Jillian Du's research while affiliated with World Resources Institute and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Global monitoring efforts do not provide a clear picture of the challenge of managing human waste at the city scale. Where cities do not provide universal access to publicly managed sanitation systems, households and communities find their own solutions resulting in a patchwork of approaches to removing human waste from places where people live. In...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is happening differently today than in the past and occurring most rapidly in places with the fewest resources. Traditional approaches are not able to keep up, leaving billions of people with poor access to basic necessities, dragging down economies and damaging the environment. This synthesis report of the Towards a More Equal City se...
Article
Full-text available
Cities in Africa face escalating water-related challenges, compounded by worsening climate change and rising urbanization. Water insecurity threatens economies, livelihoods and the health and wellbeing of billions. The answer: smart, systematic investments in urban water resilience that ensure communities have safe, reliable and affordable water; a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Cities are increasingly integrating climate adaptation priorities into development policies and plans. However, there remains a gap in understanding how incremental urban adaptation solutions can lead to more transformative change over the long term. Transformative adaptation reorients urban climate actions around addressing entrenched equity and...

Citations

... At the same time, several institutional arrangements involving stakeholders in the informal water sector, from organized neighborhood water committees to unionized water vendors, suggest that cooperation among multiple institutional actors across scales can influence the politics and practice of informal services delivery (Marston 2014;Wutich, Beresford, and Carvajal 2016). Similarly, in cities where homes are not connected to sewers, the responsibility of managing on-site fecal sludge falls on households and private providers, often promoting risky sanitation practices (Beard et al. 2022). Compared with wealthier households, coping costs are typically higher for lowincome households (Majuru, Suhrcke, and Hunter 2016). ...
... The way people experience the city is shaped by their connection to services and opportunities; although this can be subjective, we conduct an objective analysis in this paper to quantify this connection to services. Mahendra et al. (2022) point out that unequal access to high-quality, reliable, and affordable infrastructure and essential services reduces productivity, which leads to health problems, environmental damages, and, the focus of our study, socially excludes inhabitants for generations. ...
... If we focus for a moment on Elpis rather than the other troubles released from the box, we should note that there is now greater awareness of the climate crisis and its impact on the home of the majority of the human population, the cities of the world. It is in cities of the world where adaptation and mitigation policies are being most tried and tested [79]. That leaves us with the intriguing possibility that cities are both the cause of many of our problems of climate change but could also be a solution [80,81]. ...