Jane Margolis's research while affiliated with University of California, Los Angeles and other places

Publications (39)

Book
A diverse group of teenage friends learn how computing can be personally and politically empowering and why all students need access to computer science education. This lively graphic novel follows a diverse group of teenage friends as they discover that computing can be fun, creative, and empowering. Taylor, Christine, Antonio, and Jon seem like t...
Article
The Computer Science for All movement is bringing CS to K-12 classrooms across the nation. At the same time, new technologies created by computer scientists have been reproducing existing inequities that directly impact today's youth, while being “promoted and perceived as more objective or progressive than the discriminatory systems of a previous...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Context Overlaying Computer Science (CS) courses on top of inequitable schooling systems will not move us toward “CS for All.” This paper prioritizes the perspectives of minoritized students enrolled in high school CS classrooms across a large, urban school district in the Western United States, to help inform how CS can truly be for...
Conference Paper
Efforts to broaden participation in computing address how systemic school structures, educator preparation, and curriculum can provide inclusive learning spaces for all students. The emerging multiplicity of scholarship in computer science (CS) education forwards diverse voices, perspectives, and positionalities, and together, provide a rich set of...
Article
Full-text available
Recent discussions of making have focused on developing out-of-school makerspaces and activities to provide more equitable and enriching learning opportunities for youth. Yet school classrooms present a unique opportunity to help broaden access, diversify representation, and deepen participation in making. In turning to classrooms, we want to under...
Article
This article describes the impact of in-classroom coaching for computer science (CS) educators. Coaching is a way to support teachers in their classroom while teachers master new curricula or educational approaches and is not evaluative in purpose. Using qualitative methods to analyze computer science classroom observations, teacher surveys, teache...
Chapter
This chapter builds upon research findings that identified pernicious belief systems and structural inequalities that limit opportunities for students of color and females to have access to computer science learning opportunities (Margolis, Estrella, Goode, Holme, & Nao, 2008). The chapter shows how President Obama's agenda of Computer Science for...
Article
This article describes the importance that high school computer science teachers place on a teachers’ professional learning community designed around an inquiry- and equity-oriented approach for broadening participation in computing. Using grounded theory to analyze four years of teacher surveys and interviews from the Exploring Computer Science (E...
Article
Effective teaching practices for broadening participation in computer science.
Conference Paper
In recent years, the computer science education community has shown strong commitment to broadening participation in computing in K-12 classrooms. Educational research highlights the critical role of professional development in supporting teachers to attract and effectively teach underrepresented students in computing. In this paper we present the...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the fact that computer science (CS) is the driver of technological innovations across all disciplines and aspects of our lives, including participatory media, high school CS too commonly fails to incorporate the perspectives and concerns of low-income students of color. This article describes a partnership program – Exploring Computer Scien...
Article
Full-text available
EduBits, your quarterly roundup of ACM educational activities, focuses on education policy and the way it affects the K--12 educational space. Cameron Wilson, Director of Public Policy for ACM, gives us a glimpse into the challenges of improving CS education ...
Article
Welcome to the third installment of EduBits, your quarterly pipeline to new and exciting happenings in the world of ACM education. Starting with this March issue of ACM Inroads, we are introducing a new thread that will highlight principal educational ...
Article
This article will detail efforts to broaden participation in computing in urban schools through a comprehensive reform effort of curricular development, teacher professional development, and policy changes. Beginning with an account of the curricular development of Exploring Computer Science, we will describe the inquiry-based research that underli...
Chapter
Das Buch bietet einen Einstieg in das breite Spektrum der Genderforschung in den unterschiedlichsten wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen. Es will zu einem breiten, hochschulweiten Dialog anregen und Möglichkeiten aufzeigen, wie man die Perspektive der Chancengleichheit über die Berücksichtigung von Gender-Aspekten in Forschung und Lehre wirksam in das Q...
Chapter
This chapter presents four themes that suggest some reasons why and how high school female students are — or are not — drawn into the field of computer science through their high school experiences. First, despite the national and local initiatives to “bring schools into the twenty-first century,” researchers discovered that few computer science le...
Article
To better understand why so few students of color and women study computer science during high school and college, we have interviewed urban students, teachers, and administrators in three Los Angeles high schools over the past three years. One important finding of this study was the lack of clarity around the nature of computer science as an acade...
Article
The fact that information technology is becoming the lingua franca of 21st-century business makes it of more than passing interest that the proportion of women selecting and succeeding in the field is in decline. In Margolis and Fisher's Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing, the authors analyze the problem and report on how it is being parti...
Article
Our research was conceived out of a desire to understand why so few underrepresented students of color are learning computer science at the high school level. High school is a critical time for pre-college preparation and for getting on the right "track" for college and future career opportunities. Yet, by college the number of students of color ob...
Conference Paper
We recount some of the most significant and colorful findings of our four-year study of gender issues in the undergraduate computer science program at Carnegie Mellon. We also discuss the subsequent dramatic increase in the number of women in the program. We conclude with recommendations for the most generally useful and effective actions departmen...
Article
In the decade since Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press, 2002) was published, educational institutions have coalesced around the mission of increasing women's participation in computing. Yet, despite the uptick of interest in computer science majors and the surge of technology shaping all aspects of our lives, the numbers of wome...
Article
In the fall of 1995, just seven of 95 students entering the undergraduate program in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University were women. In 2000, 54 of 130, or 42%, were women. What happened? This article presents a brief history of the transformation at Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science, and the research project that lay behind i...
Article
For nearly four years (1995-9), we have interviewed female and male computer science students about their experiences studying computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, in one of the top computer science departments in the country (USA). We heard differences in orientations to computing in men's and women's interviews when they arrive at the...
Conference Paper
For the past year, we have been studying the experiences of undergraduate women studying computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, with a specific eye toward understanding the influences and processes whereby they attach themselves to or detach themselves from the field. This report, midway through the two-year project, recaps the goals and m...
Article
For the past year, we have been studying the experiences of undergraduate women studying computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, with a specific eye toward understanding the influences and processes whereby they attach themselves to or detach themselves from the field. This report, midway through the two-year project, recaps the goals and m...

Citations

... While we believe the concept of unblackboxing is a powerful one for designing hands-on, expressive engagement in making, it needs to help young people look under the hood of computational devices and computing as a field -a set of histories, relationships, and human systems. This view returns to the foundations of unblackoxing as a critique of social systems [19,38] and aligns with continued constructionist programs that aim to position young people as critics, producers and civic participants [48,49]. ...
... Various equity-oriented strategies have arisen, but the work to truly carry out this vision remains ongoing and complex, as educators, policymakers, and various levels of government seek to align around what a shared vision and plan for action should look like [45,51]. Despite these efforts, there remains a need to hear from students from underrepresented, marginalized, lower-income, POC communities [46]. Doing so would develop new understandings about broadening participation in CS and brings focus toward culture, identity, and lived experiences. ...
... Recently, scholars and public figures have made a call for "Computer Science for All" 2 to reduce inequities and make learning more accessible in and out of schools [18,40]. Various equity-oriented strategies have arisen, but the work to truly carry out this vision remains ongoing and complex, as educators, policymakers, and various levels of government seek to align around what a shared vision and plan for action should look like [45,51]. Despite these efforts, there remains a need to hear from students from underrepresented, marginalized, lower-income, POC communities [46]. ...
... Scholars advocating learning communities consider students' participation in knowledge sharing as a critical component in building and advancing their shared understanding (Bielaczyc & Collins, 1999). Furthermore, for effective and meaningful knowledge sharing that facilitates students' learning performance, three dimensions of social capital are often emphasized: structure for students to share, discuss, and collaborate (e.g., Yuan & Kim, 2014); students' sense of belongingness and willingness to share (e.g., Chang & Lee, 2012); and an understanding of one another's strengths and expertise (e.g., Fields et al., 2018). ...
... ECS professional development includes all seven (Goode et al., 2014). Access to coaches for ECS teachers provides a sense of collaboration, improved pedagogy, and improved content knowledge (Margolis et al., 2017). The CPS ECS professional development program also offers mentoring through the Accelerate ECS4All coaching program. ...
... These findings were also supported by many previous studies on social psychology, which highlighted that men are more logical compared to women and very task-oriented [33]. Moreover, numerous studies have addressed the reason why females are less probable to use technology, and why they do not continue in the discipline (e.g., [30,40]. Some reasons listed by Lazowska [26] points to the lack of role models in terms of the separation-related and unfriendly classroom environments. ...
... Multiple factors account for varied abilities, including students with exceptionalities, students learning English as a second language, and students from under-resourced communities. At the national level, there have been efforts (e.g., CSforALL) to develop computing materials and strategies aimed at reaching all learners (Margolis & Goode, 2016;Smith, 2016) was launched to broaden participation in computing for traditionally underrepresented students in the field. Acting toward this goal, efforts have been made to dispel stereotypes about who does CS (Margolis, 2010) and resist sorting biases that determine student potential. ...
... Creating a space for collegial discussion about teaching was, in fact, one of my objectives for the seminars, although Professor Blair had not known it. The topic of the penultimate seminar was professional learning communities (PLCs; Fulton & Britton, 2011;Hilliard, 2012;Ryoo et al., 2015) and communities of practice (CoPs; Blankenship & Ruona, 2007;Gehrke & Kezar, 2017 Building community between students, among professors, and across the whole department, took on new importance for participants during the study; therefore, community building events were included as part of the CSRDE's mandate for moving forward after the research concluded. ...
... The area that overlaps most with CT is focused on algorithmic thinking (Ragonis, 2012). A few scholars such as Margolis, Goode, and Ryoo (2015) have studied CS teachers' pedagogical practices, such as inquiry-based strategies, but not specifically how pedagogy connected with CT or CS concepts. ...
... Teaching CT as disconnected from daily life or without being associated with any discipline causes students to have problems in learning CT concepts and negatively affects their motivation to learn (Goode, Estrella, and Margolis 2006). Thus, in the current study, CT teaching self-efficacy beliefs of pre-service teachers were examined by considering CT concepts in the context of STEM. ...