Jia Li's research while affiliated with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other places

Publications (16)

Article
Full-text available
Secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure contributes to ill health and disease, including heart disease, lung cancer, and stroke (1). Although cigarette smoking has declined among U.S. workers, workplace exposure to SHS remains high, particularly among workers in certain industries, such as construction (2,3). Implementation of smoke-free laws has p...
Article
Introduction: Approximately 60% of the U.S. adult population is employed. Many aspects of a person's job may influence health, but it is unclear which job characteristics are most strongly associated with health at a population level. The purpose of this study was to identify important associations between job characteristics and workers' self-rat...
Article
Objective To estimate the prevalence of a comprehensive set of self-reported sleep problems by job characteristics, including shiftwork status, among a representative sample of US workers. Methods Data for 6338 workers aged ≥18 years were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Short sleep duration was defined as <7 hou...
Article
Background Hearing loss and tinnitus are two potentially debilitating physical conditions affecting many people in the United States. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of hearing difficulty, tinnitus, and their co-occurrence within U.S. populations. Methods Data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were exami...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To explore associations between self-reported hypertension and workplace psychosocial factors that are common among U.S. workers and to identify industries and occupations (I&Os) that are associated with a high prevalence of hypertension, even after adjustment for common known risk factors.Methods Data from the 2010 National Health Interv...
Article
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Workplace stress likely plays a role in health disparities; however, applying standard measures to studies of immigrants requires thoughtful consideration. The goal of this study was to determine the appropriateness of two measures of occupational stressors ('decision latitude' and 'job demands') for use with mostly immigrant Latino farm workers. C...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose To estimate and interpret differences in depression prevalence rates among industries, using a large, group medical claims database. Methods Depression cases were identified by ICD-9 diagnosis code in a population of 214,413 individuals employed during 2002–2005 by employers based in western Pennsylvania. Data were provided by Highmark,...
Article
Full-text available
During an influenza pandemic, information about the industry and occupation (I&O) of persons likely to be infected with influenza virus is important to guide key policy decisions regarding vaccine prioritization and exposure-control measures. Health-care personnel (HCP) might have increased opportunity for exposure to influenza infection, and they...
Article
Full-text available
Along with public health and clinical professionals, employers are taking note of rising obesity rates among their employees, as obesity is strongly related to chronic health problems and concomitant increased healthcare costs. Contributors to the obesity epidemic are complex and numerous, and may include several work characteristics. To explore as...
Article
Full-text available
To determine the prevalence of cigarette smoking cessation and examine the association between cessation and various factors among workers in a nationally representative sample of US adults. Data were derived from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Prevalence rates were calculated for interest in quitting smoking, making an attempt to quit...
Conference Paper
Background and Objectives: Several studies have suggested associations between hypertension and certain work organization and psychosocial occupational exposures, but most of these have been small and/or restricted to specific industry or occupational groups. The goal of this study was to explore these associations among a nationally representative...
Article
Full-text available
To help address underrecognition of occupational illnesses and support planning of workplace health initiatives. Data from Highmark Inc., a health care insurer headquartered in Pittsburgh and Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, was used to calculate age and gender-adjusted rates of 15 diseases by industry and broad industry sector. Significant industry differ...
Article
Previous studies report that truck drivers are at increased risk for illness and on-the-job mortality. It is unknown whether owner-operator truck drivers face the same risks as employee drivers, yet few studies have targeted owner-operators as a study population. This study examined the overall and cause-specific mortality ratios for a cohort with...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies report that truck drivers are at increased risk for illness and on-the-job mortality. It is unknown whether owner-operator truck drivers face the same risks as employee drivers, yet few studies have targeted owner-operators as a study population. This study examined the overall and cause-specific mortality ratios for a cohort with...
Article
The purpose of this study was to collect baseline prevalence data on the health problems faced by minority, white, and female farm operators. An occupational health survey of farm operators was conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service between February and August 2000. A stratified random sample of fa...

Citations

... Considering the dynamic environment of the road, impaired visual ability makes driving challenging and elevates the risk of traffic crashes. Hence, truckers qualify as a vulnerable occupational group needing urgent attention (10)(11)(12)(13)(14)(15). Correction of even low refractive errors in truckers can help minimize adverse events (6,16). ...
... First, potential ETE increases with use prevalence, and ENDS users are likely to use products in homes and vehicles around people of similar racial/ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. The literature supports this assumption: EJ populations have higher SHS exposure partly due to smoking rates and places of domicile and employment [28][29][30]. Second, ENDS use susceptibility may influence future use among non-users and experimental ENDS users. ...
... While a fraction of this gap is explained by the fact that healthier people are more likely to be employed (Schmitz, 2011), employer-sponsored insurance is the predominant source of health insurance in the U.S. and thus, access to healthcare (Carman, Eibner, & Paddock, 2015). In addition, other dimensions of employment such as work organization, job insecurity, and length of unemployment are associated with both health status and life expectancy (Laditka & Laditka, 2016;Landsbergis, Grzywacz, & Lamontagne, 2014;Luckhaupt, Alterman, Li, & Calvert, 2017). Given the impact of employment on adult health, and the relationship between education and employment on adult SES trajectories, the association between youth employment, education, and training on health is crucial to expand our understanding of adult health disparities. ...
... A similar proportion of individuals report working nights at least once a month [3]. Regularly working nights or rotating shifts was reported by as much as 12-13% of North American workers [4,5]. Importantly, roughly half of the exposed workers in North America and Europe are women [3,6,7]. ...
... Tinnitus, sound-induced auditory fatigue, and sound sensitivity were perceived as common symptoms, and the participants described that these symptoms were caused by the work situation. Regarding previous research on health effects of occupational noise exposure, noiseinduced hearing loss and tinnitus may affect workers in many sectors, from construction to the social services to preschools [2,[25][26][27]. Of high relevance for the current study, our previous research among preschool teachers and obstetrics personnel showed an increased risk of several hearing-related symptoms, such as difficulty perceiving speech, tinnitus, hyperacusis and a symptom we termed "sound-induced auditory fatigue" [8,10,28]. ...
... There is increasing evidence that job insecurity may act as a workrelated stressor and can, therefore, be detrimental to both the mental and somatic health of those affected . To date, job insecurity has been linked to a number of adverse health outcomes such as depression (Theorell et al. 2015), impaired subjective well-being (Schütte et al. 2014), coronary heart disease (Virtanen et al. 2013), hypertension (Kaur et al. 2014), emotional exhaustion (Geuskens et al. 2012) and lower self-rated health (László et al. 2010). The majority of studies has used self-reports to measure both stress and health-related outcomes and there is a lack of studies which employ both subjective as well as objective measures (Cheng and Chan 2008;De Witte et al. 2016;Näswall et al. 2012;, which would allow for a better understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms. ...
... The JD-R may aid in the understanding of how to accomplish this goal (29). While the JD-R model has been applied to Latin American agricultural workers who have migrated to work in other countries (30), it has not been applied to agricultural workers residing in Latin America. ...
... Several studies have highlighted the association of perceived job insecurity and cardiovascular disease risk factors, but these studies have focused primarily on the overall population and they have not accounted for social factors important to Latinx [23][24][25][26]. Although prior research has found that nativity and acculturation-related processes are associated with hypertension [27,28], little research exists examining how work influences hypertension risk among Latinx. ...
... Occupation-speci c aspects are likely to play a role in employees' preferences regarding the above mentioned organisational aspects of psychotherapeutic consultation at work and consequently regarding its acceptance and utilisation [38,39]. For instance, previous research shows that the prevalence of mental illnesses varies between different occupational areas [40]. In particular, occupations with regular customer contact (e.g. ...
... Previous literature on the association between occupation and respiratory tract infections is still rather limited and focuses on the risk of in uenza or in uenza like illness. [10][11][12][13][14] The risk has been explained by different frequencies of contacts with other people, contact with contaminated surfaces at work or by work-related stress. 14 A recent register-based study found that people working in occupations with high person-to-person contact, such as work in day care, sewers, public transportation, and nursing and home care, had an increased risk of being hospitalized with pneumonia or in uenza compared to people working within public administration. ...