James D. Gardner's research while affiliated with Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology and other places

Publications (46)

Article
An incomplete salamander dentary (AMNH FARB 22965) described herein from the upper Maastrichtian Lance Formation, Wyoming, USA, exhibits a puzzling suite of features. Four features—a prominent bony trough extending anteriorly and curving upwards along the lingual surface of the ramus, lack of an obvious Meckelian fossa or groove, an apparent gap...
Article
Albanerpetontids are an extinct clade of superficially salamander-like lissamphibians that range from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian)-Early Pleistocene and have a primarily Laurasian distribution. The best Cenozoic record for the clade is in Europe, where two species in the type genus Albanerpeton Estes & Hoffstetter, 1976 occur in over 40 localiti...
Article
Full-text available
The Late Cretaceous anuran Hungarobatrachus szukacsi Szentesi & Venczel, 2010 was erected for isolated ilia and tibio-fibulae from the Santonian-age Iharkút locality, in northwestern Hungary. On the strength of ilial features, H. szukacsi was interpreted as a neobatrachian and possible ranoid, making it the only pre-Cenozoic occurrence for both cla...
Article
The Late Cretaceous anuran Hungarobatrachus szukacsi Szentesi & Venczel, 2010 was erected for isolated ilia and tibio-fibulae from the Santonian-age Iharkút locality, in northwestern Hungary. On the strength of ilial features, H. szukacsi was interpreted as a neobatrachian and possible ranoid, making it the only pre-Cenozoic occurrence for both cla...
Article
Albanerpetontids are an extinct clade of salamander-like lissamphibians characterised by features such as fused frontals and sculptured skull roof bones. Here we provide a histological analysis of the fused and sculptured frontals in two Late Cretaceous species of the type genus Albanerpeton sensu lato that differ in body size: moderate-sized ‘Al.’...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Osteological information for extant amphibians and reptiles is scattered through numerous papers and books; this hinders a precise perception of what is known and what is not. In order to aggregate in a synthetic way the available published information and to determine which taxa and topics warrant further attention, we started to compile an online...
Conference Paper
We report diagnostic, albeit fragmentary, material representing the earliest known appearance of the only extant bowfin subfamily, the Amiinae, from the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation, in central Utah, U. S. A. The remains occur at the Early–Late Cretaceous boundary, having been dated to the latest Albian–earliest Cenomanian by...
Conference Paper
Sedimentary basins in Anatolia preserve a rich record of Neogene terrestrial environments at the crossroads between Asia and Europe. Deciphering the geological evolution of these basins is essential for understanding how this fine record came to be preserved. In a reciprocal fashion, the fossil record allows for correlating between basins and for r...
Article
Anurans are characterized by a biphasic lifecyle, consisting of radically different larval (“tadpole”) and adult (“frog”) morphs. Although the fossil record for tadpoles is more limited compared to the record for frogs, it is more extensive and informative than generally appreciated. The tadpole fossil record consists exclusively of body fossils, o...
Article
Full-text available
The Mesozoic record for anurans (i.e., crown-clade frogs) in North America extends from the Early Jurassic to terminal Cretaceous. Here we review the record for middle – late Campanian (= Judithian North American Land Mammal Age and ca. 79–73 million years ago) anurans from the North American Western Interior. Judithian anuran fossils (mostly isola...
Article
Lissamphibians (frogs, salamanders, caecilians, and the extinct Albanerpetontidae) have a near global distribution. Africa, its associated islands (especially Madagascar and the Seychelles) and the Arabian Plate are home to about 27 families (including 15 endemic) and 1135 species of extant lissamphibians or about 38 and 15 %, respectively, of the...
Article
Over the course of his nearly five decades long career, the Czech herpetologist and palaeontologist Zbyněk Roček has become well known for his research on lower vertebrates, especially on the origins, anatomy, functional morphology, development, ecology, systematics and fossil record of frogs. Zbyněk has also been a teacher and supervisor, a genero...
Article
Uppermost Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) continental deposits in the Transylvanian region of western Romania contain a diverse and important assemblage of fossil vertebrates, including lissamphibians. Bones of anurans (frogs) and albanerpetontids are abundantly represented at multiple vertebrate microfossil localities in the region, but there continues...
Article
The frog Tyrrellbatrachus brinkmani, gen. et sp. nov., is described on the basis of seven incomplete maxillae from vertebrate microfossil localities in the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation, in the Dinosaur Provincial Park area, southeastern Alberta, Canada. The maxillae are distinctive in a unique suite of features related to si...
Article
Although stagodontid marsupials are among the most distinctive mammals of Late Cretaceous age in North America, there remain significant gaps in knowledge of their dental anatomy, particularly that of the stratigraphically oldest genus, Eodelphis Matthew, 1916. We report here on stagodontid specimens from the Judithian Belly River Group of southeas...
Article
The Çameli Basin in southwestern Anatolia preserves a sequence of fossiliferous sediments that record the Pliocene and early Pleistocene faunal development in the area. Here, we present the fauna of Ericek, a locality near the bottom of the sequence. The locality is rich in fish remains, particularly pharyngeal teeth of the cyprinids Barbus, Carass...
Article
The Frenchman and Ravenscrag formations of southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, record an apparently continuous sequence of nonmarine clastic sediments across the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary. Extensive exposures of these fossil-rich sediments occur in the Frenchman River Valley, near the towns of Ravenscrag, Eastend, and Shaunavon, and have...
Article
Full-text available
The extinct Eopelobates (Eocene of western North America; Eocene–Pliocene of Europe) and Pelobates (Oligocene–Recent of Europe; Recent of northern Africa and the Middle East) are superficially toad-like anurans that are united within the family Pelobatidae mainly on the basis of a unique, tripartite frontoparietal complex. Both genera have a relati...
Article
Full-text available
The Mesozoic and Palaeocene record of lissamphibians (i.e. anurans, caudates, gymnophionans and albanerpetontids) in North America is reviewed on the basis of over 400 published and unpublished occurrences from 61 geological formations. The record is heavily biased towards isolated bones, although some associated and articulated skeletons and rare...
Article
Full-text available
Quaternary herpetofaunas from eight palaeontological localities in western Canada (British Columbia: Bear Flat; Alberta: Eagle Cave, January Cave, Rat's Nest Cave, Hand/Wintering Hills, Fletcher Site, Stampede Site and Little Fish Lake) are described in detail for the first time. Identifications of taxa from these localities include frogs (Rana sp....
Conference Paper
The presence of both dry and wet ecosystems in the Late Neogene of Anatolia was already suggested by Ünay & De Bruijn (1998), on the basis of a series of faunules. Two localities in the Çameli Basin that were studied in full by master students in Leiden now clearly confirm that indeed wet environments existed next to the typical steppe localities....
Article
Full-text available
2013. A new albanerpetontid amphibian from the Barremian (Early Cretaceous) Wes− sex Formation of the Isle of Wight, southern England. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 58 (2): 295–324. A new albanerpetontid, Wesserpeton evansae gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous (Barremian) Wessex Formation of the Isle of Wight, southern England, is described...
Article
The Albanerpetontidae, small salamander-like tetrapods from the Middle Jurassic–Neogene of Laurasia and northern Africa, are widely considered to be lissamphibians; however, relationships among major lissamphibian clades are unresolved. A recently identified, isolated, and three-dimensionally preserved neurocranium (early Pliocene, Hungary) referre...
Article
Full-text available
Since its discovery in 2000, the Iharkút fossil locality in the Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) Csehbánya Formation of western Hungary has yielded a taxonomically diverse assemblage of terrestrial and freshwater vertebrates that continue to provide insights into the diversity, paleobiogeography, and paleoecology of Late Cretaceous vertebrates in Europ...
Article
Beginning in 1962 and extending to the present, Richard C. Fox and colleagues have named 87 species of fossil vertebrates (1 fish, 4 amphibians, 2 choristoderes, 12 lizards, 1 crocodile, 1 dinosaur, 2 “pelycosaurs”, 2 non-mammalian therapsids, and 62 mammals) and numerous new supraspecific taxa. Virtually all of these species continue to be accepte...
Article
The scapherpetontid salamander Piceoerpeton is known from the latest Cretaceous to middle Paleogene of North America and was the last surviving member of that paedomorphic family. A suite of vertebral features differentiates Piceoerpeton from other scapherpetontids, including three atlantal features that are autapomorphic within the family: odontoi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Thanks to their relatively robust build and distinctive structure, isolated ilia are among the most commonly recovered anuran bones from fossil micovertebrate sites. Across the spectrum of known anurans, there is considerable variation in features of the ilium. With some caveats, these features may be useful for assigning anuran ilia to biological...
Article
Full-text available
Screen-washing of matrix from 37 Upper Cretaceous microvertebrate localities in southern Utah, USA, yielded a rich sample of anuran disarticulated bones, including nearly 200 ilia. Because the bones are relatively small and delicate and were subject to pre-mortem transport and unavoidable damage when the fossiliferous matrix was collected and proce...
Article
Full-text available
Several hundred isolated anuran bones recovered from 37 localities in southern Utah, USA, provide a relatively continuous record of the evolution of anuran assemblages in the central part of the North American Western Interior that spans almost 25 million years, from the early Cenomanian to the late Campanian. Although it is difficult to associate...
Article
Ilia of anurans (frogs) and urodeles (salamanders) are commonly recovered from microvertebrate fossil localities. Ilia in these clades are distinctive when complete and articulated with the rest of the pelvic girdle, but when preserved as isolated and broken fossils they may appear superficially similar. Reliable identification of urodele ilia is f...
Article
The Albanerpetontidae are Middle Jurassic-Miocene amphibians that have variously been regarded as caudates (salamanders), a clade distinct from caudates, or incertae sedis lissamphibians. Here I test for monophyly of the Albanerpetontidae and examine the affinities of the group, within the framework of a more inclusive Temnospondyli, by performing...
Article
Full-text available
The Albanerpetontidae are salamander-like, Middle Jurassic to Neogene lissamphibians from Laurasia and North Africa. Extensive series of albanerpetontid bones recently identified in collections from the Csarnóta 2 locality, south-central Hungary, extend the temporal range of the clade forward about seven million years from the middle Miocene to the...
Article
A revised diagnosis and expanded description are presented for the amphiumid salamander Proamphiuma cretacea based on the original topotypic collection of vertebrae and on new atlantes, trunk vertebrae, and caudal vertebrae from the holotype locality. P. cretacea is the type and only species in the genus and is reliably known only from the Bug Cree...
Article
The sirenid salamander Habrosaurus is revised and redescribed based on skull elements and vertebrae from the middle Campanian–middle Palaeocene of the North American Western Interior. Habrosaurus differs from the Cenozoic (Eocene–Recent) sirenids Siren and Pseudobranchus in a suite of cranial and vertebral plesiomorphies, one vertebral character of...
Article
Full-text available
A third albanerpetontid genus, Anoualerpeton gen. nov., is erected for two new species: An. unicus sp. nov. (type species) from the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian) of Morocco and An. priscus sp. nov. from the Middle Jurassic (late Bathonian) of England. Anoualerpeton differs from the exclusively Laurasian albanerpetontid genera Albanerpeton (Early Cr...
Article
The first phylogenetic analysis of the Euramerican Early Cretaceous–Miocene genus Albanerpeton is presented based on 16 characters of the jaws, frontals, and inferred body size scored for the seven recognized species in the genus and three other albanerpetontid taxa. Monophyly of Albanerpeton is corroborated and nested sets of synapomorphies yield...
Article
A recent cranial reconstruction for the Albanerpetontidae, a Middle Jurassic-Miocene lissamphibian clade, includes four putative novelties associated with the anterior part of the skull. Albanerpetontids retain the primitive temnospondyl state for each character: the frontals anteriorly contact the paired nasals, rather than separating the nasals t...
Article
Three Late Cretaceous albanerpetontids are identified, diagnosed, and described herein based on jaws and frontals from the North American Western Interior: Albanerpeton nexuosus Estes, 1981 and A. galaktion Fox & Naylor, 1982 (both Campanian and Maastrichtian) and A. gracilis n. sp. (middle Campanian). Membership of each in Albanerpeton Estes & Hof...
Article
Newly discovered fossils described herein from Utah, USA, help fill a sizeable gap in the Cretaceous record of the Albanerpetontidae and provide information on the evolution of the family during the latest Early–middle Late Cretaceous. The geologically oldest record of sympatry among albanerpetontids is in the Mussentuchit Member (latest Albian–ear...
Article
Albanerpeton arthridion is rediagnosed and redescribed based on jaws, frontals, atlantes and humeri from the Lower Cretaceous (uppermost Aptian-middle Albian), Antlers Formation of Oklahoma and Texas, USA. Frontals described herein for the first time for A. arthridion confirm that the species belongs in the type genus Albanerpeton, making it the ge...
Article
Albanerpeton inexpectatumEstes and Hoffstetter, 1976, the type species of Albanerpeton and the geologically youngest albanerpetontid, is rediagnosed and redescribed based on a large collection of jaws and frontals from Miocene fissure fills near La Grive-Saint-Alban, southeastern France. Intraspecific variation is documented in these elements, and...
Article
albanerpetontid Gardner, J.D. 2000. Revised taxonomy of albanerpetontid amphibians. -Acta palaeon-tologica Polonica 45, 1,55--70. Characters of thejaws and frontals are often used to differentiate albanerpetontid genera and species, yet the reliability ofthese characters has rarely been examined. Frontals are diagnostic for the genefaAlbanerpeton a...

Citations

... Furthermore, paleoenvironmental reconstructions of the Guimarota beds suggest a mangrove-like environment (Gloy 2000;Martin 2000), whereas the Lourinhã Fm. has been interpreted as a fluvial environment with marked seasonality (Martinius and Gowland 2011;Taylor et al. 2014;Gowland et al. 2017;Mateus et al. 2017). Thus, the presence of two different species, either successive species of a single lineage, or two contemporary species but niche-segregated, needs to be considered; especially when different but coeval species of albanerpetontids have been collected in different ages from the same localities (Gardner 2000b) or, in contrast, a single species occurred through a long period of time (Gardner et al. 2021). Being a priori diagnostic and one of the most abundant identifiable cranial elements found in Lourinhã and Guimarota collections, fused frontal bones are the potentially optimal specimens to test for the presence or absence of multiple taxa. ...
... 298 al., 2013;Otero et al., 2014;Nicoli, 2017;Pérez-Ben et al., 2019;Carlini et al., 2021;Lemierre et al., 2021), it is sparse during the Mesozoic. Only a few species are recorded from the Early and Late Cretaceous: Arariphrynus placidoi (Leal et al., 2007;Báez et al., 2009), Eurycephalella alcinae , Cratia gracilis , Primaevorana cratensis (Moura et al., 2021), Kururubatrachus gondwanicus (Agnolin et al., 2020), Baurubatrachus pricei (Báez & Perí, 1989;Báez & Gómez, 2018) and Uberabatrachus carvalhoi (Báez et al., 2012) from Brazil; Hungarobatrachus szukacsi from Hungary (Szentesi & Venczel, 2010;Venczel et al., 2021); Indobatrachus pusillus from India (Noble, 1930;Špinar & Hodrová, 1985); and Beelzebufo ampinga from Madagascar (Evans et al., 2008). Additional Cretaceous neobatrachian records come from Chile and Argentina (calyptocephalellid neobatrachians, Báez, 1987;Martinelli & Forasiepi, 2004;Agnolin, 2012;Novas et al., 2019;Sterli et al., 2021;Moyano-Paz et al., 2022;Suazo-Lara & Gómez, 2022), from Sudan (neobatrachian indet., Báez & Werner, 1996) and Niger (neobatrachian indet., de Broin et al., 1974). ...
... As the taxonomic identification of fossil remains is, in the first instance, guided by our knowledge of diagnostic characters and variation among extant species, it is likely influenced by how extensively the different regions of skeletons of extant species have been studied. To detect possible publication biases concerning the osteology of extant species, we evaluated the information on the different skeletal regions of extant urodele species present in the literature (following the approach of [15]), comparing these data with the skeletal regions described from fossil localities. See electronic supplementary material, appendix S1 for details about taxa and localities. ...
... His unexpected death leaves a great void in the French palaeontological community and in the World palaeoherpetological community, of which he was an esteemed and prominent member. Jean-Claude's life and work have been the topic of recent papers (Roček et al., 2018;Steyer and Buffetaut, 2012) so that only a brief summary will be given here. During his distinguished career in palaeontology, at the "Centre national de la recherche scientifique" (CNRS), which he joined in 1968, Jean-Claude published several hundred papers, mainly in the field of palaeoherpetology, a topic on which he was an internationally recognized expert. ...
... Frogs (Anura) are nowadays common and abundant constituents of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems near globally (Wells, 2007) and their fossil record documents that they were important in tetrapod assemblages already in the Early Cretaceous (B aez et al., 2009;Dong et al., 2013;B aez and G omez, 2019;G omez and Lires, 2019). Their Upper Cretaceous record also depicts frogs as a typical element of continental tetrapod faunas near worldwide, but besides some outstanding exceptions (B aez et al., 2012a;B aez and G omez, 2018;Xing et al., 2018), it largely consists of isolated, fragmentary bones, usually found through screen-washing of sediments at microvertebrate localities (Estes and Sanchíz, 1982;Prasad and Rage, 2004;Ro cek et al., 2010;Company and Szentesi, 2012;Gardner and DeMar, 2013;Gardner et al., 2016;Rage et al., 2020). The known CampanianeMaastrichtian anuran fossils from Patagonia, the southernmost region of South America, also conform to this general pattern (B aez, 1987;Martinelli and Forasiepi, 2004;Agnolin, 2012;G omez, 2016;Novas et al., 2019;Suazo Lara, 2019) and their incomplete nature has often challenged their interpretation and identification. ...
... Itaboraí Basin, Aiuruoca Basin, Taubaté Basin; Souza et al. 2019Souza et al. , 2021. Another important factor for explaining species richness in South America is the glaciations events, which were unequally distributed across the continent, and created climatic refugees that Lynch (1971) Anura North, Central and South America No Spinar (1972) Anura Central Europe Yes (Paleogene) Estes & Reig (1973) Anura Worldwide No Báez & Gasparini (1977) Anura South America Yes (Cenozoic) Báez & Gasparini (1979) Anura South America No Estes (1981) Caudata and Gymnophiona Worldwide No Báez (1986) Anura Argentina Yes (Tertiary) Roček (1994) Urodela Europe No Van Dijk (1995) Lissamphibia Africa No Báez & Basso (1996) Anura South America Yes (Jurassic) Sanchiz (1998) Salientia Worldwide No Báez (2000) Anura South America Yes (Tertiary) Milner 2000 Caudata and Albanerpetontidae Worldwide Yes (Mesozoic and Tertiary) Roček (2000) Anura Worldwide Yes (Mesozoic) Roček & Rage (2000) Anura Worldwide, except South America Yes (Tertiary) Holman (2003) Anura North America No Holman (2006) Urodela North America No Cione & Báez (2007) Anura South America Yes (Cenozoic) Gardner & Böhme (2008) Albanerpetontidae Worldwide No Dong et al. (2013) Anura China Early Cretaceous Skutschas (2013) Caudata and Albanerpetontidae Middle Asia, Kazakhstan, and Siberia Mesozoic Roček (2013) Anura Laurasia Yes (Mesozoic and Tertiary) Gao et al. (2013) Urodela China Yes (Jurassic to Cretaceous) Gardner & DeMar (2013) Lissamphibia North America Mesozoic and Paleocene Schoch (2014) Lissamphibia Worldwide No Gardner (2016) Anura (only tadpoles) Worldwide No Gardner & Rage (2016) Lissamphibia Africa, Madagascar, and Arabia No Moreira (2016) Anura Worldwide Mesozoic Rage et al. (2020) Lissamphibia India Yes (Upper Cretaceous) Fig. 2 Map of South America showing localities (numbered according to our locality/taxonomic accounts section) that have yielded lissamphibian fossils were somewhat stable in certain regions (Carnaval and Moritz 2008;Carnaval et al. 2009;Lomolino et al. 2017). ...
... Fossils of caudates are rare on the African continent and they remain mostly undescribed. Reported occurrences from the Triassic-Jurassic interval are limited to the Middle Jurassic of Morocco and Madagascar, but their fragmentary nature means that it is uncertain whether they are even attributable to Caudata [35,36]. ...
... The upper Maastrichtian assemblages of amphibians in the Ibero-Armorican island (upper part of chron C30n) consist of albanerpetontids, discoglossid anurans, palaeobatrachids, and probably salamandrids ( Figure 10). In Haţeg island, the assemblages are dominated by albanerpetontids and alytid anurans [32,215], the latter represented by two taxa (Paralatonia transylvanica and cf. Eodiscoglossus). ...
... Two edentulous, non-pipoid fossil frogs have been described from the Mesozoic of the Northern Hemisphere: Theatonius from the late Cretaceous of Wyoming (Fox, 1976) and Tyrrellbatrachus from the late Cretaceous of Alberta (Gardner, 2015). These two crown-group anurans have an uncertain placement in the frog tree of life but are likely distantly related to one another. ...
... E. browni tooth from the DC Bonebed. Eodelphis browni proper has previously been documented in the Oldman and Dinosaur Park formations (Fox and Naylor, 2006;Scott and Fox, 2015;Brannick and Wilson, 2020), but not in the HC Formation. Two mammal teeth, representing a multituberculate and a pediomyid marsupial, were reported from Kleskun Hill (Fanti and Miyashita, 2009;Fox and Scott, 2010), but these are less useful in establishing faunal correlations. ...