John Cherry's research while affiliated with University of Guelph and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Causes and water sources of flowing artesian wells attracted the interest of many hydrogeologists throughout history, however, a quantitative model that satisfactorily considers the roles of topography, groundwater recharge/discharge and aquitards on hydraulics of flowing wells is still lacking. In this study, a three-layer river-valley basin with...
Article
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The gushing of water from flowing wells attracted public attention and scientific curiosity as early as the 17th century, but little attention has been paid to the influence of flowing wells on the evolution of groundwater science. This study asserts that questions posed by flowing wells since the early 19th century led to the birth of many fundame...
Preprint
Full-text available
The spewing of groundwater in flowing wells is a phenomenon of interest to the public, but little attention has been paid to the role of flowing wells on the science of groundwater. This study reviews that answering to problems related to flowing wells since the early 19th century led to the birth of many fundamental concepts and principles of grou...

Citations

... Confined aquifers have been surveyed and studied in several places around the world for a long time, at least as early as the 19 th century, notably the water wells drilled in the Artois region of the Paris Basin (France) from which the term "artesian" is derived (Margat et al. 2013). However, the term "artesian" may cause confusion since, with proper topographic undulation, flowing artesian wells can also develop in an unconfined aquifer (Jiang et al. 2020). Freeze and Cherry (1979) identified two mechanisms for the existence of flowing artesian wells which were named "geologically controlled" and "topographically controlled" (see Fig. 1). ...
... Artesian wells hold a special place in the history of water resource management, for their proliferation at the beginning of the nineteenth century was guided by, and in turn propelled, an intensification of the modern discipline of hydrogeology. Also known by the more descriptive term "flowing wells," these wells got the name "artesian" from the Artois region around Paris in northern France where as early as the 11th century residents tapped shallow confined aquifers to produce water (Jiang et al. 2020). In the early nineteenth century the percussion method of drilling enabled a proliferation of much deeper artesian wells (Garnier 1822). ...