Jonathan L. Stahl's research while affiliated with The Ohio State University and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Full-text available
Two experiments examined how the ways in which people mentally represent their personal networks affect perceptions of social support. Social support research often uses ‘‘name generators’ ’in which individuals are asked to choose how many people they receive support from, resulting in cognitive networks that confound size and density. Taking a fix...
Article
Full-text available
Much remains unknown about moment-to-moment social-network cognition—that is, who comes to mind as we go about our day-to-day lives. Responding to this void, we describe the real-time construction of cognitive social networks. First, we outline the types of relational structures that comprise momentary networks, distinguishing the roles of personal...
Article
Visual aesthetic evaluations, which impact decision-making and well-being, recruit the ventral visual pathway, subcortical reward circuitry, and parts of the medial prefrontal cortex overlapping with the default-mode network (DMN). However, it is unknown whether these networks represent aesthetic appeal in a domain-general fashion, independent of d...
Conference Paper
Are there "domain-general" neural processes that support aesthetic appreciation regardless of stimulus type, similar to the encoding of abstract expected value of goods? Recent work examining face and place attractiveness reported a common representation of attractiveness in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC; Pegors et al., in press). We sought to tes...
Article
Full-text available
How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewer...

Citations

... These variables have been used as instrument in previous studies assessing social support and health [54,55]. Living in a higher density area is associated with greater access to services and facilities which provide opportunities for people to meet and interact compared to lower density areas with limited access to network and resources [56]. ...
... Still, all three perspectives stress that people are limited in the amount of energy they can exert toward their ties. The rise of Path, therefore, highlights the question of whether social media change how people attend to-or think about (Bayer, Lewis, et al., 2020)-certain types of ties. And this question is especially pertinent as algorithmic recommendation systems (Seaver, 2019) and "nudges" (Wu et al., 2020) are deployed to shape user behavior and channel network attention. ...
... Direct measurements quantify appraisal that is directly reported by participants. They can be collected when participants are appraising images by means of dichotomous (e.g., "no," "yes"; Jacobsen et al., 2006), ordinal (e.g., from "ugly, "indifferent," "beautiful"; Ishizu & Zeki, 2011), interval, or continuous rating scales (e.g., aesthetically "moving," from low to high; Vessel et al., 2019) and when participants are expressing their preferences by choosing between two images (e.g., Kim et al., 2007) or through ratings obtained continuously over time (e.g., Belfi et al., 2019;Isik & Vessel, 2021). Indirect measures, on the other hand, are collected using a variety of alternative tools that are intended to measure an appraisal indirectly, with the goal of measuring appeal in a manner that is unmediated, or at least only partially mediated, by conscious reflection and labelling of experience. ...
... Our study critically adds to this prior evidence by showing that the mPFC is also a key region in mediating the 'transfer' from the domain of aesthetics to the domain of morality (in the form of a stereotypical Beauty-is-Good association). This is also in agreement with prior evidence pointing to a critical role of the mPFC not just in selectively mediating moral judgments (e.g., Greene and Haidt, 2002;Beer and Ochsner, 2006;Bzdok et al., 2012b;Englander et al., 2012;Yoder and Decety, 2014) and aesthetic judgments (Jacobsen et al., 2006;Kirsch et al., 2015;Pegors et al., 2015;Vessel et al., 2015), but also in linking aesthetic and moral valuations (Bzdok et al., 2012a;Avram et al., 2013;Wang et al., 2014). ...
... Similarly, Kaplan and Kaplan (1989) showed that landscape preference could be described through facets such as naturalness and legibility. Shared preference may be weaker in architectural images than in landscape images (Vessel, Stahl, Maurer, Denker, & Starr, 2014;Weinberger, Christensen, Coburn, & Chatterjee, 2021), however those that share preferences for interior designs appear to share preferences for exterior designs, suggesting some notion of mutual experience by style (Vessel et al., 2014). Vessel et al. (2014) theorise that the distinction between landscape and architectural agreement could be due to landscapes tying to evolutionary needs whilst architecture does not, leading to judgments being made on more personal reasonings. ...