Jared Verner's research while affiliated with University of Washington Seattle and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Regardless of sex ratio, a polygynous mating is expected to be adaptive for the females as well as for the male. Two possible selective bases for the evolution of polygyny are considered: 1) One male may make it advantageous to several females to mate with him by appropriating a large share of a limited number of nest sites. 2) When a large share o...
Article
Polygamy in avian mating systems has generally been interpreted as a by-product of an unbalanced sex ratio, an assumption which is not necessarily true but which has apparently led to a stagnation of thought concerning evolution of polygamy in birds. Monogamy in populations with highly skewed sex ratios is known, and polygamy occurs in populations...

Citations

... Initially, focus was on the benefits obtained by females choosing freely to mate with a mated male. These benefits include resources from high quality territories (polygyny threshold model; Verner 1964, Verner & Willson 1966, Orians 1969, efficient nest defence (Knight & Temple 1988), high quality paternal care (Sejberg et al. 2000), inclusive fitness benefits due to kinship among females mated to the same male (Grønstøl et al. 2015) or genetic benefits obtained from the polygynous male (Weatherhead & Robertson 1979, Santoro 2020. Later studies on social polygyny incorporated limitations of free female choice of mates such as a female-biased sex ratio (Smith et al. 1982, Kempenaers 1994, Mulvihill et al. 2002, Kus et al. 2017, Artemyev 2018, females being unaware of the mated status of the male (Alatalo et al. 1981, Alatalo & Lundberg 1984, aggression of competing females (Slagsvold & Lifjeld 1994), costs of mate sampling (Stenmark et al. 1988, Slagsvold & Dale 1994 and variation in female quality or condition (Forstmeier et al. 2001, Griggio et al. 2003. ...
... For example, Fierro-Calderón and Martin (2007) observed two female Violet-Chested Hummingbirds (Sternoclyta cyanopectus) in Venezuela constructing new nests on top of old nests. Verner and Engelsen (1970) noted Marsh Wrens (Cistothorus palustris) in the Pacific Northwest, USA, building stacked four-nest "apartments". A pair of Silver Gulls (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae) were observed constructing a new nest on top of an unoccupied swan (Cygnus sp.) nest in Australia (Smith & O'Connor, 1955). ...
... Male parental care is more common in species with altricial young, in which the amount of development and growth required between hatching and fledging is greater than precocial young (Ketterson and Nolan 1994). Also, males of sexually monomorphic species tend to provide a greater proportion of parental care compared to males of dimorphic species (Verner and Willson 1969, Pierotti and Annett 1993, Ketterson and Nolan al. 2013, White-headed Woodpeckers (Picoides albolarvatus, Kozma and Kroll 2013), Hairy Woodpeckers (Leuconotopicus villosus, Kozma and Kroll 2013), and Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers (Picoides minor, Wiktander et al. 2000, Rossmanith et al. 2009). Male woodpeckers sometimes incubate at equal or greater proportions compared to females and almost always incubate and brood nocturnally (Vehrencamp 2000, Pechacek et al. 2005. ...
... El tiempo transcurrido desde el amanecer es importante, particularmente las dos horas posteriores al amanecer, ya que la actividad de las aves de ciénagas disminuye conforme avanza el día (Conway 2009;Conway 2011). Esto se ha demostrado en otros trabajos, en los que el incremento de temperatura durante las primeras horas del amanecer tiene un efecto positivo sobre la actividad de algunas aves de ciénagas durante la temporada reproductiva (Verner 1965). Porzana carolina fue la única especie que incrementó su respuesta conforme avanzó el muestreo, siendo el último periodo de tiempo (0900-0959 horas) en el que tuvo el mayor número de registros; patrón similar al que detectaron Gibbs y Melvin (1993). ...
... Considering hypotheses that assume no ultimate costs of polygyny to females, the polygyny threshold model has received much attention. This model states that females accept the status of a secondary mate of a male with a high-quality territory despite his reduced contribution to parental care when it is more profitable than pairing with a monogamous male possessing a poor-quality territory (Verner 1964;Verner and Willson 1966). Female choice based on territory quality is possible with or without their knowledge of mating status of polygynous males. ...
... The timing of male arrival impacts on crucial aspects of the sedge warbler's breeding system: pre-emption of territories, mating success and behaviour leading to polygyny. It is striking that no relationship between territory quality and mating success has been demonstrated, so in contrast to the classical polygyny threshold model (Verner andWilson 1966, Orians 1969), it seems that females pay little attention to the quality of the main territory when taking mating decisions. The influence of arrival date on polyterritorial behaviour, and along this path on mating success, may explain how males acquire additional, polygynous matings, which gives them the opportunity to increase their reproductive success (cf. ...