Geiger, Fischer, & Schrader, 2017;Joshi & Rahman, 2017;Lim, 2017;Minton, Spielmann, Kahle, & Kim, 2018) or on activism (Horton & Kraftl, 2009;Agarin & Grīviņš, 2016;Akiva, Carey, Cross, Delale-O'Connor, & Brown, 2017;Reysen & Hackett, 2017) which does not allow for a complex view of the problem. Echoing the above mentioned issues and the lack of a consistent model that accounts for the interrelatedness between sustainable involvement and consumption, this article aims at proposing a conceptual model which explains the consumer behaviour of segments sensitive to the principles of sustainable development. ...
... During the last decade or so, theories of practice have increasingly been applied to consumption and particularly to the question of how to arrive at more sustainable consumption (see i.e. Cohen & Murphy, 2001; Halkier, Katz-Gerro, & Martens, 2011; Røpke, 2009; Shove et al., 2012; Spaargaren, Oosterveer, & Loeber, 2013; Spaargaren & Van Vliet, 2000; Warde, 2005). Applying practice theory 'in practice' and transposing it into empirical analysis has proven to be difficult, however, as practice theory is arguably more of a philosophical, ontological undertaking than an empirically testable theory. ...