Jiseon Shin's research while affiliated with Sungkyunkwan University and other places

Publications (21)

Article
Full-text available
This study investigates whether the degree of materialistic rewards perceived by employees leads to creative behavior for organizational change, and identifies possible mechanisms, focusing on normative change commitment. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship between material compensation provided by an organization and employees’ normativ...
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This study investigates the positive and negative effects of developmental job experience (DJE) on employees’ innovative behavior. Relying on transactional stress theory, we hypothesize the mediating roles of psychological capital and burnout in the relationship between DJE and innovative behavior as assessed by team leaders. The results reveal tha...
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This study examines how group diversity affects individual group members’ negative gossip about their colleagues and how this linkage is altered by group structure. We hypothesize that group diversity in terms of organizational tenure reduces individual negative gossip about coworkers, and that the diversity–gossip linkage is moderated by a self-ma...
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How can employees of multinational corporations (MNCs) who are dispersed in various locations around the globe feel included? Integrating social capital theory and the MNC literature regarding resource and status differences between employees located in headquarter (HQ) versus non-HQ (i.e., subsidiary) country locations, we examined the role of the...
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Despite the growing phenomenon of social entrepreneurship, the existing literature has limited quantitative findings on its determinants. This study examines the psychological origins of social entrepreneurial behavior based on the motivated information processing theory. Our structural equation modeling analysis of 179 nascent social entrepreneurs...
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Gossip is a ubiquitous phenomenon found in organisational life but has been under-researched within organisational literature. Our study elaborates on the multidimensional nature of workplace gossip in terms of valence (i.e., positive and negative) and targets (i.e., supervisors and organisations). We derive perceived justice and insider status as...
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of empowering leadership at the team level on employees’ subjective well-being (SWB) and work performance through perceived social support. Based on social exchange theory (Blau, 1964), the study identifies the mediating effects of perceived social support in the relationship between empow...
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Research in entrepreneurship decision making assumes that entrepreneurs use a relatively distinct decision-making process when it comes to market entry. Building on a biased comparative-judgment-formation framework and egocentrism theory, this article theorizes a model of entrepreneurs’ egocentric market entry decisions. Specifically, we illustrate...
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This article addresses the theoretical limitations of social network theory as it applies to individual creativity. Social network theory implicitly assumes that social interactions influence creativity identically for all individuals in all circumstances. We argue that the extent to which individuals take advantage of their social ties may vary de...
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Via a longitudinal study of organizational change, we found that employees’ later commitment to change, in both affective and normative forms, was generally greater when they initially felt more rather than less commitment to change and that more commitment to change was sustained over time when employees perceived their leaders to have provided mo...
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We explored the effects of direction and frequency of social comparison on employees' work attitudes. Full-time employees (N = 403) of 23 different organizations from various industries completed a paper-and-pencil survey. We found that people with a low core self-evaluation and a high performance approach tended to engage in social comparison freq...
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Gossip is ubiquitous in organizational life but has been under-researched in the organizational literature. We extend justice research to identify antecedents of gossip at work and explore a moderator on the justice-gossip linkage. Our analysis of 329 nurses demonstrates that organization-directed (i.e., procedural and distributive) justice percept...
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We tested the importance of two hypothesized resources-organizational inducements and employee psychological resilience-in determining employees' commitment to, and supportive behaviors for, organizational change. Conducting a two-wave survey in a sample of 234 employees and 45 managers, we found that organizational inducements and resilience were...
Article
In order to adjust, expatriates working abroad must form network ties in the host country to obtain critical informational and emotional support resources. We present a five-stage process model that delineates how expatriates form adjustmentfacilitating support ties in a culturally unfamiliar context. We then provide propositions about how the prog...
Article
In order to adjust, expatriates working abroad must form network ties in the host country to obtain critical informational and emotional support resources. We present a five-stage process model that delineates how expatriates form adjustment-facilitating support ties in a culturally unfamiliar context. We then provide propositions about how the pro...

Citations

... Indeed, target's negative gossip mainly causes negative experiences that promote more reactive in cognitive, emotional and behavioral ways depending on negative stimuli or events. Such negative stimuli or events are more likely to encourage reciprocal counter behavior, such as knowledge hiding (Kim et al., 2021;Zhao et al., 2016). When employees trickle with uncertainty for their interests, they often initiate gossip about targets to gather social information while recovering their adverse reactions by hurting them . ...
... Therefore, college students, influenced by PTG, may show greater prosocial tendencies after experiencing trauma due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Kim et al. (2020) examined 179 Korean entrepreneurs who experienced traumatic events to explore the psychological causes that compelled them to start their businesses. The authors observed that prosocial tendency promoted entrepreneurial intention. ...
... Previous extant literature evidenced that individuals' gossip occurred during 14% of coffee breaks and 66% of employees' communication about colleagues, social topics and third parties (Kong, 2018). Furthermore, Kim et al. (2019) and Xie et al. (2018, July) argued that almost 90% of employees gossip about others in the workplace setting. As negative gossip has plentiful unusual influences than positive gossip, most employees enjoy gossiping about coworkers negatively (Kurland and Pelled, 2000). ...
... Scholars have explored the effectiveness of inclusive leadership; however, these studies have mainly focused on the individual level, such as adaptability, performance, and engagement of employees (Hirak et al., 2012;Choi et al., 2014Choi et al., , 2017Randel et al., 2018). In addition, the existing literature studies the relationship among inclusive leadership and psychological safety (Kim et al., 2018), employees' psychological capital and innovative work Frontiers in Psychology | www.frontiersin.org 3 July 2022 | Volume 13 | Article 877725 behavior (Javed et al., 2017), strengthens the employee s' sense of belonging (Randel et al., 2018), improve the employees' creativity (Zhu et al., 2019). ...
... Positive perceptions of willingness to help and intensification of support interactions (cf., Nebus, 2006;Reichers, 1987) create a momentum that acts as social glue binding the parties closer together (Ferris et al., 2009). This, in turn, creates the potential for high-quality (Korte, 2010) work relationships spanning multiple support types and dimensions (e.g., informational and social support; Farh et al., 2010;Saks & Gruman, 2012). ...
... First, the commitment to organizational change is based on the concept of organizational commitment. The difference between organizational commitment and commitment to organizational change is that the focus is not on a wide range of organizations, but on a specific process of change [32]. Based on the concept of organizational commitment, Herscovitch and Meyer [33] first presented the concept of commitment to organizational change and described commitment as affective, continuing, and normative. ...
... However, the expectations of entrepreneurs vary significantly with respect to their investment intentions and desired profitability (March, 1999). Many authors indicate the importance of the principles of social cognitive theory when considering both expectations of success and the perception of success itself, not just as elements which propitiate the acceleration of internal learning systems, but also for the achievement of success (Shin & Kim, 2019). This focus is supported by different ...
... It is a rather novel empirical insight that access to higher status individuals increases emotional support as well. Research on cross-border interaction within MNCs shows the importance of being connected to high-status individuals in order to increase feelings of belonging (Farh, Liao, Shapiro, Shin, & Guan, 2020), thus increasing emotional comfort. Building on the existing evidence, we therefore hypothesize about career status differences, keeping other factors constant: ...
... Perry-Smith & Mannucci, 2015). Few studies have tested the interaction effect between individual personality and social networks (Kim et al., 2018). According to trait activation theory, traits must be aroused by trait-relevant situational cues (Tett & Guterman, 2000). ...
... Recently, many studies have increasingly suggesting that managers should improve their management skills to reduce NWG spreading (Kuo et al., 2015;Wu et al., 2018aWu et al., , 2018b. Unfortunately, little previous research has systematically explored the relation between leaders and NWG (Brady, Brown, & Liang, 2017;Kim, Moon, & Shin, 2019;Kuo et al., 2015;Wu et al., 2018a) and provided theoretical explanations and empirical evidence for coping with NWG occurrence (Kim, Moon, & Shin, 2019). Also, existing research on workplace gossip tends to present an overly simplistic view (Tassiello, Lombardi, & Costabile, 2018). ...