Jean P. Gibert's research while affiliated with Duke University and other places

Publications (19)

Preprint
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Climate change is affecting how energy and matter flow within ecosystems, altering global carbon and nutrient cycles. Microorganisms play a fundamental role in carbon and nutrient cycling and are thus an integral link between ecosystems and climate. Here, we highlight a major black box hindering our ability to anticipate ecosystem climate responses...
Preprint
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As biomass dynamics capture information on population dynamics and ecosystem-level processes (e.g., changes in production over time), understanding how rising temperatures associated with global climate change influence biomass dynamics is a pressing issue in ecology. The total biomass of a species depends on its density and its average mass. Disen...
Article
1. Body size is a fundamental trait linked to many ecological processes—from individuals to ecosystems. Although the effects of body size on metabolism are well‐known, the potential reciprocal effects of body size and density are less clear. Specifically, 1) whether changes in body size or density more strongly influence the other and 2) whether co...
Article
1. Understanding how food webs will respond to globally rising temperatures is a pressing issue. Temperature effects on food webs are likely underpinned by differences in the thermal sensitivity of consumers and resources, or thermal asymmetries. We identify three sources of asymmetry in the rising portion of thermal performance curves: inter‐therm...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature strongly influences microbial community structure and function, in turn contributing to global carbon cycling that can fuel further warming. Recent studies suggest that biotic interactions among microbes may play an important role in determining the temperature responses of these communities. However, how predation regulates these micro...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic specialization holds information about the assembly, evolution, and stability of biological communities. Partner availabilities can play an important role in enabling species interactions, where uneven partner availabilities can bias estimates of biotic specialization when using phylogenetic diversity indices. It is therefore important to ac...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic diversity and temperature increases associated with global climate change are known to independently influence population growth and extinction risk. Whether increasing temperature may influence the effect of genetic diversity on population growth, however, is not known. We address this issue in the model protist system Tetrahymena thermoph...
Article
Significance Microbes regulate nutrient flux and carbon storage within ecosystems, making them essential to the global carbon cycle and ecosystem responses to climate change. Understanding how climate change will alter microbial communities and how this will feed back to influence the pace of climate change requires linking processes across levels...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate warming will likely disrupt the flow of matter and energy within ecosystems, threatening the global carbon balance. Microorganisms are fundamental components of carbon cycling and are thus integral to ecosystem climate responses. However, ecosystem responses to warming are uncertain due to the functional and trophic complexity of microbial...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic increases in temperature and nutrient loads will likely impact food web structure and stability. Though their independent effects have been well studied, their joint effects-particularly on coupled ecological and phenotypic dynamics-remain poorly understood. Here we experimentally manipulated temperature and nutrient levels in microbi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biotic specialization holds information about the assembly, evolution and stability of biological communities. Phylogenetic diversity metrics have been used to quantify biotic specialization, but their current implementations do not adequately account for the availability of the interacting partners. Also, the overdispersed pattern of phylogenetic...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Body size is a fundamental trait linked to many ecological processes-from individuals to ecosystems. Although the effects of body size on metabolism are well-known, how body size influences, and is influenced by, population growth and density is less clear. Specifically, 1) whether body size, or population dynamics, more strongly influences the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Genetic diversity and temperature increases associated with global climate change, are known to independently influence population growth and extinction risk. Whether increasing temperature may influence the effect of genetic diversity on population growth, however, is not known. We address this issue in the model protist system Tetrahymena thermop...
Article
Full-text available
1. Climate change is altering ecological and evolutionary processes across biological scales. These simultaneous effects of climate change pose a major challenge for predicting the future state of populations, communities, and ecosystems. This challenge is further exacerbated by the current lack of integration of research focused on these different...
Preprint
Full-text available
Temperature strongly influences microbial community structure and function, which in turn contributes to the global carbon cycle that can fuel further warming. Recent studies suggest that biotic interactions amongst microbes may play an important role in determining the temperature responses of these communities. However, how microbial predation re...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting food web structure in future climates is a pressing goal of ecology. These predictions may be impossible without a solid understanding of the factors that structure current food webs. The most fundamental aspect of food web structure—the relationship between the number of links and species—is still poorly understood. Some species interac...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microbial communities regulate ecosystem responses to climate change. But predicting these responses is challenging due to complex interactions among processes at multiple ecological scales. Organismal traits that determine individual performance and ecological interactions are essential for scaling up predictions of environmental responses from in...
Article
Mass mortality events (MMEs) are rapidly occurring, substantial population losses that transpire within a short time interval relative to the generation time of the affected organism. Previous work has established that MMEs appear to be increasing in frequency and magnitude; however, currently, there is little understanding of the consequences of M...

Citations

... Until recently, symbiont flexibility was believed largely to be the exception in lichens, in part due to the intractability of the symbiotic system to experimentation in highly controlled laboratory conditions [15][16][17]. In fact, a growing body of evidence challenges this assumption as rapid advances in molecular data generation and analysis have led to increasing recognition that lichen symbioses are far more complex, diverse, and flexible than has long been assumed [18][19][20][21][22][23]. ...
... is tightly linked to ontogenetic change in body size (cells grow then divide when a critical size is attained). However, T. pyriformis also reproduces extremely fast (~4 generations per day, ) and exhibits wide standing phenotypic variation in body size (Wieczynski et al. 2021), so rapid evolutionary change is also possible. Therefore, to distinguish the impacts of plasticity and evolution on changes in body size, we fit alternative mathematical models (Plasticity Model, Eco-Evolutionary Model, and Plasticity + Eco-Evo Model) to our experimental time series and use model selection to infer which one best explains our data. ...
... This study sheds light on the ecological and evolutionary constraints that regulate population growth and provides new insights about how organisms cope with the negative effects of density-dependence. Our results also emphasize the need to further study and understand the ecological consequences of rapid plastic phenotypic change (Yamamichi, Yoshida & Sasaki 2011;Tariel, Plénet & Luquet 2020), as plasticity, particularly in body size, may play a crucial role in determining the fate of networks of species interactions in a warming world (Barbour & Gibert 2021;Jacob & Legrand 2021). , and that −2 = 100 and −7 = 100 − . ...
... Here, we address this issue in a model microbial system, the globally distributed protist Tetrahymena thermophila. These organisms play an important role in the global carbon cycle that ultimately determines the pace of climate change (i.e., the microbial loop; Gao et al., 2019;Karhu et al., 2014;Rocca et al., 2021) and are easy to grow in temperature-controlled laboratory conditions (Fjerdingstad et al., 2007) making them an ideal system to understand how temperature may influence ecological processes (Petchey et al., 1999;Wieczynski et al., 2021). ...
... Animal mass mortality events-sudden die-offs that affect many demographic classes within populations-have increased in frequency and magnitude since the mid-20 th century (Fey et al. 2015) concomitant with global change (Garrabou et al. 2019). These extreme demographic events impact ecosystem function (McDowell et al. 2017), imperil population persistence (Mangel and Tier 1994;Anderson et al. 2017), restructure ecological communities Fey et al. 2019), and reduce global food supply (Soon and Ransangan 2019). Documented animal mortality events have disproportionately affected freshwater fishes (Fey et al. 2015), which are already experiencing global declines (He et al. 2010). ...