Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt's research while affiliated with University of Lorraine and other places

Publications (33)

Article
Key message We present a methodological framework that both scientists and supply chain actors can mobilise to organise information at different scales of observation, and further make informed decisions regarding the supply and extraction of bio-molecules from forest biomass. We demonstrate its usefulness for extracting bio-molecules contained in...
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The search for generalizations in the face of complex species–environment interactions is particularly important for minimizing the cost of managing populations of species. We tested whether we could generalize, at various nested scales, the species‐level demography of the widely invasive plant species Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae) and whether th...
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Forest ecosystems are typical examples of socio-ecological systems. However, in terms of modeling, the social aspect has been given far less attention than the ecological aspect. In this study, we modeled the impact of economic and social factors on the occurrence of harvesting. This harvest model was then integrated into an individual-based model...
Data
Supplementary Material related to Pichancourt et al. 2018. A carbon accounting tool for complex and uncertain greenhouse gas emission life cycles. Environmental Modelling & Software 107: 158-174.
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Software applications for life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have become popular over the last decade. Their objective is to provide insight into how GHG emissions could be reduced in the sectors defined by the UNFCCC. However, boundaries between these sectors are not closed and current tools are not designed to represent this...
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Determining the best management actions is challenging when critical information is missing. However, urgency and limited resources require that decisions must be made despite this uncertainty. The best practice method for managing uncertain systems is adaptive management, or learning by doing. Adaptive management problems can be solved optimally u...
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Changed fire regimes have led to declines of fire-regime- adapted species and loss of biodiversity globally. Fire affects population processes of growth, reproduction, and dispersal in different ways, but there is little guidance about the best fire regime(s) to maintain species population processes in fire-prone ecosystems. We use a process-based...
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Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity and its impacts can act synergistically to heighten the severity of other threats. Most research on projecting species range shifts under climate change has not been translated to informing priority management strategies on the ground. We develop a prioritization framework to assess strategies...
Article
Long-lived plant species are highly valued environmentally, economically, and socially, but can also cause substantial harm as invaders. Realistic demographic predictions can guide management decisions, and are particularly valuable for long-lived species where population response times can be long. Long-lived species are also challenging, given po...
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Das Wetter ist ein allgemeiner stochastischer Einflussfaktor für die Lebensgeschichte von Unkräutern. Im Gegensatz dazu ist anthropogene Störung (z.B. Landnutzung) ein wichtiger determinierender Einfluss auf die Demographie von Unkräutern. Das Ziel unserer Studie war es, die relativen Beiträge von Landnutzung und Wetter zur Demographie von Lantana...
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Threats to migratory animals can occur at multiple periods of the annual cycle that are separated by thousands of kilometers and span international borders. Populations of the iconic monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America have declined over the last 21 years. Three hypotheses have been posed to explain the decline: habitat lo...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Conserving migratory animals requires understanding population dynamics that link how individuals move, survive and reproduce throughout the annual cycle. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America are famous for their long-distance migration and unique life-history but they face multiple threats a...
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Regrowing forests on cleared land is a key strategy to achieve both biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation globally. Maximizing these co-benefits, however, remains theoretically and technically challenging because of the complex relationship between carbon sequestration and biodiversity in forests, the strong influence of climate v...
Data
Details of the sites surveyed. * The closest climate station to the field site (http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/data/). (XLS)
Data
The empirical relationship between canopy volume (V) and plant growth rate (G) in different climate regions. Where possible, points represent growth rate values per site and year for a given climate region. (TIF)
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Chi-square test for the stable population structure. The test shows the difference between the observed population vector and the predicted stable population vector (i.e., the right eigenvector of the transition matrix). These vectors give the relative proportion of individuals at the different life-stages (SB, Juv, Ad1.5, Ad5, …, Ad 300). Because...
Data
Correlation between site-level annual rainfall and germination rate (Germ). The estimated germination rates confirmed previous experimental results. (TIF)
Data
The empirical relationship between canopy volume (V) and plant survival rate (S) in different climate regions. Where possible, points represent survival rate values per site and year for a given climate region. (TIF)
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity has long been suspected to allow invasive species to expand their geographic range across large-scale environmental gradients. We tested this possibility in Australia using a continental scale survey of the invasive tree Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae) in twenty-three sites distributed across four climate regions and three hab...
Article
1. Designing practical rules for controlling invasive species is a challenging task for managers, particularly when species are long-lived, have complex life cycles and high dispersal capacities. Previous findings derived from plant matrix population analyses suggest that effective control of long-lived invaders may be achieved by focusing on killi...
Article
1. A primary goal of evolutionary ecology is to understand factors selecting for the diversity of life histories. Life-history components, such as time-to-reproduction, adult survivorship and fecundity, might differ among species because of variation in direct and indirect benefits of these life histories in different environments or might have low...
Article
Over the last decades, agricultural intensification has caused a dramatic reduction of grassy habitats. This habitat loss has had a strong negative effect on many meadow-living insect populations, including butterflies. As a part of the cross-compliance measures of the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union, subsidies for creation and mai...
Data
Over the last decades, agricultural intensification has caused a dramatic reduction of grassy habitats. This habitat loss has had a strong negative effect on many meadow-living insect populations, including butterflies. As a part of the cross-compliance measures of the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union, subsidies for creation and mai...
Article
Full-text available
Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1182–1197 Explaining variation in population growth rates is fundamental to predicting population dynamics and population responses to environmental change. In this study, we used matrix population models, which link birth, growth and survival to population growth rate, to examine how and why population growth rates vary...
Article
To better understand the role of habitat quality and boundaries on population dynamics at the landscape scale, we develop a model combining a spatially implicit approach, a spatial population Leslie-type model and an implicit model of habitat fragmentation. An original approach of elasticity permits to identify which types of element and boundary i...
Article
To better understand the impact of habitat fragmentation on population dynamics at the landscape scale, we develop a model combining a spatially implicit landscape model, a multisite Leslie-type model and an implicit model of habitat fragmentation. The studied species (Abax parallelepipedus, Coleoptera: Carabidae) is a corridor forest insect sensit...

Citations

... Several scholars on environmental sustainability [34][35][36][37][38] and healthcare and wellness sustainability [39][40][41][42][43][44][45] suggest the need for an information framework for decision-making in funding or policy development. In general, these studies provide an evidence-informed decision-making framework. ...
... canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner) (USDA, ARS, & NPGS, 2021) and that is not conserved ex situ. It should be pointed out that microhabitat characteristics (Sedlacek et al., , 2016, small-scale variation in gene flow , plasticity in taxa demography (Pichancourt et al., 2019) of target CWR populations, as well as the interactions between target CWR and abiotic (e.g. plant-soil interaction, see Sedlacek et al., 2014) and biotic factors (e.g. ...
... These data are only available in sample plots. Some authors have used a hybrid inferential framework in order to obtain large-area projections from a sample of plots (Melo et al., 2017;Fortin et al., 2019Fortin et al., , 2021, but these projections are not spatially explicit and consequently, they are of limited use in the contexts of forest management planning or carbon accounting. ...
... MATHILDE is implemented on the CAPSIS platform [45], which contains a carbon accounting tool (CAT, [46]). CAT follows the IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories [47]. ...
... It is critical for the success of AM projects to anticipate the future (the requirement of the NSW policy to consider multiple climate scenarios) and to learn from the past, for example, when one decides what species and where to relocate (see, for example, Canessa et al. 2016). Both active (anticipating future) and passive (learning from the past) adaptive management styles have their advantages and challenges (see Chadès et al. 2017;Berger-Tal et al. 2020). Nevertheless, the combination of both styles increases the amount of factors to consider in AM-related decision-making, which, in its turn, can produce the most balanced outcomes. ...
... These changes have, in turn, benefited noisy miners by providing more open habitats in which the noisy miners more easily harass and exclude other birds (Maron et al., 2016;Mortelliti et al., 2016;Thomson et al., 2015). Noisy miners particularly impact small woodland bird species, which are an important subset of broader woodland bird communities, and which also collectively form an assemblage that likely meet the criteria for listing as a Threatened Ecological Community under Australian law (Fraser et al., 2017). The loss of smaller-bodied species diminishes the ecological functions of woodland areas, which become more taxonomically and ecologically homogenous (Howes et al., 2014). ...
... Whilst many attributes of a fire regime have a role in plant population processes, such as severity and season, fire interval-the number of years between fires-has been proposed as being particularly influential in fire regimes characterized by severe, or stand-replacing fires (Keeley et al. 1999;Bradstock and Kenny 2003;Enright et al. 2014). In recognition of the role of fire interval in regulating plant populations and community composition, fire management for biodiversity conservation often explicitly seeks to manage intervals within a tolerable (or acceptable; terminology varies) range to maximise the probability of persistence of all species in a vegetation community (Kenny et al. 2004;Kraaij et al. 2013;Tulloch et al. 2016). ...
... Despite a sizeable foundation of research highlighting the risks associated with the freshwater ornamental fish industry in Australia over the last 50 years (Ebner et al. 2020;Holmes et al. 2020;Harris 2013;Lintermans 2013;Corfield et al. 2008;Koehn and MacKenzie 2004;Lintermans 2004;Arthington 1986Arthington , 1989Arthington et al. 1981Arthington et al. , 1983, greater management of the industry is not recognised in biosecurity funding or action plans (e.g., Craik et al. 2017; Invasive Plants and Animals Committee 2017). Risk assessments aimed at determining an ornamental species' invasive potential languish behind other invasive terrestrial and agricultural pest and biosecurity priorities (e.g., Firn et al. 2015). Notably, while multiple models for these ornamental fish risk assessments have been developed and welcomed by ornamental researchers (e.g., Deveney 2018; Beyer and Fredberg 2010;Fredberg and McNeil 2010;Bomford and Glover 2004;Arthington et al. 1999), implementation of the suggested changes to invasive fish management regimes across the country remains to be seen. ...
... Land degradation by humans and overgrazing are the most important disturbances in our study regions (Mbaabu et al., 2019); our disturbance index quantifies these two effects. In addition, Prosopis seeds are often spread by livestock (Van Klinken & Pichancourt, 2015). Disturbances such as droughts or other extreme climate events could also affect Prosopis and our ecosystem functions, however, without temporal data we could not evaluate the effects of these events. ...
... Our study adds to the growing body of literature that highlights the importance of the demographic variability within a species in relation to environmental context (Oostermeijer et al. 1996, Menges and Quintana-Ascencio 2004, Endels et al. 2005, Shea et al. 2005, 2010, Jongejans et al. 2008, Evans et al. 2012Sm ıdov a and M€ unzbergov a 2012, Scanga and Leopold 2012, Andrieu et al. 2013, Raghu et al. 2014. We build on this body of work to develop a novel upscaling method to test whether there are context and upscaling influence ecological inferences and the ability to arrive at demographic generalizations. ...