Jinlu Li's research while affiliated with Lanzhou University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Recent fieldwork allows a revision of the loaches of the genus Triplophysa inhabiting the Tarim Basin in Xinjiang, China. Eleven species were previously recorded. T. stewarti is a new record. Triplophysa papilloso-labiatus should be regarded as a valid species name. Triplophysa laterimaculata sp. n. was collected from the Kezile River, a tributary...
Article
Recent fieldwork allows a revision of the loaches of the genus Triplophysa inhabiting the Tarim Basin in Xinjiang, China. Eleven species were previously recorded. T. stewarti is a new record. Triplophysa papilloso-labiatus should be regarded as a valid species name. Triplophysa laterimaculata sp. n. was collected from the Kezile River, a tributary...
Article
We examined elevational and environmental aspects of body size variation in the Qinghai toad-headed lizard, Phrynocephalus vlangalii, using principal component analysis (PCA) of 9 morphological traits taken from 565 lizards from 17 pop-ulations. The first principal component (PC1) accounted for 67% of the size variation in males and 62% in females....

Citations

... The specimens examined in the present study were deposited in a collection of the School of Life Sciences, Southwest (Turdakov, 1955), Triplophysa ulacholica (Anikin, 1905 and Triplophysa coniptera (Turdakov, 1954) are cited from Turdakov (1963); Triplophysa sewerzowi (Nikolskii, 1938) from Mitrofanov (1989); Triplophysa dorsonotatus (Kessler, 1879) from Kessler (1879); and Triplophysa kungessana (Kessler, 1879) from Zhao (1984). Data on Triplophysa species from the Tarim basin: Triplophysa laterimaculata Li, Liu and Yang, 2007; Triplophysa papillosolabiata (Kessler, 1879); Triplophysa bombifrons (Herzenstein, 1888); Triplophysa zamegacephala (Zhao, 1985); (2007) and Triplophysa herzensteini (Berg, 1909) and Triplophysa microphthalma (Kessler, 1879) from Cao and Zhang (2008). Data on Triplophysa kashmirensis (Hora, 1922) are cited from Kullander et al. (1999). ...
... However, S. grammicus lizards are larger in the warmer elevations with higher whole organism RMR, and rather appear to lower energetic costs by lowering mass specific RMR, whereas S. grammicus at high (cold) elevations are much smaller (Table 1; see also Díaz de la Vega-Pérez et al. 2019) with lower whole organism RMR. Growth may be restricted by limited food abundance and short thermal windows for foraging at high elevations (Jin et al. 2007;Theisinger et al. 2017) and a small body size in ectotherms may favor thermoregulation by reducing heating time Žagar et al. 2018). Liolaemid lizards present smaller body size and tend to resort to herbivory at cold sites (Espinoza et al. 2004), which coincides with findings in S. grammicus that are small and include plants in their diet at the high elevation study site (Montoya-Ciriaco et al. 2020). ...