Janna M. Andronowski's research while affiliated with Memorial University of Newfoundland and other places

Publications (31)

Article
Cellular communication in the mechanosensory osteocyte Lacuno‐Canalicular Network (LCN) regulates bone tissue remodeling throughout life. Age‐associated declines in LCN size and connectivity dysregulate mechanosensitivity to localized remodeling needs of aging or damaged tissue, compromising bone quality. Synchrotron radiation‐based micro‐Computed...
Article
The Andronowski Skeletal Collection for Histological Research (ASCHR) comprises the fastest-growing documented modern human skeletal collection in the world developed specifically for histological and imaging research. Initiated in 2017 by Dr. Janna M. Andronowski, the ASCHR provides a resource for the study of skeletal microarchitectural variabili...
Conference Paper
Learning Overview: Attendees of this presentation will be introduced to novel histological data from a longitudinal live animal experiment documenting the effects of chronic opioid exposure on cortical bone remodeling. The ultimate goal is to describe how opioid agonists, particularly morphine sulphate and fentanyl, affect microscopic structures of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Learning Overview: The goal of this presentation is to introduce a FIJI / ImageJ (NIH) toolkit for morphometric analysis of vascular pores and secondary osteons on histological images of cortical bone tissue. Impact on the Forensic Science Community: This presentation will impact the forensic science community by introducing novel software that s...
Conference Paper
Learning Overview: Following this presentation, attendees will have a basic understanding of how burning affects the microscopic structures of mammalian cortical bone and whether species differentiation can be made using qualitative and quantitative methods. Impact Statement: This presentation will impact the forensic science community by illustra...
Article
Full-text available
The hypothesis advanced is that endospanin, a highly conserved vesicle traffic protein in vertebrates, regulates leptin sensitivity in bone signaling. The effects of leptin on bones are well-studied but without consensus on whether the increases in leptin signaling stimulate bone gain or loss. The bone response may depend on leptin sensitivity, and...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the high prevalence of opioid prescription following orthopedic procedures, there is a growing need to establish an animal model system to evaluate the effects of opioids on bone remodeling. Rabbits have been employed as model organisms in orthopedic research as they exhibit well-defined cortical bone remodeling similar to humans. Existing r...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are the only mammals to have achieved powered flight. A key innovation allowing for bats to conquer the skies was a forelimb modified into a flexible wing. The wing bones of bats are exceptionally long and dynamically bend with wingbeats. Bone microarchitectural features supporting these novel performance attributes are still largely unknown....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Learning Overview: The goal of this presentation is to introduce a collection of automated image processing techniques for high-resolution imaging of cortical bone tissue. The objectives of the image processing suite include: (1) noise and artifact reduction to aid automated feature extraction; (2) streamlining researcher training by standardizing...
Conference Paper
Learning Overview: The goal of this presentation is to introduce a novel longitudinal model for studying the effects of prolonged opioid exposure on cortical bone remodeling in an animal—the rabbit—that remodels its cortical bone in a manner comparable to humans. The ultimate goal is to describe how analgesic drugs, particularly morphine and fentan...
Article
Full-text available
Bones are dynamic living organs that undergo continual change throughout life. An internal process of tissue renewal, called remodeling, removes mature microscopic packets of bone, and replaces them with new bone in a highly coordinated manner. To date, it remains difficult to directly observe and track individual remodeling events in cortical bone...
Article
Full-text available
Microbial colonization of bone is an important mechanism of postmortem skeletal degradation. However, the types and distributions of bone and tooth colonizing microbes are not well characterized. It is unknown if microbial communities vary in abundance or composition between bone element types, which could help explain differences in human DNA pres...
Article
Full-text available
Cortical bone porosity is intimately linked with remodeling, is of growing clinical interest, and is increasingly accessible by imaging. Thus, the potential of animal models of osteoporosis (OP) to provide a platform for studying how porosity develops and responds to interventions is tremendous. To date, rabbit models of OP have largely focused on...
Article
Full-text available
Bone is a dynamic and mechanically active tissue that changes in structure over the human lifespan. The products of the bone remodeling process have been studied substantially using traditional two-dimensional techniques. Recent advancements in X-ray imaging technology via desktop micro-computed tomography (µCT) and synchrotron radiation micro-comp...
Conference Paper
Learning Overview: The goals of this presentation are to: (1) describe the longitudinal effects of systemic opioids, particularly fentanyl and morphine sulfate, on behavioral and physiologic parameters; and (2) demonstrate the long-term use of transdermal fentanyl patches in the management of analgesia in a rabbit model system. Impact on the Foren...
Conference Paper
Learning Overview: The goals of this presentation are to: (1) describe how bone tissue pathology associated with opioid use (e.g., increased cortical pore density) is discernable in rib and femur microarchitecture; and (2) present high-resolution SRµCT as a tool to characterize opioid-related bone microstructural pathology with a precision that exc...
Article
Full-text available
The optimum skeletal element and bone tissue type to select for maximum nuclear DNA yield has been recently investigated. We employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to evaluate the elemental composition (atomic percentage) of cancellous and cortical bone tissue types to: (1) evaluate the use of XPS for surface chemistry analysis of cancello...
Article
This study evaluated three-dimensional (3D) vol-umetric image reconstructions to identify morphological differences of the clivus and sphenoid sinus on computed tomography (CT) scans of Chiari malformation type I (CMI) and control subjects. Axial CT images of adult females for 30 CMI subjects and 30 age and body mass index (BMI) matched controls we...
Article
This study evaluated three-dimensional (3D) volumetric image reconstructions to identify morphological differences of the clivus and sphenoid sinus on computed tomography (CT) scans of Chiari malformation type I (CMI) and control subjects. Axial CT images of adult females for 30 CMI subjects and 30 age and body mass index (BMI) matched controls wer...
Article
This study evaluated three-dimensional (3D) vol-umetric image reconstructions to identify morphological differences of the clivus and sphenoid sinus on computed tomography (CT) scans of Chiari malformation type I (CMI) and control subjects. Axial CT images of adult females for 30 CMI subjects and 30 age and body mass index (BMI) matched controls we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microbial colonization of bone is an important mechanism of post-mortem skeletal degradation. However, the types and distributions of bone and tooth colonizing microbes are not well characterized. It is unknown if microbial communities vary in abundance or composition between bone element types, which could help explain patterns of human DNA preser...
Poster
Full-text available
Osteocytes are believed to play a central role in the sustained health of bone, thus a decline in their numbers is detrimental and alterations in the lacunar-canalicular network (LCN) may be linked to accelerated bone remodeling and subsequent bone loss. Due to the preferential bias of particular bone diseases in females, such as osteoporosis, the...
Poster
Full-text available
The gross similarities between human hand and foot bones and bear paws have been well documented. Macroscopic skeletal analyses provide insight into species origin when whole bones are recovered but are frequently rendered inapplicable when bones are fragmented. In these scenarios, histological techniques are often applied. However, specific resear...
Article
Full-text available
Bone is a mechanically active, three-dimensionally (3D) complex, and dynamic tissue that changes in structure over the human lifespan. Bone tissue exists and remodels in 3D and changes over time, introducing a fourth dimension. The products of the remodelling process, secondary and fragmentary osteons, have been studied substantially using traditio...
Article
Quantifying the amount of cortical bone loss is one variable used in histological methods of adult age estimation. Measurements of cortical area tend to be subjective and additional information regarding bone loss is not captured considering cancellous bone is disregarded. We describe whether measuring bone area (cancellous + cortical area) rather...
Article
Objectives: Differentiating human from nonhuman fragmented bone is often accomplished using histological methods if the observation of gross morphology proves insufficient. Linearly oriented primary and/or secondary osteonal systems, commonly referred to as osteon bands, are described as a strong indicator of nonhuman bone, particularly the occurr...
Article
Molecular human identification has conventionally focused on DNA sampling from dense, weight-bearing cortical bone tissue, typically from femora or tibiae. A comparison of skeletal elements from three contemporary individuals demonstrated that elements with high quantities of cancellous bone yielded nuclear DNA at the highest rates, suggesting that...

Citations

... They offered new perspectives, reinforcing the need for modern human samples of references to test established methods and develop new ones based on updated methodological approaches. Thus, three decades later, there has been a significant increase in documented collections worldwide [3], diversified in nature, e.g., not all documented collections are composed of osteological remains, some are virtual collections [4], and others are histological [5]. ...
... Leptin receptor overlapping transcript (LEPROT), which is also located upstream of LEPR in the pig genome, was first described as the product of an alternate protein using the same promoter of LEPR [7] and renamed Endospanin on account of its late endosomal/Golgi localization and membrane-spanning topology [8]. In mice, LEPROT knockdown showed high leptin sensitivity and was resistant to diet-induced obesity [9], and it was thought to be a candidate for regulating leptin sensitivity [10]. ...
... Consequently, cortical pore size and shape are components of some histological age-at-death estimation methods (Andronowski & Cole, 2021). Cortical pores also concentrate mechanical stress (Ebacher et al., 2007) and increase the initiation and propagation of microcracks into fracture (Diab & Vashishth, 2005). ...
... More porous bone types-which trabecular parts of bones certainly are-have an increased bacterial presence [30], which does not directly imply increased bone degradation because certain bacterial taxa may be better adapted to exploiting skeletal material than others, and they do not digest DNA directly, but instead degrade the organic matter of bone [31]. When studying the difference in microbial colonization in compact and trabecular bones, Emmons' group [32] found that bone microstructure influences the difference in microbial communities because the microstructure predisposes ease of bacterial invasion. They concluded that microbial loading does not negatively influence skeletal DNA preservation and can indeed aid skeletal integrity. ...
... Bone bacterial communities are found to be strongly related to the microbial community of the depositional environment and the microbial diversity increases with time after exposure (Eriksen et al., 2020). The postmortem bone microbiome also varies intraindividually depending on the body region (Emmons et al., 2020). ...
... 40 µm d −1 ) [27] and radial apposition (ca. 1-3 µm d −1 ) [46,[80][81][82] imply a 1 : 40-3 : 40 gradient (1.4-4.3°) in the lamellae relative to the axis of the osteon. Figure 1d displays intra-vital calcein labels in a closing cone in cortical bone of a horse with an angular disposition of 3-7°. ...
... Alterations in the LCN may further be linked to accelerated bone remodeling and subsequent bone loss. Due to the preferential bias of particular bone diseases in females, such as osteoporosis, the exploration of age-associated sex differences has been investigated (Andronowski, Davis, Tubo, & Cooper, 2019;Ashique et al., 2017). ...
... In this case (Fig. 2), S is not correlated with Fe and this reasoning does not apply. Values for these elements also agree with those found in other studies (Andronowski et al., 2019;Reiche et al., 2003). Bone is one of the major reservoirs for S in the human body and it is mainly diet incorporated (Horovitz, 2000;Kabata-Pendias and Mukherjee, 2007;Rand and Nehlich, 2018). ...
... A substantial number of studies report evidence that CM-I is classically due to underdevelopment of the para-axial mesoderm leading to hypoplasia of the skull base and a small crowded posterior fossa [3, 8, 10, 28, 41-43, 53, 57, 58, 60]. Certain studies place emphasis on the role that the hypoplasia of the basiocciput and the clivus play in Chiari symptomatology [44,45,58]. Genetic markers found to be associated with posterior fossa morphology support the theory that certain anomalous features of CM-I are heritable [35,57]. ...
... Andronowski et al. [39][40][41] in an attempt to refine bone sample selection for nuclear DNA analysis of contemporary skeletal remains, used a SR micro-CT and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and they confirmed that soft tissue remnants within the intertrabecular spaces of cancellous tissue bones contributed to high DNA yields. Cancellous tissue bones are primarily cancellous short bones and bone epiphyses [41]. ...