Jolene M Hoke's research while affiliated with Archer Daniels Midland Company and other places

Publications (17)

Article
Garbanzo beans (GB; Cicer arietinum) are a readily available pulse crop that have gained popularity as a plant-based protein source in the pet food industry. However, raw GB contain anti-nutritional factors that can reduce digestibility and cause digestive upsets in pets that are undesirable to owners. The objective of this study was to determine t...
Article
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The popularity of plant-based protein sources has increased as consumer demand for grain-free and novel protein sources increase. Minimal research has been conducted as regards to use of legumes and yeast and their effects on acceptability and digestibility in canine diets. The objective of this study was to evaluate macronutrient apparent total tr...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient grains are becoming an increasingly abundant carbohydrate source in the pet food market as a result of their popularity and novelty in the human market. Thus, it is imperative to evaluate the characteristics of these ingredients in vivo. Ten adult intact female beagles were used in a replicated 5x5 Latin square design. Five dietary treatmen...
Article
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Traditionally, protein by-products from oil seeds and cereal grains have been used in pet foods as sustainable, inexpensive, and protein-rich ingredients. However, the on-going demonization of soy- and corn-based ingredients continue to hinder their use in pet food and treat formulations. Ideally, the further demonstration of their protein quality...
Article
Legumes are a popular grain-free alternative carbohydrate source in canine diets; however, information on fermentative characteristics of select legumes have not been established. Thus, the objectives of the present study were to quantify the chemical compositions and fermentative profile of select legumes using canine fecal inoculum. Five legume v...
Article
Full-text available
Legumes are a popular grain-free alternative carbohydrate source in canine diets, however, information on their fermentative characteristics have not been established. Thus, the objectives of the present study were to (1) quantify the chemical compositions and (2) fermentative profile of select legumes using canine fecal inoculum. Five legume varie...
Article
Human interest in ancient grains replacing traditional carbohydrate sources has reached the pet food market; however, chemical composition of these grains and their digestive properties in the canine model, specifically the fermentative characteristics, have not been established. Five ancient grain varieties were analyzed: amaranth (AM), white pros...
Article
Full-text available
Increased consumer interest in high-quality and novel protein sources has driven the demand for the inclusion of protein-rich ingredients in companion animal diets. Novel protein concentrates, with protein contents of at least 50%, have been used to satisfy these consumer demands. However, minimal information is available regarding the macronutrien...
Article
The rising consumer demand for alternative and sustainable protein sources drives the popularity of the use of plant-based proteins in the pet food industry. Pulse crops, which include beans, peas, lentils, and chickpeas, have become an important addition to both human and animal diets due to their protein content and functional properties. However...
Article
The human interest of ancient grains replacing modern carbohydrate sources has reached the pet food market, and there has been increased focus on corn- and wheat-free diets in pet foods. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of white and red sorghum grains on the gastrointestinal health of felines th...
Article
In recent years, ancient grains have become popular sources of novel carbohydrates and fiber in pet foods. End-products of microbial fermentation (e.g. short-chain fatty acids) have been shown to be beneficial to the canine microbiome and overall host health. However, limited research exists on the fermentation characteristics of these increasingly...
Article
Garbanzo beans (GB; Cicer arietinum) are a readily available pulse crop that have gained popularity as a plant-based protein source in the pet food industry. However, raw GB contain anti-nutritional factors that can reduce digestibility and cause effects in pets that are undesirable to owners. The objective of this study was to determine GB effects...
Article
Plant-based protein sources have gained popularity as consumer demand for grain-free and novel protein sources increase. However, minimal information is available about the effects on digestibility, gastrointestinal tolerance, and fermentative end-products of novel plant-based proteins in dogs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate...
Article
Algae can be a sustainable alternative for dietary supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (w3-PUFAs; DHA and EPA), however there is limited information on the safety and bioavailability of w3-PUFAs from algal sources in feline diets. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary supplementation of Algal-D...
Article
Plant-based proteins are under-utilized as alternative protein sources in the pet food industry. Novel plant protein sources may alleviate symptoms associated with food sensitivities, and satisfy the growing consumer demand for vegan and vegetarian pet foods. However, there is little information regarding the chemical composition and suitability of...
Article
Ancient grains are becoming increasingly popular in both the human and petfood markets today and show potential as novel fiber and carbohydrate sources. Current data suggests lower glycemic responses through their dietary inclusion as well. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the use of ancient grains in canine diets and their effect...

Citations

... Although not significantly different (P > 0.05), cats fed SW had numerically higher fecal ammonia and indole concentrations compared with SC. Previous research evaluating the effects of nutritional interventions on feline and canine gut microbiota revealed that feeding periods as short as 14 d were sufficient to shift gut microbiota and (or) their corresponding metabolites (Detweiler et al., 2019;Nogueira et al., 2019;Reilly et al., 2021). The subtle fecal microbial changes observed herein could be due to the inclusion level of insect meal at 4% of the experimental diets. ...
... One example is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast already used in commercial pet food. Its use as a protein source and as a palatability enhancer in foods for companion animals is documented [15,16]. In addition, yeast cells have a mechanism to bind thiamin for transport. ...
... These results are consistent with those of Freel et al., who reported that the feeding of defatted BSFL meal (5%, 10%, or 20%) and BSFL oil (2.5% or 5%) for 4 weeks did not affect food intake or BW in adult beagle dogs [18]. In addition, although the focus was not fermented oat, Traughber et al. reported that feeding a diet containing 40% oats did not affect food intake or BW compared with the dogs fed a diet containing 40% rice [37]. Moreover, Figure 3. ...
... The severity of the nutritional deficiencies will depend on the type of plant-based ingredients used. The use of protein isolates has potential to provide ample amino acids to fulfil the requirements of dogs and cats, making it easier to produce a complete pet food (Reilly et al., 2020) due to the high protein content in isolates. However, less refined ingredients, namely flours and concentrates, have a lower environmental impact generally and therefore align more with consumer preferences. ...
... The nutritive content and digestibility of PB ingredients commonly used in commercial pet foods have been studied extensively [9][10][11][12][13], and it is wellestablished that PB ingredients can serve as viable sources of energy, dietary fiber, digestible carbohydrates, and a variety of other essential and non-essential nutrients for dogs [2,14]. In recent years, consumer demand for alternative protein sources has prompted researchers to investigate amino acid (AA) digestibility and protein quality of several PB ingredients, such as pulses (e.g., beans, lentils), protein concentrates (e.g., pea protein, potato protein), and soy [15][16][17][18]. Using precision-fed rooster assays, Reilly and colleagues demonstrated high digestibility of all the indispensable AAs, except methionine, in selected pulse ingredients and high digestibility of all the indispensable AAs in PB protein concentrates [15,16]. ...
... Legumes are rich in galactosylsucrose oligosaccharides such as raffinose, stachyose, and verbascose (Saini, 1989). The digestibility of various legumes in a canine model has been evaluated (Carciofi et al., 2008;Forster et al., 2012;Reilly et al., 2019), however, information on fermentative characteristics of some legume varieties are lacking (Bednar et al., 2001). ...