Jessica Lewis's research while affiliated with Kansas Department of Health and Environment and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Full-text available
Background Exposure to household air pollution results in a substantial global health burden. The World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Household Fuel Combustion stipulate emission rates for household energy devices should meet air quality guidelines and protect health. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biogas, natural gas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Exposure to household air pollution results in a substantial global health burden. The World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Household Fuel Combustion stipulate emission rates for household energy devices should meet air quality guidelines and protect health. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biogas, natural gas...
Article
Full-text available
Household air pollution generated from the use of polluting cooking fuels and technologies is a major source of disease and environmental degradation in low- and middle-income countries. Using a novel modelling approach, we provide detailed global, regional and country estimates of the percentages and populations mainly using 6 fuel categories (ele...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, approximately 3 billion primarily cook using inefficient and poorly vented combustion devices, leading to unsafe levels of household air pollution (HAP) in and around the home. Such exposures contribute to nearly 4 million deaths annually (WHO 2018a, 2018b ). Characterizing the effectiveness of interventions for reducing HAP concentration...
Preprint
Full-text available
Household air pollution generated from the use of polluting cooking fuels and technologies is a major source of disease and environmental degradation in low- and middle-income countries. Using a novel modelling approach, we provide global, regional and country estimates for 6 specific fuel categories (electricity, gaseous fuels, kerosene, biomass,...
Article
Full-text available
In 2017 an estimated 3 billion people used polluting fuels and technologies as their primary cooking solution, with 3.8 million deaths annually attributed to household exposure to the resulting fine particulate matter air pollution. Currently, health burdens are calculated by using aggregations of fuel types, e.g. solid fuels, as country level esti...
Preprint
Globally, an estimated 3.8 million deaths per year can be attributed to household air pollution. Information on the proportion of people relying primarily on different polluting fuels for cooking, which acts as a proxy for pollution exposure, is available in the form of nationally-representative household surveys. However, the absence of a modellin...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Household Air Pollution (HAP) Measurements database, commissioned by the World Health Organization, provides an organized summary of data reported in the literature describing HAP microenvironments, methods and measurements. As of June 2018, the database contains measurements from 43 countries obtained from 196 studies published through...

Citations

... Nearly half of the global population use polluting cooking fuels (such as firewood, charcoal, coal and dung) and the future projections of observed trends suggest 31% of the global population will still rely on polluting fuels for cooking by 2030 [1].However, studies (such as ( [2][3][4][5][6]; World Health Statistics, 2021) warn that the use of solid fuels cause household air pollution, which is responsible for over 3.5 million premature deaths worldwide [7]. Furthermore, there is evidence that increased consumption of wood fuels (charcoal and firewood) leads to environmental degradation [8] and deforestation, hence contribute to climate change problems. ...
... Motor vehicles are the primary source of manmade oxide production in cities. Of course, industrial activities and fuel combustion in commercial facilities, heat and waste incinerators, and any fire, such as a forest fire, contribute to the production of this gas (Pope et al., 2021). Carbon monoxide is a toxic and dangerous substance that causes blood poisoning, choking, and death (Mosadegh, 2011). ...
... Importantly, extant works on energy access focus on binary variables related to electrification. There seems to be scant works in understanding the cooking fuel accessibility at microregional scale, as current studies [15,16] focus on global and country-wide access of clean cooking fuels. ...
... The proportion of PM exposure from solid fuels at the individual level was then modeled using linear, spatiotemporal, and Gaussian regression threestep modeling strategy. The individual excess PM exposure due to using solid fuels was estimated by a linear model using the study database from the Global Household Air Pollution measurement database from WHO (Shupler et al. 2018a). The level of HAP exposure due to combustion of solid fuels was then estimated using a Bayesian, hierarchical model based on the excess HAP data aforementioned (GBD 2019Risk Factors Collaborators 2020, Shupler et al. 2018b. ...