James C. Mouton's research while affiliated with University of Montana and other places

Publications (12)

Article
Maternal hormones can shape offspring development and increase survival when predation risk is elevated. In songbirds, yolk androgens influence offspring growth and begging behaviors which can help mitigate offspring predation risk in the nest. Other steroids may also be important for responding to nest predation risk, but non-androgen steroids hav...
Article
Flight is one of the most effective yet energetically demanding means of movement. Its energy costs are normally associated with interspecific variation in efficiency, size of organs, and physiological systems that reflect different flight capacities. Adaptive morphological variation may be constrained by physical demands that vary with body size,...
Article
In a wide range of taxa, there is evidence that mothers adaptively shape the development of offspring behaviour by exposing them to steroids. These maternal effects have major implications for fitness because, by shaping early development, they can permanently alter how offspring interact with their environment. However, theory on parent–offspring...
Article
Full-text available
Parents faced with a predator must choose between their own safety versus taking care of their offspring. Each choice can have fitness costs. Life-history theory predicts that longer-lived species should be less willing than shorter-lived species to return to care for their offspring after a predator disturbance because they have more opportunities...
Article
Full-text available
Droughts are expected to increase in frequency and severity with climate change. Population impacts of such harsh environmental events are theorized to vary with life history strategies among species. However, existing demographic models generally do not consider behavioural plasticity that may modify the impact of harsh events. Here we show that t...
Article
Developmental responses can help young animals reduce predation risk but can also yield costs to performance and survival in subsequent life stages with major implications for lifetime fitness. Compensatory mechanisms may evolve to offset such costs, but evidence from natural systems is largely lacking. In songbirds, increased nest predation risk s...
Article
Full-text available
Survival rates vary dramatically among species and predictably across latitudes, but causes of this variation are unclear. The rate-of-living hypothesis posits that physiological damage from metabolism causes species with faster metabolic rates to exhibit lower survival rates. However, whether increased survival commonly observed in tropical and so...
Preprint
Full-text available
Survival rates vary dramatically among species and predictably across latitudes, but causes of this variation are unclear. The rate of living hypothesis posits that physiological damage from metabolism causes species with faster metabolic rates to exhibit lower survival rates. However, whether increased survival commonly observed in tropical and so...
Article
1.Offspring mortality varies dramatically among species with critical demographic and evolutionary ramifications, yet the causes of this variation remain unclear. Nests are widely used for breeding across taxa and thought to influence offspring mortality risk. Traditionally, more complex, enclosed nest structures are thought to reduce offspring pre...
Article
Interspecific aggregations of prey may provide benefits by mitigating predation risk, but they can also create costs if they increase competition for resources or are more easily detectable by predators. Variation in predation risk and resource availability may influence the occurrence and fitness effects of aggregating in nature. Yet tests of such...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Adult survival is central to theories explaining latitudinal gradients in life history strategies. Life history theory predicts higher adult survival in tropical than north temperate regions given lower fecundity and parental effort. Early studies were consistent with this prediction, but standard‐effort netting studies in recent decades sugges...

Citations

... In essence, the embryo may be switching off hormonal triggers provided by the mother. This metabolism of maternal steroids by embryos is an active process, because it only occurs in eggs with live embryos (Mouton & Duckworth, 2021), and the embryo may differentially metabolize maternal hormones from egg components based on ecologically relevant cues such as food availability, parasite abundance, or position in the laying sequence . For example, rock pigeon (Columba livia) embryos in the second-laid egg with relatively high testosterone Biological Reviews (2022) 000-000 © 2022 Cambridge Philosophical Society. ...
... On the other hand, both lethal and nonlethal effects of predation may still impact individuals beyond their reproductive output. Parents may reduce the time and energy allocated to care for their offspring, or they may be killed or injured while defending a nest, which may compromise current and future breeding attempts (Creel & Christianson, 2008;Cresswell, 2008;Oteyza et al., 2021). Even if not providing clear reproductive advantages in terms of the number of chicks produced, the protection provided by lesser kestrels in mixed colonies against predators may still result in an adaptive breeding strategy for rollers. ...
... Changes in annual rainfall and El Niño-Southern Oscillation have been implicated as important drivers of population demography among Neotropical birds. Both excessive rainfall in La Niña years (25,39,40) and too little rainfall in El Niño years (38,(41)(42)(43) can have negative demographic consequences on tropical bird populations, including reduced survival (41,42), population growth rates (38), and recruitment (38,43). For example, nearly onethird of 20 common bird species captured at our study site exhibited reduced annual population growth rates in response to longer dry seasons (38). ...
... Variation in the extent of daily movement of young is also important to understand because it may affect both predation risk and parental food delivery rates. Remaining in a single, safe patch may reduce predation risk (Mouton et al. 2020) but yield food depletion that increases feeding effort by parents and causes lower food delivery rates (Bonal & Aparicio 2008). Movement of young to new patches may be beneficial for food delivery but can expose them to predation risk (Martel & Dill 1995), depending on their locomotor ability to avoid predators. ...
... High MR across 46 species was associated with lower survival. (8) Many researchers discuss that overweight may accelerate the rate of aging and shortening lifespan and health span. (9) Overweight associated with excess mortality and greatly increase in coronary artery disease incidence. ...
... For instance, it is possible that costs associated with nest building could have led to the loss of domed nests. While we lack information on whether building domed nests represents a higher energetic cost over building open nests, nest building is considered a costly activity and domed nests are heavier relative to the size of the builder when compared to open nests (Hansell, 2000;Mouton & Martin, 2019). The type of nest a species builds could also be tightly linked with its ability to live across different habitats or environments. ...
... In birds, predation influences nest types and concealment, mating behaviors, and reproductive behavior and physiology (e.g., Ricklefs 1969Ricklefs , 1977Slagsvold 1982;Lima 1987Lima , 2009Martin 1988Martin , 1993Martin , 1995Martin and Briskie 2009). Further, risk varies relative to open-cup, primary cavity, and secondary cavity nesters (Nice 1957;Nilsson 1984;Martin 1993Martin , 1995 as cavity-nesting species generally experience less nest predation (Nice 1957, Martin 1993, Fontaine et al. 2007; see also Mouton and Martin 2018). ...
... Daily nest predation was modelled using the logistic exposure method (Shaffer, 2004). We obtained adult mortality estimates for the same South Africa and Arizona species from Martin, Oteyza, Boyce, et al. (2015), and the same Malaysian species from Martin et al. (2017). Adult mortality was estimated using a modified mark-recapture technique that included re-sighting field methodology, a technique where nest-searching crews record colour-banded birds when observed, increasing detection probability. ...
... This implies that the low temperature in the morning might threaten egg viability. Our results did not find temperature effects on hatching success, but whether temperature influences nestling development, physiological condition or survival remains unmeasured (DuRant et al., 2013;Gullett et al., 2015;Martin et al., 2017). Future studies should measure these comprehensive effects of temperature on eggs. ...