Janet McLaughlin's research while affiliated with Wilfrid Laurier University and other places

Publications (32)

Article
Full-text available
Background Nine migrant agricultural workers died in Ontario, Canada, between January 2020 and June 2021. Methods To better understand the factors that contributed to the deaths of these migrant agricultural workers, we used a modified qualitative descriptive approach. A research team of clinical and academic experts reviewed coroner files of the...
Technical Report
Since 1966, the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP) has been bringing Jamaican workers to Canada on seasonal labour contracts that can last up to eight months of the year. The purpose of this report is to elucidate the ways the SAWP exposes workers to physical and psychosocial health risks that make them vulnerable to various poor health ou...
Book
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Global governance is particularly concerned about migration and asylum issues. Immigrants, Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Times of Crises: A. An International Handbook on Migration and Refugee Studies, Management Policies and Governance offers a comprehensive and cutting-edge analysis of international migration and asylum research and studies under...
Article
Full-text available
First paragraph: The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically reshaped Canadian society in just a few short weeks. At the same time, its varied impacts shine a light on pre-existing social inequities. Certain populations, including low wage workers, racial minorities, homeless people, and older and disabled residents of long-term care facilities have be...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: The intersecting vulnerabilities of migrant agricultural workers (MAWs) impact both their health and their access to health care in rural areas, yet rural clinicians' voices are rarely documented. The purpose of this study was to explore health professionals' perspectives on health care for MAWs in sending countries and rural Ontario...
Technical Report
For more than fifty years, the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP) has been bringing Jamaican farm workers to Canada every year on temporary labour contracts of up to eight months annually. To ensure a healthy seasonal labour force, SAWP workers are medically pre-screened in Jamaica each year as a prerequisite of participation in the progra...
Article
Full-text available
By examining the families and supporting social structures of Mexican 'temporary' migrant workers in Canada's Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP), this paper explains how these transnational families modify their structures in a neoliberal context. We discuss how migrants and their family members respond to changes associated with circular...
Article
Drawing on the experiences of service providers supporting live-in caregivers and migrant agricultural workers in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec), we explore how structural violence shapes the precarious conditions of female temporary foreign workers. Service providers emphasized how transnational social pressures on women to maintain e...
Article
Full-text available
Temporary farm labour migration schemes in Canada have been justified on the premise that they bolster food security for Canadians by addressing agricultural labour shortages, while tempering food insecurity in the Global South via remittances. Such appeals hinge on an ideology defining migrants as racialized outsiders to Canada. Drawing on qualita...
Chapter
Increasingly social-justice oriented food movements have been paying attention to a long-neglected and largely invisible aspect of “local” food production—the lives and wellbeing of the “imported” workers who make labour intensive agriculture possible, and profitable, for many operations. Indeed, many farmers acknowledge that migrant workers are th...
Technical Report
This report is produced by UN Women’s Economic Empowerment Section for the “Promoting and Protecting Women Migrant Workers’ Labour and Human Rights” Project, supported by the European Union. This report is the second of three designed to build on the growing body of scholarship pertaining to gender and migration, and is a resource for the creation...
Article
Full-text available
Under Canada’s Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP), migrant workers come to Canada for up to eight months each year, without their families, to work as temporary foreign workers in agriculture. Using a ‘whole worker’ industrial relations approach, which emphasizes intersections among work, family and community relations, this article assess...
Chapter
Migrant labour is a major component of the contemporary global economy, integrated across various sectors, industries and national contexts. In recent years, international instruments have focussed on recognizing and protecting migrant workers’ rights, however, their health considerations have been largely neglected in both policy and practice. Mig...
Article
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Four books published between 2013 and 2014 make a vital contribution towards understanding the political and ideological tools by which states and employers construct hyper-exploitable agricultural workers. In this review essay, we provide an assessment of how these books have advanced our understandings of migrant farm labour regimes in local and...
Article
This article explains how migrant Mexican agricultural workers experience situations of risk that make them structurally vulnerable in the area of health. Although managed systems of migration, such as the Canadian Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program (Programa de Trabajadores Agrícolas Temporales) have diverse advantages -legality, benefits, form...
Article
Full-text available
Structural Vulnerability and HealtH among SeaSonal agri­ cultural WorkerS in canada. this article explains how migrant Mexican agricultural workers experience situations of risk that make them structurally vulnerable in the area of health. Although managed systems of migration, such as the canadian Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program (Programa de...
Conference Paper
There are approximately 40,000 migrant agricultural workers (MAWs) employed on temporary labour contracts in Canada, primarily from Mexico and the Caribbean. Although they have legal access to provincial health care under Canada’s “universal system,” these workers experience numerous practical barriers, including: long work hours; limited clinic ho...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on a survey of nearly 600 migrant farm workers in Ontario, Canada, we investigate the ways in which the liminality of temporary migrants is both conditioning and consequential in terms of health for these migrants. In particular, we demonstrate how the liminality inherent in managed temporary migration programmes creates the conditions for...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Approximately 40 000 migrant farm workers are employed annually in Canada through temporary foreign worker programs. Workers experiencing health conditions that prevent ongoing work are normally repatriated to their home country, which raises concerns about human rights and health equity. In this study, we present data on the reasons f...
Article
Full-text available
Over 20,000 temporary foreign agricultural workers come to Ontario each year, primarily from Mexico and the Caribbean. Agricultural workers are exposed to a number of occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. This article discusses the various OHS protections available to workers and their limitations, and analyzes the specific challenges that te...
Article
Full-text available
Over 20,000 temporary foreign agricultural workers come to Ontario each year, primarily from Mexico and the Caribbean. Agricultural workers are exposed to a number of occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. This article discusses the various OHS protections available to workers and their limitations, and analyzes the specific challenges that te...

Citations

... These issues became particularly salient during the Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19 pandemic) which involved social distancing measures to be put in place and prohibited many in-person interactions like conducting in-person interviews, focus groups, and surveys. While there have been few cross-sectional reports indicating migrant farmworkers faced heightened vulnerabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic [11,12], to date, there has been no published longitudinal study of the mental health of migrant farmworkers in the U.S. during the pandemic. Even beyond the pandemic, there is great utility in understanding the best methods to survey this important vulnerable working population. ...
... Several structural factors exacerbate the risk of workplace abuse in the SAWP (Bhuyan et al., 2018;Robillard et al., 2018). First, the SAWP allows employers to dismiss and deport migrant workers without sufficient avenues for workers to appeal this process (Cole et al., 2019;Cortina-Castro & Kobayashi, 2020;Strauss & McGrath, 2017). Since SAWP workers are assigned temporary work visas linked to specific employers, workplace dismissal can jeopardize the immigration status of migrant labourers (Binford, 2019;Edmiston, 2020;Preibisch, 2004;Strauss & McGrath, 2017). ...
... A study based on a coroner's report of 9 agricultural workers' deaths in Ontario between March 2020 and June 2021 identified four domains of risk accounting for the disproportionate number of casualties: (1) recruitment and travel risks; (2) missed steps and substandard conditions of healthcare monitoring, quarantine, and isolation; (3) barriers to accessing healthcare; and (4) missing information (Caxaj et al., 2022). Their dependency on employers for work authorization, residency status, and housing make it difficult for agricultural workers to report health issues and crowded living conditions (Caxaj et al., 2022;Weiler & McLaughlin, 2019). Due to these vulnerabilities, this group has suffered disproportionately throughout the pandemic. ...
... Las familias de origen mexicano en Estados Unidos, por ejemplo, han dado lugar a nuevos mercados entre ambos países, que se han emparejado a procesos políticos y económicos como el TLCAN (Barros, 2003, citado en Ojeda, 2009). Adicionalmente, hay una atención brindada a los sentimientos y al cuidado, entendiéndolos a través de las repercusiones emocionales de la ausencia de parientes migrantes, lo que enfrenta a las familias a una dinámica que puede ser hiriente, pero, a su vez, representada como una vía para la movilidad social (Díaz Mendiburo et al., 2018;Sandoval Forero et al., 2021). Asimismo, la investigación de familias transnacionales en Colombia ha sido esclarecedora en la importancia de las remesas económicas y sociales en la configuración de estas familias, enfatizando en cómo las dinámicas de género y las relaciones intergeneracionales influyen en las representaciones que los miembros de la familia tienen sobre la misma (Rivas y Gonzálvez, 2011). ...
... Most workers from Mexico have limited or no knowledge of the English language. Although Caribbean workers are generally fluent in English, there are significant differences in socio-cultural norms and behaviors that make navigating life in Canada difficult and stressful, and this is especially challenging for those who experience issues related to literacy [44][45][46][47][48]. ...
... Although the specific findings and recommendations were made with the Ontario, Canada context in mind, they can be extrapolated to other jurisdictions. Structural vulnerabilities, including precarious migration and work status, familial separation, poor living and working conditions, and systemic barriers to healthcare, benefits, protections, and rights, are common experiences across many migrant worker populations internationally, collectively leading to higher risks of injury, illness, and death [107][108][109]. Therefore, adequate prevention strategies, improved healthcare access, and robust injury and death reporting, as well as inclusive methods to help surviving family members navigate bereavement entitlements, are of global relevance and should be explored further in future research. ...
... However, a greater number of problems or abuses have been identified during the stay and work performance, which tarnish the image of these programs in the destination societies. There is also a large volume of academic and trade union research on labor conditions at destination (Binford, 2019;Brooks, 2018;Carrasco, 2017;Heidbrink, 2019;Hughes, 2014;Moorefield, 2019;Muir, 2015;Robillard, 2018;Wallis , 2019;Weiler, 2020;CDM, 2020), while those dedicated to investigating the effects of these programs on families and communities of origin, are notably fewer. ...
... Under the SAWP, workers are allowed to work in Canada for a maximum of 8 months a year [26]; although the program permits circularity, SAWP workers must return to their countries of origin by December 15th of their year of arrival. Prior research suggests that on average SAWP workers return to work in Canada for approximately 10 years, with a good proportion returning to work in Canadian agriculture for several decades, challenging the category of 'temporary' in the classic sense of the term [27,28]. ...
... Similarly, Foster and Taylor (2013), in exploring the notion of community, found that the transnational living of migrants precludes them from their work communities and instead creates a conflicting existence. Hennebry et al. (2016) explain that TFWs are in a temporary liminal state: ...
... Most workers do not feel comfortable disclosing health information to their employers. Thus, many work through injuries and illnesses rather than asking employers for care 72 . If migrants sustain a workplace illness or injury, they are often repatriated before fully recovering and may face immense obstacles to accessing workplace compensation 73 . ...