John Kramer's research while affiliated with State University of New York College at Brockport and other places

Publication (1)

Article
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Citations

... Empirical studies that have examined the black representation-partisan link have focused on voting outcomes rather than on whether party leaders disproportionately encourage or discourage support of black candidates or whether the party organization works on behalf of the candidate. We find several I studies pointing to a slightly positive link between partisan systems and aggregate black representation (Kramer, 1971; Campbell and Feagin, 1975; Robinson and Dye, 1978), as well as two studies indicating no connection (Cole, 1974; The one study that has explored party support for black candidates found that black elected officials were more likely than white elected officials to report election help from party leaders and workers (Conyers and Wallace, 1976). Aside from this one study and the contradictory common wisdom that white party leaders' and organizations are likely to oppose black candidates, we really do not know much about party leaders' activities in this respect. ...