Jere A. Boudell's research while affiliated with Clayton State University and other places

Publications (32)

Article
Full-text available
Premise: One of the challenges in field biology is locating previously sampled plots. The Plot Locator app was developed to assist field biologists with plot identification and location, with or without GPS or online connectivity. Methods and results: The Plot Locator Android app helps users locate field plots by creating a searchable database t...
Chapter
Ecosystem functions are the many processes conducted by ecosystems. The term, "ecosystem function," can also refer to the individual components involved in various ecosystem processes such as soil, water, and organisms. Ecosystem functions vary throughout the landscape and through time. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Natur...
Chapter
Ecosystem services are the many processes conducted by ecosystems, which provide resources of benefit to humans and other organisms. Typically the inherent value of these services only becomes apparent after the services are interrupted and the disruption impacts the quality of human life. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Na...
Chapter
A metacommunity is defined as a network of communities populated by poten- tially interacting species that are linked across landscapes through dispersal. Metacommunity theory unifies landscape or regional processes, namely dispersal, with local processes such as niche dynamics. This unification of ecological theories can provide wetland and ripari...
Chapter
Landscapes are heterogeneous areas consisting of interacting biotic and abiotic components. Landscape ecology emphasizes landscape pattern, connectivity within the landscape, and the interaction between landscape pattern and ecolog- ical process. The interaction of people with the landscape is also an integral component of landscape ecology due to...
Chapter
Gap and patch dynamics refer to functional differences in a landscape matrix, which are initiated by disturbances. Disturbances remove biomass and change the environment. This creates heterogeneity in the environment and provides opportunities for organisms to disperse into newly created spaces and establish. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V.,...
Chapter
Corridors are contiguous areas of land, which connect habitat patches together. These features can also exist as routes within bodies of water or in the case of rivers; the river itself is the corridor. Corridors facilitate movement between patches, and can be used by land managers to alleviate the effects of fragmenta- tion by providing a dispersa...
Chapter
A patch is an area that is distinguishable within an otherwise fairly homogeneous distribution of one or more landscape elements. A patch might also refer to an area of resources that becomes available after a tree has fallen or as an ecosystem remnant created via landscape fragmentation. Patchy ecosystems become elements of the overall landscape m...
Chapter
Disturbance is a natural process that disrupts the environment and can impact species through injury, death, or migration. A disturbance also creates landscape heterogeneity if landscape elements (e.g., logs and soil) are modified or removed. Disturbance can remove competitors and release resources, allowing new species and individuals to occupy th...
Article
Full-text available
While disturbances such as fire, cutting, and grazing can be an important part of the conservation of natural lands, some adjustments to management designed to mimic natural disturbance may be necessary with ongoing and projected climate change. Stressed vegetation that is incapable of regeneration will be difficult to maintain if adults are experi...
Chapter
A metacommunity is defined as a network of communities populated by potentially interacting species that are linked across landscapes through dispersal (Hanski and Gilpin 1991; Wilson 1992; Holyoak et al. 2005). Metacommunity theory unifies landscape or regional processes, namely dispersal, with local processes such as niche dynamics. This unificat...
Chapter
Corridors are contiguous areas of land, which connect habitat patches together. These features can also exist as routes within bodies of water or in the case of rivers; the river itself is the corridor. Corridors facilitate movement between patches, and can be used by land managers to alleviate the effects of fragmentation by providing a dispersal...
Chapter
Ecosystem services are the many processes conducted by ecosystems, which provide resources of benefit to humans and other organisms. Typically the inherent value of these services only becomes apparent after the services are interrupted and the disruption impacts the quality of human life.
Chapter
Disturbance is a natural process that disrupts the environment and can impact species through injury, death, or migration. A disturbance also creates landscape heterogeneity if landscape elements (e.g., logs and soil) are modified or removed. Disturbance can remove competitors and release resources, allowing new species and individuals to occupy th...
Chapter
Ecosystem functions are the many processes conducted by ecosystems. The term, “ecosystem function,” can also refer to the individual components involved in various ecosystem processes such as soil, water, and organisms. Ecosystem functions vary throughout the landscape and through time.
Chapter
A metacommunity is defined as a network of communities populated by potentially interacting species that are linked across landscapes through dispersal. Metacommunity theory unifies landscape or regional processes, namely dispersal, with local processes such as niche dynamics. This unification of ecological theories can provide wetland and riparian...
Chapter
Landscapes are heterogeneous areas consisting of interacting biotic and abiotic components. Landscape ecology emphasizes landscape pattern, connectivity within the landscape, and the interaction between landscape pattern and ecological process. The interaction of people with the landscape is also an integral component of landscape ecology due to th...
Article
Atmospheric and agricultural inputs of nitrogen have increased significantly. Because riparian zones act as buffers for nutrient transfer and treated municipal effluent and untreated agricultural run-off are released into streams, and because desert riparian ecosystems contain a wide range of functional groups with respect to water relations, we as...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods As attention is increasingly focused on the deleterious effects of urbanization on stream health, restoration of degraded streams has increased. Ecologists recognize the integral role soil plays in the successful revegetation of degraded riparian ecosystems. Unfortunately, restoration practices typically focus on strea...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Microstegium vimineum (MIVI) is a shade-tolerant exotic C-4 grass found in Eastern North America that successfully establishes in restored riparian ecosystems due to altered habitat and nutrient content. As a dominant species, MIVI can lower diversity of plant communities. Previous research has found that in the absenc...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods In the southwestern United States, as streams have been dewatered due to groundwater pumping or diversion for agricultural or municipal purposes, treated wastewater effluent is increasingly being discharged into stream channels to support riparian ecosystems. Changing the amount of nitrate can alter community dynamics,...
Article
Full-text available
Floods create landscape heterogeneity through erosion and deposition of sediment, but more information is needed on how these physical processes influence plant communities. We conducted two glasshouse experiments to determine how assemblages of riparian seeds with different traits respond to burial by sediment, and to determine whether species div...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Flood disturbance in arid region rivers can be extreme, changing the abiotic and biotic conditions within riparian ecosystems. Intense flood pulsing reworks the floodplain and channel sediments resulting in colonization site renewal. Resource pulsing occurs concomitantly with flood pulsing causing a temporary increase...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The condition of Georgia Piedmont streams is receiving great interest as the effects of anthropogenic influences on them are beginning to be understood. As a site of rapid urbanization, the majority of streams in Clayton County, Georgia have poor water quality, experience heavy sedimentation, and pose a risk to human he...
Article
Full-text available
The Agua Fria River in Arizona’s Sonoran Desert was impounded and diverted more than 70 years ago. Immediately below New Waddell dam there are semi-permanent pools, but water has been released into the channel only during rare wet years. To determine whether a propagule bank exists below the dam, and whether it could contribute to the revegetation...
Article
Questions: 1. Does flood pulsing drive metacommunity dynamics and provide insurance against catastrophic flooding in desert southwestern riparian ecosystems? 2. Do upland and wetland species in the floodplain differ in their dynamics? Location: Southwestern USA. Methods: We sampled vegetation and propagule banks in four communities along a floodpla...
Article
Summary 1. Dryland riparian zones have steep spatial gradients of soil moisture and flood disturbance, and the component hydrogeomorphic surfaces support hydric to xeric plant species. These systems undergo extremes of flood and drought, a dynamic that may select for persistent soil seed banks. We asked if reliance on this strategy differed among p...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between soil surface cryptogamic crusts and seed banks was investigated in the shrub-steppe in the Lower Columbia Basin. Seventy-four percent of the seeds in a disturbed bunchgrass community were found in crevices bordering cryptogamic crust polygons. In a sagebrush/bunchgrass community, 89% of the seeds were found in crevices. In...

Citations

... Esta aplicación, por ejemplo, podría ser útil en espeleología. Boudell & Middleton (2019) desarrollaron el PlotLocator, una aplicación que permite a los investigadores de campo ubicar sus parcelas de estudio en lugares de cobertura arbórea elevada, que interfiere con las señales GPS. ...
... Ecosystem Services (ES) are goods and services offered by natural habitats that benefit human beings (Valdez and Luna, 2012). ES assessments are also crucial for economic development and for the social well-being (Constanza et al., 1997;Boudell, 2018;Lipton et al., 2018). Among ES classification (Fisher et al., 2009), provisioning ES satisfies what a consumer needs, and it has been studied extensively with the objective of enhancing local food supplies (Collins et al., 2010). ...
... The goal is not only to learn how the target resource responds to management, but how that response changes with environmental variation which may be largely unpredictable. Appropriate management actions need to be taken at appropriate times: learning what not to do may be as important as learning what to do (Middleton et al. 2017). ...
... Prevalent wind contribute to variation in seed dispersal because most desert taxa are anemochorous (Ozinga et al. 2004;Tackenberg and Stöcklin 2008). Second, microtopographic conditions, such as micro-elevation and micro-slope, not only determine seed yields indirectly through driving the distribution of the aboveground vegetation (Gomaa 2014), but also cause soil microtopographic and photothermal differences which might have further impact on seed input and germination (Boudell et al. 2002;Qian et al. 2016). However, the relative effects of these environmental factors on the species richness and size of desert soil seed banks is unknown, hampering our ability to comprehensively assess the dynamics of desert soil seed banks. ...
... Vegetation strips near headwaters are narrow as compared to those higher order streams of the main river with gentle flow rivers (González del Tánago and Garcá de Jalón, 2006). This dependence of riparian vegetation on stream order justifies its deep linkage to the climate and hydrology at regional scale (Stromberg et al., 2007;Orellana et al., 2012;Boudell et al., 2015). The type and distribution of riparian vegetation vary with the conservation status, geomorphologic heterogeneity and flow regimes of the river. ...
... could mediate the response of species gain to N enrichment ( Figure S8). These changes included a decrease in soil pH and increases in soil inorganic N concentrations that can inhibit seed germination (Boudell & Stromberg, 2015;Roem et al., 2002). Second, seed sources were limited, mainly due to reduced production of seeds by plants (Basto et al., 2015), increased microbial degradation of seeds with the decreasing soil C:N ratio (Davis, 2007) and aggravated toxicity of soil metal ions to seeds (Salemaa & Uotila, 2001). ...
... Med-rivers hydrological regimes being naturally exposed to extreme events, range from no or low flows to flash floods [99,100]. Temporary reduction in water availability is the main driving force behind adaptations to Mediterranean riparian vegetation to such conditions [101]. Therefore, although riparian vegetation may be affected by extreme streamflow disturbances (at plant functional diversity level), the adaptations of local riparian flora in Mediterranean rivers made these effects smaller [98]. ...
... Such temporal stasis implicitly assumes that there is a fixed per unit time probability of individual birth, death, and movement due to environmental conditions (e.g., Chave, 2004). Another common scenario is that habitat patches are temporary ecosystems that come and go through time, such as tidal pools (Kolasa and Romanuk, 2005), temporary seasonal wetlands (Boudell and Stromberg, 2008), temporary streams (Resh et al., 1988), water-filled tree holes (Ellis et al., 2006), and water-filled pitcher plant leaves (Kneitel and Miller, 2002). Patch formation and destruction might occur stochastically, through external environmental drivers (e.g., seasonal weather, tidal cycles), or through an internal patch process (e.g., succession, aging of individual pitcher plant leaves or tree branches that can hold water). ...
... Brassica sp. also produces copious numbers of minute light spherical seeds in small pods. This may explain their supremacy in the number of seeds in the soil seed bank over other species and confirms that seed dispersal, germination/dormancy, and size properties of species have great impacts on the spatial distribution of soil seed bank (Thompson et al., 1998;Abe et al., 2008;Pazos & Bertiller, 2008;Stromberg et al., 2008). Decocq et al., (2004) also attributed the dominance of species in soil seed banks to similar biotic and dispersal reasons. ...
... The majority of observational work supports a positive relationship between environmental heterogeneity (e.g., temperature, soil moisture, and nutrient availability) and plant species diversity across a range of natural ecosystems (e.g., grassland, forest, and wetland; Lundholm 2009, Bergholz et al. 2017, with a minority of exceptions that have reported negative and unimodal relationships or no relationship (Loneragan and Moral 1984, Freestone and Harrison 2006, Dufour et al. 2006). While, as described above, some experiments also have demonstrated a positive relationship between environmental heterogeneity and plant species diversity, others have found no effect or a negative effect of increased heterogeneity on diversity ( Fig. 1c; e.g., Stevens and Carson 2002, Stromberg et al. 2011. Although soil heterogeneity simply may not be an important factor driving plant diversity patterns in some experiments, alternatively, the observed variability among experiments could reflect variability in experimental design with respect to the sources of heterogeneity examined and how the treatments were implemented. ...