James H. Gilmore's scientific contributions

Publications (25)

Article
All too often fitness centers, medical providers, colleges, and organizations in many other industries seek to distinguish themselves only on the quality, convenience, and experience of what they sell, say the authors. It’s not that those things aren’t important. But they matter only as means to the ends that people seek. Too many organizations los...
Book
Time is limited. Attention is scarce. Are you engaging your customers? Apple Stores, Disney, LEGO, Starbucks. Do these names conjure up images of mere goods and services, or do they evoke something more—something visceral? Welcome to the Experience Economy, where businesses must form unique connections in order to secure their customers’ affectio...
Article
Purpose – In little more than a decade, experience thinking has influenced the development of new business models in a wide variety of enterprises. Design/methodology/approach – The authors describe best practices for five approaches Five approaches are noteworthy: Experiential marketing (EM or XM). Digital experiences using the Internet and other...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – To succeed in the rapidly evolving experience economy executives must think differently about how they create economic value for their customers. Design/methodology/approach – Five value-creating opportunities are likely to drive further progress in the dynamic experience economy: customizing goods; enhancing services; charging for exper...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose ‐ As more companies wrap their offering with "an experience," it is important that experience authenticity is understood to be a critical consumer sensibility. This paper aims to address this issue.Design/methodology/approach ‐ The authors have studied experience marketing and found that consumers often choose to buy or not buy based on how...
Article
Full-text available
Marketing flounders at many companies today, as people have become relatively immune to messages broadcast at them. The way to reach customers is to create an experience they can participate in and enjoy, the new offering frontier. To be clear, this article is not about “experiential marketing” – that is, giving marketing promotions more sensory ap...
Article
By infusing your hospitality operation with a theme—explicitly stated or creatively subtle— you can improve your guests' experience and (not incidentally) your profits.
Article
Full-text available
Goods and services are no longer enough. There is a fundamental shift going on in the very fabric of all developed economies. That shift is not to an information economy, much less to a knowledge economy. The new economy emerging is now based on an age-old but newly identified economic offering: experiences.
Article
Full-text available
Health care is no longer just about healing: patients want a "personal transformation," a way to be made whole again. How can your organization think about making the play from services to experiences to transformations, but without your organization's dropping the ball?
Article
Full-text available
The authors describe and explain the progression of economic value, showing that customizing a good turns it into a service, customizing a service turns it into an experience, and customizing an experience turns it into a transformation. Businesses that wish to prosper in the emerging experience economy should begin by mass customizing their goods...
Article
First there was agriculture, then manufactured goods, and eventually services. Each change represented a step up in economic value--a way for producers to distinguish their products from increasingly undifferentiated competitive offerings. Now, as services are in their turn becoming commoditized, companies are looking for the next higher value in a...
Article
Virtually all executives today recognize the need to provide outstanding service to customers. Focusing on the customer, however, is both an imperative and a potential curse. In their desire to become customer driven, many companies have resorted to inventing new programs and procedures to meet every customer's request. But as customers and their n...

Citations

... 2008) remarked in this context that it is important for companies to make memorable experiences and create the stage for greater economic value rather than simply making goods and delivering services. Moreover, selling services are not enough to differentiate offerings; it is required to provide memorable experiences to the hotel customers (Gilmore & Pine, 2002). Consequently, customers seeking unique and personal encounters with company products and services are willing to pay more for memorable experiences (Ali, Hussain & Ragavan, 2014). ...
... Müze iç mekân tasarımları (vitrinlerin seçimi ve konumu, ışıklandırma, çizim rekonstrüksiyonları, yönlendirme tasarımı, bilgilendirme yazıları ve tasarımları, renk seçimleri ve uyumu vb.) veya arkeolojik eser sunma biçimi (replika alanların birebir oluşturulması, eseri merkeze alan enstalasyon uygulamaları) müzelerdeki estetik deneyime vurgu yapmaktadır. Eğlence deneyimi, turizm faaliyetinde bulunan bireylerin iyi vakit geçirme ve deneyim sürecinde eğlenmesi olarak tanımlanmaktadır (Pine ve Gilmore, 1999). Kaçış deneyimi, turistin bireysel rutininden gündelik rutinden sıyrılma durumudur. ...
... An understanding of visitor experiences and experiential environments provides a dual demand and supply approach, and it is this to which we now turn our attention to. Pine and Gilmore (1999) work on the experience economy offers one of the earliest entry point to understanding tourism experience and the role of creativity. According to them, the experience sector encompasses retail, food/beverage, entertainment, cultural, and accommodation industries in which consumers pay for experience-laden services. ...
... There is a rich body of research focusing on how WCC affects consumer behavior (for reviews see: Moura et al., 2016;Vyncke & Brengman, 2010). However, WCA has thus far been overlooked despite evidence on the important role that authenticity plays in consumption choices (Holt, 2002;Pine & Gilmore, 2008). Our study therefore expands prior research focusing on WCC (Bartikowski et al., 2020;Bartikowski & Singh, 2014;Bartikowski et al., 2016;Ko et al., 2015;Singh et al., 2015) as we consider that culture-laden website design elicits other mental categorizations as well. ...
... It has long been noted that consumers value the consumption process and the consumption experience itself (e.g., Holbrook and Hirschman 1982;Pine and Gilmore 1999). In recent years, technological innovation has changed the focus of consumption from material to experience (Morewedge et al. 2021). ...
... Most people seek to engage in experiences that offer emotional value as well as a learning process to create long-lasting positive changes, personal growth, inner fulfilment, and wellbeing (Kirillova et al., 2017b;Sheldon, 2020;Soulard, McGehee, & Stern, 2019). One of the core tenets of the transformation economy is that it encourages the fulfilment of personal aspirations (Pine & Gilmore, 2016) by enabling temporary events and journeys that allow for epistemic expansion (Pung, Gnoth, & Del Chiappa, 2020) and exploration of the self (Neuhofer et al., 2020). One context that best reflects this state of temporality is tourism and events (Galvani, Lew, & Perez, 2020;Pung et al., 2020). ...
... This research paper builds on the previous research by the author (Havir, 2020) on experience economy and transformation economy (Pine, Gilmore, 1997, 2011, where the links between human perception, human needs fulfilment, human resources, quality of life, design, marketing metrics, and the experience, considered from the perspective of psychology and philosophy, are hypothesized and continues in the multidisciplinary research with the aim to establish the links between other possible concepts related to this topic to present the broader perspective on the customer experience phenomenon, its antecedents, and consequences within the fields of macromarketing and behavioural economy. Second, this research is based on the direction of positive marketing (Gopaldas, 2015;Mittelstaedt et al., 2015;Scott et al., 2014). ...
... Nature Park Specialities can be seen as experiential products [57], to various extents. In guided tours and production workshops for drinks, foods, and soap, among others, service is the primary product, whereas the self-made goods are more an add-on. ...
... Technological Forecasting & Social Change 175 (2022) 121382 consuming as instruments of differentiation of products and services in the market. For Gilmore (1999 andB.J. 2008), in a world where businesses offer more and more deliberately and sensationally staged experiences, consumers increasingly choose to buy or not buy based on how genuine they perceive an offering to be. The study of experiential marketing is new and has only recently entered the academic mainstream. ...