Joseph L. Brown's research while affiliated with Stanford University and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Full-text available
This article focuses on two aspects of Allport's (1954) investigation of the psychology of being a target of prejudice. Whereas most researchers in this area view Allport as an expectancy theorist, we revisit another aspect of Allport's theory: the situational threat posed by negative stereotypes. First, we examine this issue, as it applies to the...
Article
Research on “stereotype threat” (Aronson, Quinn, & Spencer, 1998; Steele, 1997; Steele & Aronson, 1995) suggests that the social stigma of intellectual inferiority borne by certain cultural minorities can undermine the standardized test performance and school outcomes of members of these groups. This research tested two assumptions about the necess...

Citations

... Above all, it seems women usually give more positive performances and learning outcomes than men. However, the opposite result shows men are more likely to attend traditional STEM classes (without art) than women because female students somehow threatened by historical gender bias that men performance better than them in sciencerelated class such as math [5] [6]. There are even samegender teachers who give gender bias against female students, especially at the beginning of their career, through a study towards physic teachers in German, Switzerland, and Austria [7]. ...
... However, does this apply to all boys or only some? Previous research (e.g., Aronson et al., 1999;Nguyen & Ryan, 2008) has shown that identification with the domain moderates stereotype threat effects. Therefore, boys' susceptibility to benefit from a role model may be moderated by the extent to which they identify with, and value academic success. ...