Jeff Corntassel's research while affiliated with University of Victoria and other places

Publications (13)

Article
For Indigenous Nations on Turtle Island (Canada and the USA), the onset of COVID-19 has exacerbated food insecurity and adverse health outcomes. This situation report examines ways that Indigenous peoples on Turtle Island have met the challenges of the pandemic in their communities and their daily practices of community resurgence through social me...
Article
The modern-day reinvigoration of individual Indigenous nations around the world is connected to broader simultaneous movements of Indigenous nationhood worldwide. The origins, implications, philosophies, and diversities of Indigenous resurgences and resistances continue to be discussed in the growing body of literature on Indigenous governance. Thi...
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Full-text available
Indigenous youth today are in a precarious position. The elders who guided their grandparents and parents often suffered from direct racism and dislocation from cultural practices, land, medicine, language, knowledge and traditional lifeways. Family and community kinship networks that provided emotional, spiritual and physical support have been bru...
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Full-text available
Amidst ongoing, contemporary colonialism, this article explores Indigenous pathways to decolonization and resurgence with an emphasis on identifying everyday practices of renewal and responsibility within native communities today. How are decolonization and resurgence interrelated in struggles for Indigenous freedom? By drawing on several comparati...
Article
Due to colonization and on‐going imperial influences, Indigenous women have had to create new diplomatic spaces at the global, regional, state, and local levels to pursue simultaneous negotiations and assertions for both their individual rights as women and collective rights as members of Indigenous nations. Through a series of case studies, such a...
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Indigenous Storytelling is Connected to our Homelands and is crucial to the cultural and political resurgence of Indigenous nations. According to Maori scholar Linda Smith, “‘The talk’ about the colonial past is embedded in our political discourses, our humour, poetry, music, storytelling, and other common sense ways of passing on both a narrative...
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In his reflections on the early days of the 1994 Zapatista (EZLN) uprising that garnered global attention, Subcomandante Marcos acknowledges the real impetus for change behind this Mayan political and cultural movement that was hidden from the headlines: the women. As Vinding (1998, 12) notes, Indigenous women have been “underrepresented in Indigen...
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Official apologies and truth commissions are increasingly utilized as mechanisms to address human rights abuses. Both are intended to transform inter-group relations by marking an end point to a history of wrongdoing and providing the means for political and social relations to move beyond that history. However, state-dominated reconciliation mecha...
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More than eighty years since Chief Deskaheh petitioned the League of Nations for Haudenosaunee self-determination, it is becoming clearer that the existing rights discourse can take indigenous peoples only so far. States and global/regional forums have framed self-determination rights that deemphasize the responsibilities and relationships that ind...
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This article critically examines the effectiveness of emergent transnational Indigenous rights networks during the first United Nations (UN) Indigenous Decade (1995–2004). Keck and Sikkink's five-part model is utilized in the analysis but is found to be inadequate when gauging the overall effectiveness of Indigenous political mobilization during...
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In this article, we discuss strategies for resisting further encroachment on Indigenous existences by Settler societies and states – and as well multinational corporations and other elite organizations controlled by state powers and other elements of the imperial institutional network; and we focus on how Indigenous communities can regenerate thems...
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Debate within global forums over establishing definitional standards for indigenous peoples versus an unlimited right of indigenous self-identification has exposed something of a dilemma over standard setting in international law. Requiring strict, definitional standards excludes some indigenous groups from the very protections they need, while rei...
Article
Human Rights Quarterly 24.1 (2002) 126-151 Many heralded 1998, which marked the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as a milestone for universal legal protection of individuals. For others, this anniversary was a time for critical reappraisal of existing human rights instruments and norms. Two pressing issues for crit...

Citations

... Levkoe et al. (2021) similarly argued that addressing Indigenous food insecurity during the pandemic must be rooted in a decolonizing framework. Corntassel et al. (2020) looked at the everyday land and food activities Indigenous communities undertook to ensure food security. Levi and Robin (2020) further argued that public health measures (e.g., sheltering in place, social distancing, regular hand washing) cannot be followed by the many Indigenous families who lack access to clean water and live in overcrowded and substandard housing. ...
... Taken together, sections C(5) and C(7) offer avenues through which the legal personhood of natural actors could be pursued when advanced in accordance with Ǧvil ̓ ás and the Declaration. In turn, advancing the rights of natural actors could facilitate broader and deeper forms of Heiltsuk governing authority in coastal, marine, and water governance-areas in which Indigenous stewardship practices have been historically marginalized but are being revitalized by Heiltsuk (von der Porten et al., 2019). This shift toward Indigenous governance could be formally actualized via declaring the legal personalities of natural actors, which would mark a fundamental departure from current relationships between British Columbia and Heiltsuk waters. ...
... In Biigtigong, everyday practices of healing and environmental repossession are supporting this process as the community reclaims its territory and rebuilds its own practices of mental wellness along the pathway to mino-bimaadiziwin. At the camp, the everyday action of tie-dying a community shirt or frying bannock in the bush became a demonstration of Anishinaabe nationhood in that it fostered intergenerational belonging to community, culture, and the land [25,69,70]. ...
... Current thinking in environmental justice also seeks intersectional and transformational approaches towards repairing environmental harms (Pellow 2016). Indigenous scholarship is at the forefront of this integration of social and ecological justice concerns by focusing our attention on dismantling the systems of power degrading human-land relations rather than seeking an extension of 'rights' by those same systems (Gilio-Whitaker, 2019;Corntassel, 2012;Weaver, 1996). In contrast to 'rights' based approaches, scholars like Coulthard and Simpson (2016) offer a concept of grounded normativity which centers the need for explicitly ethical and multi-generational relationships with place in order to enact positive forms of ecological transformation. ...
... Prior research has indicated the role of women to be central to social movements (Parisi and Corntassel, 2007, Pardo, 1990, John, 2015, Harris et al., 2015, Harper et al., 2018, Veuthey and Gerber, 2012. This is attributed to the gender division of work, power, and access to natural resources that creates different responsibilities and knowledge according to gender; this in turn creates conditions under which women and men perceive market intrusion and natural resources depletion differently, thus creating mobilizations structured according to gender (Agrawal and Gibson, 2001). ...
... There is a lack of control to preserve traditions through their political position and policies from imposed cultural hegemony. 15 We argue that Maasai people are similar to indigenous groups in North America, New Zealand and Australia with respect to the value of upholding historical traditions and their struggles to maintain a particular way of life. ...
... Moreover, a declaration might develop a decolonized public trust doctrine rooted in Indigenous multi-generational and legal ethics. A more grounded approach might also engage in cultural, political, and legal resurgence to advance Indigenous nationhood and "sustainable self-determination" (Corntassel, 2008;2012), which may also challenge the very foundation of the rights of nature-its reliance on rights-based discourses. Notwithstanding what process is pursued, societal change must be paired with these declarations to advance its legitimacy as well, which could occur through engaging with Indigenous storied precedents, advocacy work, and the transformation of public and academic discourses across Canada's plural legal landscapes and diverse socio-cultural geographies. ...
... Despite the growing fanfare around reconciliation in Canada, many Indigenous scholars are skeptical about reconciliation and see it as a state project concerned about optics over substance (e.g.Alfred, 2005;Corntassel et al., 2009;Coulthard, 2014;Daigle, 2019;Manuel, 2017;McGregor, 2018a;A. Simpson, 2014;L. ...
... Rights to self-determination -including rights to prior consultation and guardianship -are important legal recognitions and protections for the security of Indigenous communities (Burgos González 2006;Holder & Corntassel 2002;Shelton 2014). When Indigenous communities exercise those rights to protect themselves against existential threats (such as extractive development projects), they often confront violence from the state which renders those rights vulnerable and undermines the democratic process that ensures their recognition and representation. ...
... Indigenous peoples predate the formation of modern nation-states; they possess specific organizations and expressions based on their own worldviews, identities and ancestral community relationships (Beier, 2009(Beier, , 2016Costa, 2009;Franke, 2009;Soguk, 2009), which differentiate them from the state-centric order and its international expressions (Beier, 2009(Beier, , 2016Corntassel, 2007;Costa, 2009). Therefore, they operate beyond the limited ontology of Western modernity that centres on the sovereignty of state borders and is supported by imagery and historical practices that transcend contemporary geographical boundaries. ...