Jon I Barnes's scientific contributions

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
This paper informs policy over the efficiency of investments on Namibia's rangelands both now and under future expected climate change. It is in this setting that Namibia's pastoralist communities, communal conservancies and increasing numbers of wildlife reside, and their economic activity dominates. We bring the principles of economics to decisio...
Article
Full-text available
A national forest inventory completed in 2004 enabled the development of preliminary forest resource accounts for Namibia. The total woody resources volume was estimated at 257 million m3. Forest products used for fuel, poles, timber and non-timber were included in the accounts, but charcoal production on private land was excluded. Forest use direc...

Citations

... Both ecological and socio-economic drivers of desertification must also be examined in the context of climate change (MIRZABAEV et al. 2019). The increase in atmospheric CO2, temperature, and climate variability have severe effects on rangelands (BARNES et al. 2012;POLLEY et al. 2017;GODDE et al. 2020). These include a decrease in rainfall and, therefore, water availability, a decrease in plant production, and an increase in evaporation, altogether altering the quantity and quality of forage for livestock and the plant community composition. ...
... An economic study of Namibia's protected areas indicated that the PA system contributed up to 6 per cent of Namibia's Main zone for IPTT support Figure 5. Namibia's pipeline approach for the sustainable use of biodiversity-based products. 18 GDP through park-based tourism -excluding other ecosystem services -and that the economic rate of return on government investment in the PA system over 20 years was as much as 23 per cent (Turpie et al., 2005). Motivated by this study, MET increased the annual budget for park management and development by 310 per cent over a period of four years. ...
... Using data for average auction prices received for rhino sold in KwaZulu-Natal from 2000 to 2005, Spenceley and Barnes (2005) found that the price for white rhino had dropped by 50% from an average of US$34,888 in 2000 to $17,393 in 2005, while the average price of black rhino had dropped by 21%. At the same time, the number of animals sold also declined. ...
... Essential provisioning services of the woodlands in the region are the supply of fuelwood, household construction materials (primarily poles), sawn timber (mainly P. angolensis), and wood for utensils and carving [34,35]. Other ecosystem services include livestock grazing, provision of shade and shelter for livestock, tree fodder, and limited quantities of edible nuts and fruits, such as Manketti nuts (Schinziophyton rautanenii (Schinz) Radcl. ...