Jay Joseph Van Bavel's research while affiliated with New York University and other places

Publications (12)

Preprint
The COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated the importance of public support for non-pharmaceutical public health interventions and the perils of rampant spread of misinformed or conspiratorial beliefs. Open-minded epistemic attitudes may be associated with adherence to public health recommendations and protect against holding false beliefs. In a large (...
Preprint
Given the spread of partisan misinformation in politically polarized environments, it is critical to develop interventions that are effective at reducing misinformation sharing in these contexts. Across three online experiments with liberals and conservatives in the U.S. and the UK, we found that crowdsourced accuracy judgments in the form of a Mis...
Article
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At the beginning of 2020, COVID-19 became a global problem. Despite all the efforts to emphasize the relevance of preventive measures, not everyone adhered to them. Thus, learning more about the characteristics determining attitudinal and behavioral responses to the pandemic is crucial to improving future interventions. In this study, we applied ma...
Preprint
While conspiracy theories may offer benefits to those who believe in them, they can also foster intergroup conflict, threaten democracy, and undercut public health. We argue that the motivations behind conspiracy theory belief are often related to social identity. Conspiracy theories are well-positioned to fulfill social identity needs such as belo...
Preprint
A large body of research has found mixed evidence that people who are quick to dismiss randomness as a potential cause for an event are also more likely to believe conspiracy theories. To clarify the relationship between randomness dismissal and conspiracist ideation, we conducted a high-powered preregistered replication of an influential study in...
Preprint
Cooperation occurs at all stages of human life and is necessary for small groups and large-scale societies alike to emerge and thrive. This chapter bridges research in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, neuroeconomics, and social psychology to help understand group cooperation. We present a value-based framework for understanding cooperation, in...
Preprint
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According to recent work, subtly nudging people to think about accuracy can reduce the sharing of COVID-19 misinformation online (Pennycook et al., 2020). The authors argue that inattention to accuracy is a key factor behind the sharing of misinformation. They further argue that “partisanship is not, apparently, the key factor distracting people fr...
Preprint
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Rising partisan animosity is linked to less support for democracy and more support for political violence. Here we provide a multi-level review of interventions designed to improve partisan animosity, which we define as negative thoughts, feelings, and behaviors towards a political outgroup. We introduce the TRI framework for the three levels of in...
Preprint
Liberals and conservatives are divided in their judgements about the accuracy of true and false news. Yet it is unclear whether this partisan divide reflects genuine differences in knowledge, or whether it can be overcome if people are motivated to be accurate. Across three experiments (n = 2,381), we motivated participants to be accurate by giving...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper develops a dual-agency model of leadership which treats collective phenomena as a co-production between leaders and followers. The model integrates work on identity leadership and engaged followership derived from the social identity tradition in social psychology. In contrast to binary models in which leaders or followers are seen to ha...
Preprint
Online misinformation poses a significant threat to global challenges such as pandemics and climate change. To understand what drives individuals to share misinformation, we conducted two pre-registered experiments with conservatives and far-right supporters in the US and Spain (N = 1,609) and a neuroimaging study with far-right supporters in Spain...

Citations

... Recent research which has also used this data and originated from the same international collaboration project (ICSMP) have used advanced machine-learning algorithms, established measurement equivalence of the moral identity internalization and symbolization sub-scales across the 67 countries included in the data set [39]. The original paper of Van Bavel et al. [31] reported a two-factor model (Internalization and Symbolization), with acceptable internal consistency. ...
... Indeed, the moralization of COVID-19 mitigation practices is thought by some to be responsible for the tensions between those who do adhere to practices and those who do not (Prosser et al., 2020). While around the world, strong national identification has been a predictor of adherence to COVID-19 guidelines (Van Bavel et al., 2021), in the United States specifically, political affiliation is one of the strongest predictors of adherence to mitigation practices (Deane et al., 2021); that is, Republicans have been less likely to follow mandates than Democrats. ...
... such as in Kahan (2012); Kahan et al. (2017); e.g., the studies Van Bavel and Pereira (2018); Pretus et al. (2021) put forth criticism of this account. Two studies reanalyzing the original work by Pennycook and Rand (2019) argue that the influence of partisanship was in fact underestimated there Gawronski, 2021). ...