Jodi DeJong-Hughes's research while affiliated with University of Minnesota Duluth and other places

Publications (12)

Technical Report
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Upper Midwest Soil Compaction Guide is a regional resource for producers, college students, and agronomic personnel interested in understanding and managing soil compaction. The guide lays out the causes, consequences, and control of soil compaction and is conveniently broken into five chapters that may be read consecutively or individually. Chapt...
Article
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The Upper Midwest Tillage Guide (2nd Edition released in 2021) is a regional resource for producers and agronomic personnel who are interested in reducing tillage, but who may not feel comfortable choosing the best options for their specific operation. The guide lays out the benefits of various equipment types and tillage options and is convenientl...
Article
Soil microbial communities maintain many ecosystem functions including decomposition and symbiotic nutrient uptake. Prior field studies have focused on either geospatial or relatively large-time scale trends in these communities. Whereas, their small-time scale (e.g., weekly) dynamics in agricultural fields have largely been overlooked. Our objecti...
Article
Long winters in the Red River Valley (RRV) of eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota result in short growing seasons for corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) systems. Historically, producers implement aggressive tillage to warm the soil, which has caused hesitation when considering reduced tillage systems. The association between s...
Article
Full-text available
Economic projections after widespread deep-compaction during wet harvests are essentially nonexistent. Therefore, we project state-level economic costs to producers in North Dakota (ND) and Minnesota (MN) for the upcoming 2020 and 2021 crops. We provide economic cost graphs as functions of grain sell prices and fractions of land impacted by deep wh...
Article
Full-text available
In the upper Midwest, the narrow growing season cause many farmers to presume yield losses when reducing tillage. The purpose of this study was to determine how four production-scale tillage systems affects residue cover, stand populations, crop yields, and soil chemical, biological, and physical properties. Tillage systems [chisel plow (CP), fall...
Article
Full-text available
Near-surface soil water content (SWC) and its spatial patterns are important for landscape hydrological responses to precipitation as well as our ability to remotely sense and model such responses. Our objective was to measure and evaluate near-surface SWC semivariograms of agricultural fields with newly imposed (i.e., <2 yr) side-by-side soil and...
Article
Excerpt Soil tillage is one of the most common management practices in any crop production system across the world. Over the centuries, tillage tools have evolved from simple tools for preparing a soft, weed-free area for easy planting to sophisticated implements for managing high levels of crop residues, facilitating the warming of frigid soils, a...

Citations

... Second, moldboard plow is no longer a common conventional till system particularly in the US Corn Belt. Chisel plow, a less aggressive tool, has mostly replaced moldboard plow and is a conventional tillage system in some regions (DeJong-Hughes and Daigh, 2018). Thus, the lack of statistical differences in soil-profile SOC stocks between NT and chisel plow suggests that NT does not necessarily accumulate more SOC stocks than conventional tillage. ...
... In a frigid environment, such as that in the Northern Great Plains, these concerns are more pronounced, as crop residue tends to accumulate when high residue crops (corn, small grains) are left on the soil surface as a result of no-till practices. Alghamdi et al. [5] examined soil warming and drying in a frigid environment for corn-soybean systems and provided evidence to suggest that these perceived delays are not related to moisture and temperature of the soil. Daigh et al. [6] have also reported research on full-production scale farms in the Red River Valley of Minnesota and North Dakota (i.e., frigid environment), finding that producer perceptions of delayed warming and drying of the soil do not translate into yield losses. ...
... In this paper, our results confirm that bacterial communities are insensitive to diversification of cropping systems not only in the canola rhizosphere, but also in its roots and bulk soil ( Table 2). This could be explained by the fact that, in our case, bacteria could be more influenced by soil physical properties and weather conditions than by crop rotations [46]. A contrario, the composition of the fungal communities in canola roots, rhizosphere, and bulk soil appeared to be sensitive to cropping systems diversification. ...
... fractal dimensions), when the farmer increases the diversity of root system architectures (i.e. diversity of crop species with fibrous and tap root morphologies, concentration reduction and pre-emption strategies and root-shoot signalling responses to environmental variables) grown in that soil (Dabney 1998;Unger and Vigil 1998;Ilstedt et al. 2007;Kumar et al. 2008;Skaggs and Shouse 2008;Bengough 2012;Hallett et al. 2013;Daigh et al. 2014bDaigh et al. , 2018aDaigh et al. , 2020Basche et al. 2016;Hunt 2016;DeLonge 2017, 2019;Manns and Martin 2018;Acharya et al. 2019;Alhameid et al. 2019;Lu et al. 2020;Meyer et al. 2020). A greater number of cycles of diverse plants will lead to more complex and stable soil pore networks, until a new equilibrium is reached (Fig. 5.1). ...
... We observed high r 2 values in areas with low residue cover (<10%) and lower r 2 values in areas with high residue cover. Residue cover on the soil surface not only limits soil erosion due to water and air but also changes soil moisture spatial patterns within fields (Dabney 1998;Daigh et al. 2019). Studies have shown that the reduction of soil evaporation due to residue cover maintains higher soil moisture contents at field level over time (Dabney 1998;Unger and Vigil 1998). ...
... Moreover, many farmer anecdotes can be heard around the world, along with experimental evidence, that enhanced crop diversity creates soils that are strong and hold up their agricultural equipment better than fields that have been monocropped and aggressively tilled for residue management (Chamen et al. 2003;Blanco-Canqui et al. 2011). These characteristics and their effects on soil water are not only gained in the vertical direction, but are also distinct horizontally across the fields, where plants may create small, localised mosaic zones in the soil where their root systems modulate soil hydraulic properties and water contents (Daigh et al. 2018b). However, small-scale local changes in the subsoils have a magnifying effect that emerge when the processes are scaled up to the watershed level (Dabney 1998). ...
... The above-and below-ground morphology of each crop affects how it responds to a field's antecedent moisture and drainage conditions (Fidantemiz et al. 2019;Nichols et al. 2019) and subsequent impacts on soil water. If tillage is used in the system, then the mode, depth and aggressiveness will also have contributing effects (Daigh and DeJong-Hughes 2017;O'Brien and Daigh 2019). The spatial and temporal arrangement of species within a cropping system combined with the tillage system has a major influence on soil hydrology and water balance dynamics. ...