Jon Arcelus's research while affiliated with University of Nottingham and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Full-text available
Background: Transgender healthcare is a rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field. In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented increase in the number and visibility of transgender and gender diverse (TGD) people seeking support and gender-affirming medical treatment in parallel with a significant rise in the scientific literature in this are...
Article
Full-text available
Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious and disabling mental disorder with a high disease burden. In a proportion of cases, intensive hospital-based treatments, i.e. inpatient or day patient treatment, are required, with day patient treatment often being used as a ‘step-down’ treatment after a period of inpatient treatment. Demand for such tr...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Admissions to intensive treatment (i.e., inpatient [IP] and/or day patient [DP]) for individuals with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) are common. Growing literature indicates potential risks and benefits of each intensive treatment approach; however, existing research has focused on patient and carer perspectives of these treatments. Also...
Article
Background: Globally, there is a lack of a standardized assessment process prior to the initiation of gender affirming medical interventions and consequently there is a discrepancy in this process among different transgender health services. Aim: The main objective of this study is to investigate the outcome of the initial assessment process at a n...
Article
Purpose Referrals to specialist eating disorder services from the South Asian (SA) community are under-represented, despite research suggesting that disordered eating attitudes and behaviours of SA people are similar to the population in general. The study aimed to identify the reasons for this and sought to inform ways to encourage help-seeking....
Article
Background: Previous research has reported high levels of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in trans populations and younger age has been identified as a risk factor. Aims: To explore the prevalence of NSSI in a large group of young trans people, and to identify risk factors for this group. Main Outcome Measures: Socio-demographic variables and mea...
Article
Introduction. As referrals to gender identity clinics have increased dramatically over the last few years, no studies focusing on older trans people seeking treatment are available. Aims. The aim of this study was to investigate the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of older trans people attending a national service and to investigate...
Article
ABSTRACT: Literature has described high levels of mental health problems among trans people, such as depression, resulting in increased levels of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behaviour and suicidality (suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts and suicide rates). With the aim of systematically reviewing the available literature in this field, this stu...
Article
The aim of the study is to assess a mediational pathway, which includes patients' sex, personality traits, age of onset of gambling disorder (GD) and gambling-related variables. The South Oaks Gambling Screen, the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R) and the Temperament and Character Inventory-R were administered to a large sample of 1632 outpatients atten...

Citations

... Second, in the exceptional cases in which gender identity-related genital surgeries are performed in trans minors (mostly between the ages of 16 and 18), the minor in question must meet strict eligibility criteria, including having lived for "several years" with persistent gender dysphoria. 72 They must also show a firm understanding of what is at stake in the intervention, including long-term implications; and they must demonstrate sufficient cognitive and emotional maturity to provide their own informed consent or assent (i.e., affirmative agreement in conjunction with parent or guardian permission). 72 The conditions under which a young person can realistically meet these conditions is a matter of considerable debate, especially given the gaps and limitations in existing evidence regarding long-term outcomes, as these bear on the ability to be adequately informed. ...
... The pandemic hampered DP and IP services' abilities to carry out these activities and limited patients' opportunities to develop and practice transferring skills. Some clinicians suggested DPs' permanency in their home environments better facilitated the transfer of (albeit limited) skills, consistent with research suggesting DP, compared to IP, treatment may have greater applicability and allow for a better transfer of skills from treatment to one's life [11,24]. Despite success in transitioning aspects of intensive support to virtual delivery, patients may prefer in-person equivalents [21,22]. ...
... 9,10 Previous studies have shown that non-binary transgender individuals are less likely to seek GAMT at a gender clinic than binary transgender individuals. [11][12][13][14][15] It has not yet been systematically investigated whether this is truly the case because non-binary individuals have less treatment desire, as some have suggested, 16 or because they cannot access GAMT. For instance, Jones et al. 17 suggested that non-binary identifying individuals experience less body dissatisfaction and gender incongruence than binary transgender individuals, which might indicate that GAMT is less crucial for their well-being. ...
... Most empirical studies of ethnic minority patients with EDs in the UK have been conducted on patients' perspectives, with only two studies exploring the views of therapists (Chowbey, Salway, and Ismail 2012;Wales, Brewin, Raghavan, and Arcelus 2017). The perspective of therapists is therefore an under-researched area. ...
... • Poorer physical health, less physical activity and higher rates of obesity compared to LGB individuals [26]. • Later access to hormone therapy and the recognised protective mental health benefits it confers [27]. • Complex interactions between hormone therapy and co-morbidities [27]. ...
... [15,49] As reported in some studies, for example, MtF patients experience more psychological and personality disorders than female patients, face more rejection, judgment and discrimination from their families and society, and receive more strictures from society. [49][50][51] GID Service in Tavistock Center conducted a study in London, in which 36% of participants had a history of living at Authority Care and 43% had lost at least one parent as a child. [52] Another reason associated with increased risk of personality disorders is parenting style. ...
... The risk of suicidal ideation and behavior in people with atypical gender identities is higher than in the general and non-heterosexual populations (Marshall et al., 2015;Surace et al., 2020). Previous studies reported a higher risk of a Fisher's exact test; b Chi-square test; c Mann-Whitney U test, mean ± SD; NBGI-non-binary gender identity (Warren et al., 2016), and the same (Horwitz et al., 2020) prevalence. ...
... Patients with GD scored higher on general psychopathology and impulsivity measures [85], with more dysfunctional personality features (i.e., higher novelty-seeking and harm avoidance and lower reward dependence, self-directedness, cooperativeness, and self-transcendence) [85]. This profile has been linked to younger age of GD onset and problem-gambling severity [86,87]. Particularly, in our study, lower self-transcendence, and younger age, described as a possible risk factor of GD [2] also predicted the presence of GD. ...