Joana Aragay's research while affiliated with Institut Botànic de Barcelona and other places

Publications (3)

Article
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The Atlantic-Mediterranean marine transition is a fascinating biogeographic region, but still very poorly studied from the point of view of seaweed phylogeography. Dictyota fasciola and D. mediterranea (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae) are two currently recognized sister species that share a large part of their distribution along the Mediterranean Sea an...
Article
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ABSTRACTDictyota cyanoloma has recently been described from the Mediterranean Sea and Macaronesia but doubt had arisen as to whether this species was truly native in Europe. The species is mainly found on non-natural substrata (harbour walls, marinas, boat hulls, etc.), strongly suggesting that it is an introduction. Molecular sequence information...
Article
Full-text available
Dictyota cyanoloma, a distinctive brown algal species characterized by a blue-iridescent margin, was recently reported as an introduced species in the Mediterranean Sea (Steen et al., 2016) but little is known about its distribution dynamics, morphological plasticity and genetic structure. In the present integrative study, we evaluate its past and...

Citations

... This conclusion is in agreement with several recent investigations on other Mediterranean seaweeds, which have shown great genetic diversity and some striking cases of cryptic speciation (e.g. De Jode et al., 2019;Pezzolesi et al., 2019;Vitales et al., 2019). Taken together, these studies support the role of the Mediterranean as a hotspot of genetic diversity for marine organisms, a scenario supported by numerous phylogeographic investigations (Patarnello et al., 2007, and references therein;Pascual et al., 2017). ...
... Also, in the Southern Hemisphere D. cyanoloma lives in natural rocky habitats, and in European waters it occurs in non-natural environments such as commercial ports and marinas only. For these reasons the aforementioned authors concluded that, although the type locality of the species is in the Mediterranean, it is actually a Southern Australia and New Zealand species, a conclusion supported by other authors (Aragay et al., 2016) as well. Therefore, in European waters it should be considered an introduced species, as we accept in this paper. ...
... The global transfer of marine species by human-mediated means is of significant concern for biodiversity conservation and the sustainable development of coastal and oceanic resources [1]. Some introduced species can become invasive, and their impacts on local ecosystems might be devastating [2]. Introduced species from all major animal, plants and alga phyla have been detected around the globe [1]. ...