Jos T. A. Verhoeven's research while affiliated with Utrecht University and other places

Publications (19)

Article
Full-text available
Newly constructed wetlands are created to provide a range of ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration. Our understanding of the initial factors leading to successful peat formation in such environments is, however, limited. In a new 100-ha wetland that was created north of Amsterdam (the Netherlands), we conducted an experiment to determi...
Chapter
This introductory chapter defines the key subjects for this volume of ecological studies and briefly presents the common context and the cohesion of the contents of the various chapters. It gives a definition of wetland ecosystem services and outlines briefly the 17 services that have been identified in ecosystems globally and are generally conside...
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Wetlands are key locations in the landscape for the production, consumption, and exchange of greenhouse gases with the atmosphere. In this chapter, we review the major controls of wetland greenhouse gas fluxes and consider how wetlands influence global climate. It is a challenge to determine the overall climatic role of a wetland as the conclusion...
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Water quality in freshwater lakes and coastal areas has deteriorated in many densely populated areas with increasingly intensive agriculture. For example, eutrophication of aquatic environments has become a major environmental problem in large parts of the world. Biogeochemical transformations occurring in wetlands generally result in reduced nutri...
Chapter
Full-text available
Wetlands are being degraded and destroyed at a faster rate than any other ecosystem on earth. Many key functions and values that wetlands provide have already been lost. Since the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, the crucial benefits of wetland restoration and creation have been recognized by an increasing number of countries around the world. The go...
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This chapter reflects on the most important results presented and their relevance and implications for wetland management and restoration. Overviewing the contents, there are two general areas where this volume will break new ground. The first is the more rigorous underpinning of the two most important regulating wetland ecosystem services, and the...
Book
This volume explores major wetland ecosystem services, such as climate cooling and water quality improvement, and discusses the recent wetland conservation and restoration activities in China and neighboring countries. The role of wetlands in either cooling or warming the climate is analyzed as the net balance between carbon sequestration and emiss...
Article
1.Streams and riparian zones are highly heterogeneous ecosystems. Their high biodiversity is promoted by variable flow velocities and water depths, strong hydrological gradients and disturbance regimes. However, human interventions like damming and channelization have degraded these ecosystems worldwide. And, although restoration efforts have incre...
Article
Full-text available
1. Peat‐forming wetlands, particularly floating fens that form the initial stages of these ecosystems, are declining globally due to excavation, dehydration and eutrophication. Restoration typically involves reestablishment of early‐successional open‐water stages, with oligotrophic conditions that are characteristic for these systems. However, rest...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Due to the production of large amounts of tannins and phenolics by Rhizophora mangle, it was hypothesized that the invasion of this mangrove species in salt marshes due to global warming will result in changes in the cycling of carbon and nitrogen. Methods Leaf litter and/or seedlings of R. mangle were placed into 1-m² experime...
Article
Full-text available
The original version of this Article contained an error in the first sentence of the Acknowledgements section, which incorrectly referred to the Estonian Research Council grant identifier as "PUTJD618". The correct version replaces the grant identifier with "PUTJD619". This has been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
Article
Full-text available
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and the main driver of stratospheric ozone depletion. Since soils are the largest source of N2O, predicting soil response to changes in climate or land use is central to understanding and managing N2O. Here we find that N2O flux can be predicted by models incorporating soil nitrate concentration (NO3...
Book
The two volumes on “Wetlands as a Natural Resource” in the book series Ecological th Studies (Volumes 190,191) are based on the highlights of the 7 INTECOL International Wetland Conference in Utrecht,25–30 July 2004. This conference brought together about 900 participants from 61 countries,who discussed a very broad range of science-,poli- and mana...

Citations

... Wetlands have become the focus of conservation and restoration efforts (Hey and Philippi 1999;Erwin 2009) because they provide many important ecosystem services (Costanza et al. 1997;Zedler 2003;Nyman 2011;Mitsch et al. 2015;An and Verhoeven 2019) and support high biodiversity (Zedler and Kercher 2005;Dudgeon et al. 2006). However, anticipating how wetlands will change after the restoration process can be difficult because trajectories of restored wetlands can be unpredictable (Matthews et al. 2009;Dee and Ahn 2012). ...
... Various studies have corroborated the idea that the earliest human food behaviour (prehistoric model of hunting and gathering) included plants in their diet before the advent of agriculture (i.e., Hardy et al. 2015Hardy et al. , 2022Marston et al. 2015). In this regard, the use of plants and the exploitation of wetlands may have played a fundamental role since these environments are species rich and productive in terms of biomass (Cherry 2011;Overbeek et al. 2020;Schlesinger and Bernhardt 2020;Cianfaglione 2021), being full of natural abiotic (e.g., water, stones, clay) and biotic (e.g., animals, plants, mushrooms) resources. ...
... It was not the aim of this study whether or not the wetlands are allocated in the right places, although this is discussed in different studies. Studies conducted by Arheimer and Pers (2017), Land et al. (2019) and Graversgaard et al. (2021) mentioned that wetlands in Sweden are not allocated to areas where they have the most benefit for nutrient reduction, water retention and groundwater recharge. Land et al. (2019) states that the location of a wetland is the most critical factor for assessing the impact of nutrient reduction. ...
... The goals of wetland restoration vary by project, but they are typically not focused solely on water quality improvement. For example, habitat provision, flood water retention, aquifer recharge, carbon sequestration, and cultural services are all common desirable outcomes in RW [13]. In special cases, there are also political and economic goals, as wetlands are built for the compensatory mitigation of wetland losses [14,15]. ...
... Despite the seemingly good system, few countries effectively implement the above-mentioned measures to protect and safeguard wetlands in practice. They are particularly ineffective when economic interests are paramount [18,19]. One of the main reasons for this is that the aforementioned laws and policies are still relatively new, and those responsible often lack sufficient human, financial and organizational resources. ...
... Because of the relatively short atmospheric lifetime of CH 4, higher GWP values apply when considering medium-term mitigation targets (e.g., Nationally Determined Contributions by 2030, or net zero by 2050) rather than global radiative flux budgets in 2100. For long-established natural CBCEs, their CH 4 emissions (even if high) can have neutral radiative balance, since such emissions are counteracted by steady-state atmospheric removal processes, i.e., they do not result in any further atmospheric accumulation (Neubauer and Verhoeven, 2019). ...
... The presence depends on the canopy cover's density, illustrating the importance of riparian vegetation (Mangadze et al. 2019). The vegetation influences the quality and quantity of food for macroinvertebrates (Fierro et al. 2017;Fraaije et al. 2019). Furthermore, it directly affects leaf, soil, and wood allochthonous, considered by benthic composition (Iñiguez-Armijos et al. 2014). ...
... Rates vary depending on the age of the plots and the density of vegetation . Functional plant diversity has also proven to have a positive effect on carbon sequestration when restoring floating fen ecosystems (van Zuidam et al. 2019). In contrast to other benefits of NNBF, which are often provided to communities relatively near the ecosystems that generate them (e.g., coastal risk reduction), increases in carbon storage and sequestration resulting from habitat restoration benefit the global community due to atmospheric circulation (Mandle et al. 2015). ...
... Complete peat CO 2 budgets considering all sources of C inputs (litterfall and root mortality) and outputs (heterotrophic respiration and lateral carbon transport) are needed to assess the net impact of peatland drainage and hydrological restoration on peat CO 2 emissions [60]. In addition, peatland drainage and restoration impact non-CO 2 emissions (CH 4 , N 2 O) [8,24,61] as well as C storage in aboveground and belowground vegetation [62]. Our results also do not account for GHG emissions from CH 4 or N 2 O, two potent greenhouse gases that are produced under anaerobic or transitional conditions in peatland soils [61,63]. ...
... A serapilheira do manguezal é todo material vegetal e animal que é depositado sobre o solo da floresta, constituído por folhas, parte lenhosa (galhos, caule, cascas), estípula e material reprodutivo (flores, frutos, propágulos e sementes), além de animais mortos e fezes (Golley, 1983;Fernandes et al., 2007;Silva et al., 2011). Essa serapilheira compõem um complexo sistema de ciclagem de nutrientes que fornecem ao ecossistema nutrição fundamental para sua manutenção (Laanbroek et al., 2018). ...