Jessica Leete's research while affiliated with Oakland University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Full-text available
We adapted the emotional Stroop task developed for primates to test whether gorillas would show response slowing for images of ‘negative’ compared to images of ‘positive’ items placed within previously reinforced borders. Three zoo-housed male gorillas participated in six phases of an emotional Stroop paradigm. In Phase One, they learned to select...
Article
Full-text available
Other-regarding preferences demonstrated through prosocial behaviors are widely demonstrated in humans but difficult to explain from an evolutionary perspective. Comparative studies have attempted to elucidate the selective pressures for prosocial preferences, with some proposing complex sociality as a mechanism. Macaws, although not cooperative br...
Article
Full-text available
Although felids in general tend to be relatively asocial, domestic cats live closely with humans and other domestic species and thus, might be expected to respond to cues indicating, for example, the reputation of others. Furthermore, recent research with other less social species suggests that social learning is not unique to group-housed animals....

Citations

... Our sample size was very small, which limited the power of our statistical analyses. Studies investigating reputation formation in animals often have small sample sizes (e.g., there are between 4 and 17 individuals in [5,[8][9][10]40,53]) and it can be difficult to interpret the results because conducting a GLMM may be problematic if there are not enough data to measure the response accurately, or there may not be enough power to analyse the results adequately and thus show false positive or false negative results. To counteract this problem, we also conducted exact binomial tests to analyse the behaviour of each subject, which indeed showed that some individuals behaved in a way consistent with forming a reputation of the two partners. ...
... A strong emphasis on studying group-living species, such as primates, canids, cetaceans and corvids (e.g., [10,11,[20][21][22][23][24] has led to the neglect of other aspects of sociality as predictors of social cognition, such as pair bonds and cooperative breeding [18]. Although cooperative breeding has emerged as a possible predictor of social cognitive abilities in primates [25,26], and birds [27][28][29], other groups present important opportunities for study. For example, within rodents, there exists a wide range of social structures (e.g., [30,31], including the monogamous pair bonds of African crested porcupines-a large species of rodent, ranging from 10-15 kg, that inhabits Central and North Africa, as well as Central Italy [32,33]. ...