Jeff A. Bouffard's research while affiliated with Iowa State University and other places

Publications (17)

Article
The “gender gap” in offending is largest for violent crime types, and many theoretical perspectives have attempted to account for this gap. The current study provides unique insight into these issues by using a sample of men and women in prison to examine and explain intentions to be aggressive in response to a hypothetical scenario. Results show t...
Article
Stalking is a serious crime involving a course of repeated conduct that frightens, threatens, or harasses the victim. Despite growing scholarly attention, the criminal justice system response to stalking has been understudied. Prior research suggests that stalking, like other interpersonal crimes (i.e., sexual assault, domestic violence) is underre...
Article
Self-control and psychopathy are general theories of antisociality that have considerable empirical support, are conceptually similar, and have occasionally been studied together. A recent head-to-head test of the theories and found that self-control generally outperformed psychopathy among assorted criminal outcomes among institutionalized delinqu...
Article
The increased accessibility and use of pornography in Western society highlights the emergent need to understand the relationship between its use and sexual coercion. Decades of research have demonstrated a consistent relationship between pornography use and engaging in sexually aggressive behavior, although what drives this relationship remains la...
Article
Desistance scholars have increasingly focused on what is conceived of as a lengthy process of moving away from criminality, especially the central role of the individual making a decision to do so. Control theories may be especially useful in understanding this process, given their emphasis on social influences that may restrain individuals from cr...
Article
Deterrence research finds mixed support for the effect of sanction, potentially due to differences in deterrability across individuals. We assessed differential deterrabilty within a known offender sample (n = 428), and examined consistency in deterrability across multiple offense types: drunk driving, aggravated assault and commercial robbery. Usi...
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Full-text available
The general theory of crime proposes that the components that make up self-control increase crime by “affecting the calculation of the consequences of one’s acts” (i.e., cost consideration). Despite receiving empirical attention, little is known about the validity of this aspect of the theory because a general factor of self-control has not been em...
Article
According to recent statistics, as many as one in five female college students are victims of sexual assault during their college career. To combat what has been called the “Campus Rape Crisis,” researchers have attempted to understand what variables are associated with sexually coercive behaviors in college males. Although investigators have found...
Article
Sex offender registration and notification (SORN) laws were implemented to protect communities by increasing public awareness, and these laws have expanded over time to include registration by more types of offenders. Despite widespread implementation, research provides only inconsistent support for the impact of SORN laws on incidence of sexual of...
Article
Deterrence research supports the idea that punishment curbs offending; however, results for the specific deterrent effects of drunk driving are more nuanced. This research is often limited in its use of non-offender samples, its failure to examine links between past sanctions and subsequent risk perceptions, and in its use of aggregate-level data,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: In recent years, jurisdictions have recognized the strain placed on limited existing resources by criminal offenders with mental illness who frequently cycle through local jail facilities. In response, many locales have developed and implemented specialized programs to more effectively and efficiently manage these offenders, particular...
Article
Research has generally supported the effectiveness of restorative justice (RJ) programs on a number of outcomes; however, little research has examined the effectiveness of variations in the intervention. This study examined several variations of an RJ program for juvenile offenders, including direct mediation, indirect forms of victim/offender medi...
Article
Deterrence represents the central theoretical core of the American criminal justice system, yet relatively little attention has been paid to how emotions like fear and anger may relate to deterrence. Psychological research has debated whether negative emotions each have similar impacts on decision making (valence approaches) or if distinct emotions...
Article
Background Hirschi recently revised the measurement of self-control to include the number and salience of costs an individual considers in an offending situation. Evidence is mixed on its predictive utility relative to other self-control measures but suffers from different studies operationalising the measure in different ways and mostly examining...
Article
A growing body of research suggests that perception of various benefits can mediate the role of emotions on offending, however similar research has yet to find much support for the impact of emotional state on cost perceptions. Other research suggests that the influence of cost perceptions may be moderated by emotional state – that is, only relevan...
Article
Much of the criminological literature testing rational choice theory has utilized hypothetical scenarios presented to university students. Although this research generally supports rational choice theory, a common criticism is that conclusions from these studies may not generalize to samples of actual offenders. This study proceeds to examine this...
Article
Gottfredson and Hirschi’s general theory of crime has generated an impressive array of theoretical and empirical research. One particular area of research has concerned the definition and operationalization of self‐control. Recently, Hirschi has redefined self‐control as the tendency to consider the full range of potential costs of a particular act...

Citations

... On the basis of our findings, practitioners in law enforcement, social services, mental health, and related domains should note the diversity of emotional outcomes experienced by cyberstalking victims. Despite evidence that stalking and cyberstalking are relatively unlikely to receive police or prosecutorial attention (Bouffard et al., 2021;Brady & Nobles, 2017;, the potential barriers to victim acknowledgment and assistance should nonetheless be critically examined. These victims could benefit from complementary and overlapping standards of care involving individual and group counseling as well as medication to address alternative impacts from depression and anxiety. ...
... Sexual violence (SV) among young adults and college students is a worldwide public health problem (Kaya et al., 2020). Although men are more sexually aggressive than women, recent studies have shown that women also resort to aggressive means to initiate sexual intercourse with an unwilling male partner, namely sexual coercion (Bouffard et al., 2016;Marshall et al., 2021;Miller et al., 2017). ...
... This, coupled with the practical reason that members of the street population sometimes feel that they must offend to survive, means that it does not make sense to think about crime as a singular act that a person can be deterred from undertaking in some general sense (Nagin, 2013) or about which they form some overall moral judgment. Different kinds of criminal behavior may be differentially shaped by police activity, people's reactions to that behavior, and their moral judgments about it (Bouffard et al. 2018). For example, given that street population 'nuisance' behavior is continuously the target of focused police attention, individuals experiencing homelessness are likely to have a relatively good sense of their chances of being caught if they engage in such behavior, a perspective they may lack for other types of offending. ...
... In addition to assessing the dimensional properties of the self-control construct developed by Grasmick and colleagues, research has also proposed alternative measures for this concept. One such proposal was made by Hirschi (2004) in which he called on researchers to move away from viewing self-control as a personality trait or a predisposition for crime, and instead, conceptualizing self-control as a set of inhibitions (or enduring tendencies) that an individual carry with them wherever they go (see also, Higgins, Wolfe, & Marcum, 2008;Piquero & Bouffard, 2007;Vaughan, Ward, Bouffard, & Piquero, 2018;Wikström & Treiber, 2007). Important for present purposes, Gottfredson and Hirschi's theory has been employed to examine the perpetration of harassment, bullying, and cyberstalking. ...
... Increasing numbers of men are being found guilty of violence against women where pornography consumption was implicated. Literature linking pornography use to sexual offending, sexual aggression and abuse is now strong [62,80,81]. ...
... This is grounded on the premise of reducing recidivism and assisting police in investigations and prosecution of new offences (Simmons, 2019). The majority of research into the effectiveness of sex offender registries has been conducted outside of Australia and New Zealand, with results providing limited empirical evidence in favour of registration laws decreasing sexual recidivism (Bouffard & Askew, 2019;Letourneau, Levenson, Bandyopadhyay, Sinha, et al., 2010;Tewksbury et al., 2012;see Terry, 2015, for further review). Within Australia, there is little research that suggests that the implementation of registration laws reduces recidivism. ...
... Through the existence of publicly advertised laws and by witnessing the punishment of others, deterrence can generally prevent would-be offenders from offending (Stafford & Warr 1993). Conversely, under the banner of specific deterrence, policies have been designed to stop perpetrators from reoffending due to the threat of experiencing additional criminal sanctions (Bouffard et al. 2017). Taken together, these and many other important branches of deterrence research have tested and shaped Beccaria's (1764) treatise into a nuanced theory for explaining crime (a consequence of rational calculations in which the perceived reward exceeds the likely perceived consequence) and a platform to design crime prevention and counterterrorism strategies. ...
... Youth violence, particularly knife crime Interventions based on restorative justice principles have been shown to reduce the risk of recidivism for young people when compared to court proceedings (Bouffard et al, 2017). An example of such programmes is the one run by 'Upskill U' in Haringey, seeking to offer restorative outcomes to young people aged 18-25 who might not be eligible for a 'low-level' disposal. ...
... avoidance, aggression, violence, temporary escape from problems) (Chubaty, 2001;Jordaan and Hesselink, 2022;Pretorius et al., 2022) among incarcerated offenders tend to negatively impact the adjustment to incarceration by putting offenders at an increased risk of several consequences (e.g. depression, anxiety, suicide, panic, withdrawal, grief, trauma, loss of control, hopelessness, suicide ideation, hostility, rage, misconduct, violence) (Asberg and Renk, 2012;Bouffard, 2015;Newhard, 2014;Picken, 2012;Wright et al., 2017). These negative consequences (e.g. ...
... Of the 778 who participated, 751 viable surveys were used for analysis. More detailed information concerning the survey administration procedures for students and inmates is available elsewhere (Bouffard, Craig, & Piquero, 2015;Bouffard & Exum, 2013;Bouffard & Petkovsek, 2014;Piquero, Bouffard, Piquero, & Craig, 2016;Vaughan et al., 2016). ...