Jill Hahn's research while affiliated with Massachusetts Hospital School and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Full-text available
Purpose The stress-sensitization hypothesis posits that individuals with prior trauma are at elevated risk for poor mental health when faced with subsequent stressors. Little work has examined whether those who have demonstrated psychological resilience to prior trauma would show either increased resilience or vulnerability to subsequent stressors....
Article
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Objective To investigate whether vitamin D and marine derived long chain omega 3 fatty acids reduce autoimmune disease risk. Design Vitamin D and omega 3 trial (VITAL), a nationwide, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial with a two-by-two factorial design. Setting Nationwide in the United States. Participants 25 871 participants, co...
Article
Objective We investigated whether a healthy lifestyle, defined by a healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS), was associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk, overall and seropositive/seronegative subtypes. Methods We analyzed female nurses in Nurses' Health Study (NHS, 1986-2016) and NHSII (1991-2017). Lifestyle and medical information were collec...
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Objective While the association between individual factors related to lifestyle and the risk of SLE has been previously evaluated, it is unclear how the combination of these factors might affect the risk of incident SLE. We prospectively evaluated whether a combination of healthy lifestyle factors is associated with lower risk of incident SLE and i...
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Full-text available
Prenatal maternal exposure to air pollution may cause adverse health effects in offspring, potentially through altered immune responses. Maternal psychosocial distress can also alter immune function and may increase gestational vulnerability to air pollution exposure. We investigated whether prenatal exposure to air pollution is associated with alt...
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Objective: We investigated the association of depression with subsequent risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by serologic phenotype. Methods: We performed a cohort study using pooled data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, 1992-2014) and NHSII (1993-2015). Depression was defined using a composite definition: clinician diagnosis, regular antidepre...
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Background Smoking has been associated with increased systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) risk, but the biologic basis for this association is unknown. We investigated whether women’s smoking was positively associated with SLE‐associated pro‐inflammatory chemokines/cytokines, [stem cell factor (SCF), B‐lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), interferon‐induci...
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Full-text available
Objectives Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with decreased systemic lupus erythematosus risk, but the biologic basis for this association is unknown. We aimed to determine whether moderate alcohol consumption was associated with lower concentrations of systemic lupus erythematosus-associated chemokines/cytokines in an ongoing cohort...
Article
Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the association of lifetime maternal depression with regulation of immune responses in the infant, measured by cytokine levels and lymphocyte proliferation (LP) in cord blood mononuclear cells collected at delivery. Methods: We studied women recruited in early pregnancy into the Project Viva longitu...

Citations

... 95% CI: −0.44 to −0.33; p < 0.001); however, the correlation was lower than pre-pandemic (r = −0.61) [91]. Studies reported that resilience was significantly negatively related to psychological distress among female nurses [92] and rescue workers [93]. ...
... Recently, the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL), a nationwide, randomized, blind, placebo-controlled trial with 25.871 participants revealed that VitD3 supplementation, with or without omega 3 fatty acids, taken over five years, reduced autoimmune disease (AID) by 22%, while omega 3 fatty acid intake decreased AIT by 15% (statistically nonsignificant) [67]. Of note, both treatment arms showed larger effects than the reference arms (VitD3 placebo and omega 3 fatty acid placebo). ...
... Recently, the Nurses Health Study (NHS) cohorts were analyzed with respect to the impact of modifiable lifestyle factors (cigarette smoking, being obese, lacking physical activity and consuming unhealthy diets, as well as drinking alcohol in excess) on the risk of RA. A healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS) was developed to quantify these five factors [4]. In general, a higher (healthier) HLIS was associated with a lower hazard ratio (HR) for RA, most prominently in women with five healthy lifestyle factors (HR 0.42), which was even lower for seropositive RA (HR 0.24) [4]. ...
... RWD-EHR have led to findings such as the association between EBV exposure and multiple sclerosis development in the US military data, autoantibodies preceding SLE, as well as lifestyle and SLE development. [8][9][10][11] RWD-EHR can also capture data surrounding the time disease development compared with studies with fixed visits of trials and cohorts. In addition, the number of dimensions or types of data measured in the real world tends to be higher than RCT or observational cohort studies; EHR data contains all data collected as part of clinical care on all patients who visited a clinic or healthcare system. ...
... Prenatal exposure to moderate levels of air pollution may lead to changes in cord blood cytokine levels in healthy infants, including reduced IL-10, as well as increased IL-1β and IL-6 (García- Serna et al., 2022;Latzin et al., 2011). Furthermore, lower production of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 in cord blood mononuclear cells from newborns prenatally exposed to higher levels of PM 2.5 has been demonstrated in newborns from the US Project Viva cohort (Hahn et al., 2021). The inconsistency in previous findings may partially be attributed to methodological differences (i.e., sample size, model specifications, exposure assessment) and to the actual levels of exposure to air pollutants. ...
... The influence of depression on the development of arthritis is exemplified in RA, in which it is the most frequent comorbidity, and is responsible for a dramatic effect on quality of life 81,82 . In addition, results from population-based studies have shown that depression is associated with elevation of the risk of developing RA, with any protective role of antidepressant medication being unclear 83,84 . This association is not epidemiologically and pathophysiologically limi ted to adulthood 85,86 . ...
... (128), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a), and IL-6 (140,141). Among positive ANA women, elevated BLyS and lower IL-10 (an antiinflammatory cytokine) levels could be found among current smokers (142). Both TNF-a and IL-6 also play important roles in the modulation of insulin resistance (121). ...
... Despite this caveat, immune dysregulation noted in LAUREL was largely recapitulated in the confirmatory LFRR cohort. Despite being able to tease out type 2 symptoms in both cohorts, other self-reported data, such as smoking (96) and alcohol consumption (97), were not widely available for analysis in the current study. That being said, a previous study assessing a subset of SLE patients, lupus relatives, and healthy controls with available self-reported smoking data in the LFRR found no association with increased autoantibody production (98). ...
... Instead, our findings indicate that women's psychological symptoms during pregnancy may contribute more to the development of medical problems for the neonate than to shorter length of gestation. Other emerging evidence supports the potential impact that maternal psychological distress may have on the developing fetus, suggesting impairments in fetal brain biochemistry and brain growth [50,51] as well as neonatal immunity [52,53]. Such alterations have clear implications for neonatal morbidity, including the need for resuscitation and higher incidence of neonatal infections we found among infants whose mothers had more symptoms of psychological distress. ...