José D. Anadón's research while affiliated with Spanish National Research Council and other places

Publications (46)

Article
Species’ ranges are dynamic, particularly at large temporal scales. The reconstruction of range dynamics has an obvious biogeographical interest, and it might also help to frame current knowledge on the ecology and conservation of a species within a wider biogeographical context. The Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus is a charismatic high-altitude...
Article
The cover image relates to the Research Article https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.13591 “Climate matching and anthropogenic factors contribute to the colonization and extinction of local populations during avian invasions” by Cardador et al. Two monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) in the city of Sevilla, Spain. Image credit: José Luis Tella.
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Aim Concern about the impacts of biological invasions has generated a great deal of interest in understanding factors that determine invasion success. Most of our current knowledge comes from static approaches that use spatial patterns as a proxy of temporal processes. These approaches assume that species are present in areas where environmental co...
Article
The diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin), a charismatic and long-lived species of the United States eastern coast, and the only North American turtle that exclusively inhabits coastal brackish waters. Many terrapin populations are declining, and these declines have been largely linked to human activities; however, few studies have documented...
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Context Land-use change is one of the main threats to biodiversity on the global scale. Legacy effects of historical land-use changes may affect population dynamics of long-lived species, but they are difficult to evaluate through observational studies alone. We present here an interdisciplinary modelling approach as an alternative to address this...
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There is a long‐standing relationship between humans and vertebrate scavengers, as scavengers' contributions take on regulating (e.g. nutrient recycling and disease control), material (e.g. competition and livestock depredation) and non‐material (e.g. sky burials and ecotourism) roles in society. A social–ecological approach to studying biodiversit...
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Species assemblages often have a non‐random nested organization, which in vertebrate scavenger (carrion‐consuming) assemblages is thought to be driven by facilitation in competitive environments. However, not all scavenger species play the same role in maintaining assemblage structure, as some species are obligate scavengers (i.e., vultures) and ot...
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We present a dataset that assembles occurrence records of alien tetrapods (amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) in the Iberian Peninsula, a coherent biogeographically unit where introductions of alien species have occurred for millennia. These data have important potential applications for ecological research and management, including the asses...
Article
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The Cactaceae is considered one of the most threatened taxa in the world. However, the extent to which climate change could compromise the conservation status of this group has rarely been investigated. The present study advances this issue under three specific aims: (1) to assess the impact of climate change on the distribution of endemic cacti sp...
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The organization of ecological assemblages has important implications for ecosystem functioning, but little is known about how scavenger communities organize at the global scale. Here, we test four hypotheses on the factors affecting the network structure of terrestrial vertebrate scavenger assemblages and its implications on ecosystem functioning....
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We assessed the relative importance of human activity and environmental suitability as drivers of compositional dissimilarity of alien birds for 65 of the most populous cities of the Iberian Peninsula. We examined how these drivers relate to Zeta diversity (f) for alien Passeriformes and Psittaciformes. We performed the analysis using multiple orde...
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Abstract Mate searching is a key component of sexual reproduction that can have important implications for population viability, especially for the mate‐finding Allee effect. Interannual sperm storage by females may be an adaptation that potentially attenuates mate limitation, but the demographic consequences of this functional trait have not been...
Article
Our study addresses for the first time the movement patterns of the globally near‐threatened Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus in its most important stronghold, the high altitude mountain ranges of Asia. Tracked individuals (n = 8) in the Annapurna Himalayan range (Nepal) foraged over the vast range of 60715.9 km2 and our results indicated age‐clas...
Article
PDF of submitted version available for free at: http://publish.illinois.edu/maxallen/files/2019/06/Sebastian-Gonzalez-et-al.-MS.pdf Understanding the distribution of biodiversity across the Earth is one of the most challenging questions in biology. Much research has been directed at explaining the species latitudinal pattern showing that communi...
Article
Survival is a key parameter in species' management and conservation. Most methods for estimating survival require time series data, large sample sizes and, overall, costly monitoring efforts. Inverse modeling approaches can be less data hungry, however they are underused in conservation sciences. Here we present an inverse modeling approach for est...
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International wildlife trade is a major source of current biological invasions. However, the power of trade regulations to reduce invasion risks at large, continental scales has not been empirically assessed. The European wild bird trade ban was implemented in 2005 to counter the spread of the avian flu. We tested whether the ban reduced invasion r...
Article
Quantitative studies on nesting habitat selection are important to understand and predict the resource requirements for breeding habitat. In this study, we analyzed nest‐site (cliff) and territory selection patterns of the Bearded Vulture in the Annapurna range of the Himalayas (Nepal). Our study area represents high elevation mountain range system...
Article
Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) populations are declining across most of the species' global range. We studied Bearded Vultures in the Annapurna Himalaya Range of Nepal using line-transect distance sampling, and quantified the perceptions of threats to the species by interviewing local people in two different elevational areas. We recorded 35 B...
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Species translocations are popular tools in conservation, but may be increasingly motivated by species’ popularity, rather than their threat status. We analyzed relative contributions of threat status (a surrogate for extinction risk) and popularity (an estimate of the degree of public knowledge, awareness or notoriety) to the likelihood of develop...
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Nepal has an extreme altitudinal range from 60–8850 m with heterogeneous topography and distinct climatic zones. The country is considered a biodiversity hotspot, with nearly a quarter of the land area located in protected areas. Nepal and the surrounding Himalayan region are particularly vulnerable to climate change because of their abrupt ecologi...
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Global change affects vegetation cover and processes through multiple pathways. Long time series of surface land surface properties derived from satellite remote sensing give unique abilities to observe these changes, particularly in areas with complex topography and limited research infrastructure. Here, we focus on Nepal, a biodiversity hotspot w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global change is affecting vegetation cover and processes through multiple pathways. Long time series of surface land surface properties derived from satellite remote sensing offer a unique abilities to observe these changes, particularly in areas with complex topography and limited research infrastructure. Here, we focus on Nepal, a biodiversity h...
Article
Full-text available
In the transition between Mediterranean forest and the arid subtropical shrublands of the southeastern Iberian Peninsula, humans have transformed habitat since ancient times. Understanding the role of the original mosaic landscapes in wildlife species and the effects of the current changes as pine forest plantations, performed even outside the fore...
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Significance The awareness of the negative consequences of biological invasions and the critical importance of evidence-based decision making have led to a persistent effort to understand the factors driving the successful invasion of exotic species and to predict invasion outcome. We assess, taking advantage of an exceptionally comprehensive datas...
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Studying phylogeographic histories in wide-ranging species provides key insights into those processes shaping current species’ distributions and genetic structuring. In this work, we extend previous sampling and analyse data from three mitochondrial genes to explore in-depth the phylogeography of the spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca), the most...
Data
Distribution of observation between sites and habitat patch. Tortoises found during the surveys. (DOCX)
Data
Parameter estimates from the best approximating, generalized linear model with Standard Error (SE). We show the results of the GLM with model site-patch interaction. We found significant differences in the interaction between PA-AGRI and MA-PINE, in both the density is lower than in the other sites. (DOCX)
Data
Results of the DFA analysis. The first function (the gradient from bare soil to dense shrub coverage) is showed in the X axis, the second function (the influence of tall and thick vegetation) in the Y axis. The 656 vegetation samples are showed in different colors according habitat type and, finally, the centroids for each habitat are also showed....
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Background The Ethiopian highlands are a biodiversity hotspot, split by the Great Rift Valley into two distinct systems of plateaus and mountains. The Rift Valley is currently hot and dry and acts as a barrier to gene flow for highland-adapted species. It is however unlikely that the conditions in the Rift were inhospitable to highland species duri...

Citations

... The paper, "Problems seeded in the past: lagged effects of historical land-use changes can cause an extinction debt in long-lived species due to movement limitation" (Jimenez-Franco et al. 2022), is another contribution in which the authors show the importance of interdisciplinarity in relationship to landscape ecological topics including land use change, landscape simulations, and GIS approaches. Thus, the authors use landscape modeling to develop an interdisciplinary study that shows the effects of land use change may have a greater impact than has been known so far, with previous studies referring mainly to observational studies. ...
... In the context of biodiversity losses, identifying how to preserve the function of scavenging communities is particularly important. The richness of communities has previously been considered a key aspect of ecosystem function 8 , but recent work suggests the functional identity of species-which considers species' specific traits-may be more influential in some ecosystem processes [16][17][18][19] . While scavenging is a common foraging strategy used by many taxa, not all scavengers are equally efficient 20 , with dominant and/or obligate scavengers such as large carnivores and vultures often removing the majority of carrion when present [21][22][23][24] . ...
... For example, arachnids and pteridophytes are rising records only in North America, while birds should receive more attention in South America, Africa and Europe. Also, recent findings are showing increases in records of alien tetrapods in the last two decades in the Iberian Peninsula (Ascensão et al. 2021). In this sense, nations should consider concentrating more efforts on the development of studies assessing the need to implement strategies to containment and management of specific groups of IAS and thus reduce the introduction and spread of new IAS, as is the case in North America and Europe. ...
... A more detailed historical landscape genetics study at the population level for these island endemics would place their estimated divergence times more exactly, with calibration to recent glacial/interglacial cycles. A broad study of the effects of projected future climate change on Cactaceae in Baja California (Benavides et al., 2021) found that seven species of Cochemiea s.l. and four species of Mammillaria s.s. may undergo range expansion as a result of climate change impacts. These findings suggest that the Mammilloid clade in Baja California has perhaps been resilient to the repeated cooling and warming cycles that characterized the Pleistocene. ...
... It focuses on the impact of drought on vegetation and can provide information on the onset, duration and severity of drought by noting vegetation changes and comparing them with historical values, ultimately a truth indicator of present vegetation condition of the crop. Further,Nir Krakauer et al. (2017) stated that, these values are needed to be corrected by doing ground trothing, i.e., information provided by direct observation. ...
... Given the importance of fungal network complexity for enhancing ecosystem multifunctionality, the lack of recovery in soil fungal network complexity may have contributed to the lack of recovery of ecosystem multifunctionality during initial stages of grassland restoration. Our findings are consistent with previous studies showing that soil biota with less complex networks contribute less to ecosystem functioning (Morriën et al., 2017;Wagg et al., 2019;Qiu et al., 2021;Yuan et al., 2021) and that anthropogenic disturbances reduce ecosystem functioning by simplifying ecological communities (Clavel et al., 2011;Gossner et al., 2016;Hautier et al., 2018;Sebastián-González et al., 2020). ...
... almond and olive groves) and abandoned crops 34 , where tortoise's populations reach similar densities 35 . This species is characterised by slow population dynamics 36 , steady population growth rates 37,38 , delayed maturation (9-12 years) 17 , and low offspring production (< 2 hatchings per female and year) 39 . In SE Spain, it is heavily threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation 35,40 , also due to its relevance in the pet trade 41 . ...
... For instance, climate, especially temperature and precipitation, and land uses are considered important-albeit of different strength-drivers of species composition of alien and native bird communities (Li et al., 2018;Sinha et al., 2022;Wayman et al., 2021;Zellweger et al., 2017), but human-related or other factors (e.g. introduction event characteristics) and native diversity might play a role in shaping alien β-diversity (Ascensão et al., 2020;Dyer et al., 2016;Latombe et al., 2018). In this context, we estimated the β-diversity of alien and native communities separately for each time period and partitioned it into species richness differences and replacement components to gain insights into the way alien and native communities are assembled. ...
... Tortoise populations of the family Testudinidae, which includes typically long-living species, are extremely vulnerable to enhanced adult mortality 16,17 . Once tortoises have fully developed their hard shell, predation of adult individuals is rare. ...
... almond and olive groves) and abandoned crops 34 , where tortoise's populations reach similar densities 35 . This species is characterised by slow population dynamics 36 , steady population growth rates 37,38 , delayed maturation (9-12 years) 17 , and low offspring production (< 2 hatchings per female and year) 39 . In SE Spain, it is heavily threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation 35,40 , also due to its relevance in the pet trade 41 . ...