Jerald Greenberg's research while affiliated with The Ohio State University and other places

Publications (15)

Article
We systematically analyze the role of social comparison processes in organizations. Specifically, we describe how social comparison processes have been used to explain six key areas of organizational inquiry: (1) organizational justice, (2) performance appraisal, (3) virtual work environments, (4) affective behavior in the workplace, (5) stress, an...
Article
Full-text available
Idiosyncratic employment arrangements (i-deals) stand to benefit the individual employee as well as his or her employer. However, unless certain conditions apply, coworkers may respond negatively to these arrangements. We distinguish functional i-deals from their dysfunctional counterparts and highlight evidence of i-deals in previous organizationa...
Article
Individual predispositions toward time urgency were assessed among 118 emergency room nurses and 145 small-town librarians. Following from research on person–job fit, according to which people perform better when the demands of the situation match their individual characteristics than when these are mismatched, it was hypothesized that nurses (who...
Article
Self-reports of insomnia were collected among 467 nurses working at 4 hospitals. At 2 of these hospitals, a change in pay policy resulted in reduced pay for all nurses, whereas nurses' pay was unchanged at the other 2 hospitals. Nursing supervisors at 1 hospital in each group received training in promoting interactional justice, whereas no training...
Article
In response to demands and opportunities of the labor market, contemporary employers and employees voluntarily are entering into highly customized agreements regarding nonstandard employment terms. We refer to such idiosyncratic deals as "i-deals," acknowledging that these arrangements are intended to benefit all parties. Examples of i-deals includ...
Article
The term procedural justice refers to the perceived fairness of the procedures used to allocate resources. This concept was imported to the organizational sciences from the field of socio‐legal studies, where it was used to explain disputants’ reactions to the procedures used to determine the resolution of conflicts. The conceptual extrapolation wa...
Article
Fairness perceptions and sales performance measures were collected from salespersons working originally under a salary-only pay system and subsequently under a salary-plus-commission pay system (i.e., a pay-for-performance plan). Perceptions of organizational fairness were enhanced by the use of a formal pay-for-performance system, although percept...
Article
Previous research on encounters between parties of differing status tend to examine the influence of the higher status party (e.g., managers) on the lower status party (e.g., their direct reports), rather than the other way around. We suggest that it is important to examine the reactions of both higher and lower status parties (e.g., their desire f...
Article
The financial crisis of 2008, which started with an initially well-defined epicenter focused on mortgage backed securities (MBS), has been cascading into a global economic recession, whose increasing severity and uncertain duration has led and is continuing to lead to massive losses and damage for billions of people. Heavy central bank intervention...
Article
Two studies using different methods examined the effects of people's status in a social encounter, the favorability of the outcome of the encounter, and the procedural fairness of the other party during the encounter on people's desire for future interaction with the other party. Outcome favorability and procedural fairness interacted to influence...
Article
A central premise of the procedural justice literature—based on studies conducted mainly in the United States—is that people react unfavorably when they have little voice in a decision-making process. The studies reported here evaluated whether the magnitude of voice effects varies across cultures. As predicted, Studies 1–3 showed that the tendency...
Article
I argue that organizational researchers and theorists should address seven important issues inspired by Cropanzano et al.'s (2001) “what, why, and how” questions about organizational justice. Specifically, our collective justice agenda should examine the following questions: (1) What is the conceptual status of interactional justice? (2) How are re...
Article
Full-text available
Structured interviews with 996 recently fired or laid-off workers provided data for analyses of the situational and psychological antecedents of both thinking about filing a wrongful-termination claim and actually filing such a claim. Potential antecedents were drawn from relational theories of organizational justice, economic theories about claimi...

Citations

... Judgment of interpersonal justice is particularly subject to the intensity of the need to belong to a certain social category (Wenzel, 2000). is, in turn, is modi ed by status: the lower the status, the greater the meaning attached to interpersonal justice (Chen et al., 2003). e importance of interpersonal justice increases with the activation of the interdependent self, which is characterized by a sense of connectedness with others and by due a ention to one's role within in-groups (Holmvall & Bobocel, 2008). is explains why self-censorship motivated by fear and resignation diminishes if the 9(4), leader is available to subordinates and genuinely appreciates their voices (Hirak et al., 2012). ...
... Unfair job conditions are directly related to academics' commitment, and a critical outcome influenced by commitment is job satisfaction (Dorenkamp & Ruhle, 2019;Duffy et al., 2011). Perceived inequity tends to reduce commitment, job motivation, and effort (Greenberg, 2000;Greenberg & Colquitt, 2005), and academics who conclude that they are being under-rewarded may reduce their efforts relative to those they believe are treated fairly. Therefore, unfair job conditions might negatively impact FTNT academics' commitment and job satisfaction. ...
... Thus, they are likely to experience hubristic pride. On the other hand, the successful negotiation of i-deals implies that focal employees can enjoy more competitive and limited organizational resources than others, which endows i-deals with many hidden meanings (Greenberg et al., 2004). Specifically, i-deals recipients may have higher organizational status, more trust, and more attention from leaders (Rousseau et al., 2006;Ng, 2017). ...
... These unprecedented challenges have forced managers to rethink current management strategies and seek out solutions to meet the changing and unpredictable needs of key employees (Obenauer, 2021). I-deals, the voluntary and non-standardized employment agreements that are negotiated by individual employees with their employers (Rousseau et al., 2006), can flexibly meet the various needs of employees. For example, i-deals recipients have access to flexible working time or locations, training and promotion opportunities, and therefore have been seen as an appropriate tool to address some issues caused by the COVID-19 pandemic (Obenauer, 2021). ...
... When favourable treatment is received, individuals are likely to be cooperative and favourable in return (Tyler & Smith, 1998). Conversely, when unfavourable treatment is received, individuals are likely to retaliate via revenge (Bies & Tripp, 2001), legal action (Lind et al., 2000), stealing (Greenberg, 1997), and aggression (Folger & Skarlicki, 1998). ...
... First, to examine the effects of pay dispersion on employees' job performance, it is first necessary for employees to be aware of the actual pay dispersion. However, some organizations take measures to ensure that employee pay information remains opaque to prevent social comparisons, which means that employees in these organizations learn about pay dispersion levels of power distance (Brockner et al., 2001), whereas participants in Siegel and Hambrick's (2005) study were from America, which is a country featuring low levels of power distance (Brockner et al., 2001). People located in countries that feature high levels of power distance are characterized by a high tolerance of inequality and are more likely to accept the fact that others receive more rewards than they do even in cases when they experience feelings of unfairness or low control (Winterich & Zhang, 2014). ...
... In this regard, research on time-based personality characteristics suggests that associated behavioral consequences often hinge on relevant boundary conditions (e.g., Greenberg, 2002;Zhang et al., 2014). This observation seems particularly important when considering the role of time urgency for autocratic leadership. ...
... Employees may experience stress due to potential workplace stressors [1]. Organizational change [2], challenging interpersonal relationships at work [3], managers' perceptions of resource allocation fairness [4], bureaucracy, autonomy, tools and equipment, workload, role ambiguity, work/home integration, job security, and career advancement are a few examples of potential conditions or stressors [5]. These workplace pressures may cause negative feelings like tension, rage, anxiety, irritation, or depression to surface [6][7][8][9]. ...
... As indirect support that job autonomy may moderate the Distributive Justice × Procedural Justice interaction, previous work shows that this interaction effect is especially pronounced among organization members in lower power and status positions (Chen et al., 2003;Blader and Chen, 2012;Bianchi et al., 2015;Van Dijke et al., 2019), who may also experience lower autonomy. Yet, job autonomy and power are distinct constructs. ...
... Despite empirical evidence linking each type of justice to various employee attitudes and behaviors, little has known how these dimensions interact with others' justice experiences. As a result, they advocated for a change in focus toward a more comprehensive assessment of justice (Greenberg, 2001;Shapiro, 2001). Overall justice is a general assessment of the fairness of an entity based on one's perceptions and the perceptions of other members of the group. ...